Aleenaa
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Hey guys. I really need some help. I have researched a lot into this myself but I am so confused. So I have recently finished my GCSE's, however I KNOW that I did very poorly. This is because my father passed away right before my exams and this has messed me up in all kinda mental and emotional ways. I am really annoyed because I put a hell of lot of work into my coursework. I am someone who is predicted A*/A/ & B's and I know there's no way in hell that I have got anywhere near that.

My original plan was to do my A Levels, which I chose as : Chemistry, Biology, RS and Psychology and apply for medicine. However, knowing that I did my GCSE's poorly, what can I do? Should I do my GCSE's again? I am pretty see my school 6th form will accept me to do my a levels no matter what grades I got, and I don't really wanna be a year behind. Also, if I do my GCSE's again, there's been a change in courses and I don't want to learn a new syllabus. .. And whenever I research for medicine it says the entry requirements are 3 A's at A levels. This has been on my mind a lot and it is really stressing me out so I would appreciate any help!

Sorry if this didn't make any sense // x
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perflous
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Wait until Results Day, they might not be as bad as you think they're going to be. If they are quite poor, a family tragedy like the one you have experienced will count as extenuating circumstances on your uni application - basically, they'll cut you some slack and be slightly more understanding as to why you performed badly. Obviously, you'll have to get excellent grades at AS/A-Level to make up for your poor GCSEs.

Really sorry for your loss.
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Paralove
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Don't worry yet until you get your results. But if you do really well in A-Levels and in other tests like the UKCAT/BMAT needed at some unis, you may well still be in with a chance. Some unis do want certain GCSE grades, but you may be given a little leniency if, when applying, the school mentions the circumstances under which your GCSE grades were achieved, in the reference they give you.

Relax at the moment. Until you get your grades, there isn't anything you can do yet. But unless you don't get C grades in English and maths, it is not worth retaking your GCSEs.
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Aleenaa
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Thank you guys so much! I've already got A* in core science and a B in English language, so I guess it's just maths. /:
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Aleenaa
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Sorry guys, it is really competitive to get into medicine and I've also read when applying for medicine you may be turned down even if you've got good results.. So this is putting me off? :'( I'm so confused and scared because seriously there is nothing else I want to to. Another thing is, even though I don't know how A Level will be like but I think that I will get a B in RS a level because it is not really my strongest point at GCSE.. I definitely like history better.. The only reason why I had applied for RS was because of how beneficial the knowledge will be and easy it is. But now knowing that I have to get A A A A for my a level, is it worth me changing that subject?
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Lincoln_R
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You could always do what I'm planning to do as a back up and apply for medicine after completing a different but related course. Preferably not too long as you probably want out of uni and into a job as soon as possible.
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Paralove
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(Original post by Aleenaa)
Sorry guys, it is really competitive to get into medicine and I've also read when applying for medicine you may be turned down even if you've got poor results.. So this is putting me off? :'( I'm so confused and scared because seriously there is nothing else I want to to. Another thing is, even though I don't know how A Level will be like but I think that I will get a B in RS a level because it is not really my strongest point at GCSE.. I definitely like history better.. The only reason why I had applied for RS was because of how knowledgeable and easy it is. But now knowing that I have to get A A A A for my a level, is it worth me changing that subject?
Honestly, you don't need to worry yet. If you work hard you can get straight A's. Besides, they won't be too concerned if it's a B but you drop it after AS, and it isn't relevant to medicine.

Like Lincoln said, you can always do a degree first and then try to get in for graduate medicine instead, or see if there are any foundation years available (not entirely sure if there are, but have a look!) - though honestly, this is nothing to concern yourself with until after you get your AS exam results next year. You'll be fine.
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username1155480
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(Original post by Lincoln_R)
You could always do what I'm planning to do as a back up and apply for medicine after completing a different but related course. Preferably not too long as you probably want out of uni and into a job as soon as possible.
Don't aim for graduate entry as it is much more competitive and once the grad funding schemes go, paying for another 5 years will be hell.
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Lincoln_R
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(Original post by Jaska)
Don't aim for graduate entry as it is much more competitive and once the grad funding schemes go, paying for another 5 years will be hell.
Of course, but it would be just in case option
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Aleenaa
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(Original post by Lincoln_R)
You could always do what I'm planning to do as a back up and apply for medicine after completing a different but related course. Preferably not too long as you probably want out of uni and into a job as soon as possible.
Hey Lincoln! Sorry guys please forgive me for my ignorance but I'm a lil confused - I've always said Pharmacy will be my backup plan but I really want to become a doctor so I'm not even thinking about that right now - so if I understand correctly you're saying to do that and then apply to do medicine?
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Aleenaa
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(Original post by Lincoln_R)
Of course, but it would be just in case option
What do you mean don't apply for graduate entry? How else do you get into medicine then? Once again please forgive me for my ignorance :|
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BlindingLight
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If your GCSE's aren't up to scratch, you can apply to Universities which are UKCAT heavy/pay more emphasis to A level grades or the BMAT.
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Aleenaa
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(Original post by Blackshadow)
If your GCSE's aren't up to scratch, you can apply to Universities which are UKCAT heavy/pay more emphasis to A level grades or the BMAT.
So I've just researched what this is and it's making me soo much more nervous! Especially because you can't even revise for it /:
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Aleenaa
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(Original post by Paralove)
Honestly, you don't need to worry yet. If you work hard you can get straight A's. Besides, they won't be too concerned if it's a B but you drop it after AS, and it isn't relevant to medicine.

