Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Hey guys,

    I'm holding an unconditional offer for Imperial's CS master program (the one for non