Like Lincoln said, you can always do a degree first and then try to get in for graduate medicine instead, or see if there are any foundation years available (not entirely sure if there are, but have a look!) - though honestly, this is nothing to concern yourself with until after you get your AS exam results next year. You'll be fine.
This whole university degree talk is confusing the hell outta me lol! But thank you for reassuring me, I really do appreciate it ☺️☺️
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BlindingLight
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(Original post by Aleenaa)
So I've just researched what this is and it's making me soo much more nervous! Especially because you can't even revise for it /:
Firstly, relax. You can prepare for the UKCAT and BMAT, you even have past papers available for them. Wait till you get your GCSE results first, then you can worry about it.

If it makes you feel any better, I didn't think seriously about medicine before I finished my AS levels. There's really no point in stressing out this early.
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Paralove
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(Original post by Aleenaa)
This whole university degree talk is confusing the hell outta me lol! But thank you for reassuring me, I really do appreciate it ☺️☺️
Well incase you don't quite know, graduate entry means you do a degree first, and then apply for medicine that is for graduates (aka people with a degree) only. The course is usually 4 years for grad entry, not 5 like if you did undergraduate medicine.

If you do a foundation year, this is usually for those who don't get the grades/meet all the requirements e.g. Not having relevant subjects to go straight into the degree. It is an extra year on the degree but you still graduate with the same degree as those who didn't do the foundation year
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Aleenaa
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(Original post by Blackshadow)
Firstly, relax. You can prepare for the UKCAT and BMAT, you even have past papers available for them. Wait till you get your GCSE results first, then you can worry about it.

If it makes you feel any better, I didn't think seriously about medicine before I finished my AS levels. There's really no point in stressing out this early.
Thank you very much. The only reason why I am stressing so much is because I thought GCSE's are essential in getting into medicine and just thinking about the consequences is scary
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Aleenaa
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(Original post by Paralove)
Well incase you don't quite know, graduate entry means you do a degree first, and then apply for medicine that is for graduates (aka people with a degree) only. The course is usually 4 years for grad entry, not 5 like if you did undergraduate medicine.

If you do a foundation year, this is usually for those who don't get the grades/meet all the requirements e.g. Not having relevant subjects to go straight into the degree. It is an extra year on the degree but you still graduate with the same degree as those who didn't do the foundation year
Ooo right thank you. So when you do the 'degree' first as you said - what degree is it and what is it based on?

And for what you said about the foundation level - just to confirm - you would do that, then the 'degree' & then the medicine qualification degree?

Sorry if you don't understand, I'm just tryna get my head around it x
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Paralove
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(Original post by Aleenaa)
Ooo right thank you. So when you do the 'degree' first as you said - what degree is it and what is it based on?

And for what you said about the foundation level - just to confirm - you would do that, then the 'degree' & then the medicine qualification degree?

Sorry if you don't understand, I'm just tryna get my head around it x
In general terms, a degree is anything you study at uni that leads to a BSc or BA, and is 3-4 years long (bar med/vet med which is longer).

The first degree could be anything. Biology, biomedicine, chemistry, French... Anything at all.

No, the foundation year you would do straight after A-Level. Then, you go on to get your degree - the foundation year leads onto that degree. So you could do a foundation year in pharmacy for example, then after you can continue and do the 'proper' degree. Or do a foundation year for med, then continue onto the normal 5-yr programme to get your degree in medicine.

Graduate entry is where you do a degree first e.g. Biology, then after you apply to study medicine as a graduate (aka you have a degree - an undergraduate is someone studying for their first degree, and an undergrad degree is one where you get a BA or BSc, usually, and can get straight onto it after doing A-Levels or equivalent). The only thing with graduate entry is that after you get your first degree, you have to pay for the tuition fees (and I think living costs) yourself, unless you can get funding from schemes. So you would have to pay £9k/yr on your own without getting funding, and because there are less places available for graduate medicine, it is more competitive and you'd have to get a 2:1 if not a 1st in your first degree to stand a good chance.
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FergieD
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(Original post by Aleenaa)
Ooo right thank you. So when you do the 'degree' first as you said - what degree is it and what is it based on?

And for what you said about the foundation level - just to confirm - you would do that, then the 'degree' & then the medicine qualification degree?

Sorry if you don't understand, I'm just tryna get my head around it x
Don't stress about the GCSE's - I'm starting this september with 3 A's and one A*, got three offers - just focus on doing the best you can in all of your exams (As, A-level, GCSE, UKCAT and BMAT if you do it) When you have your scores (minus A-level) just apply strategically to med schools that value the areas you did particularly well in

- Don't start thinking about grad entry yet, its about ten times more competitive than A-level entry, not to mention extraordinarily expensive.
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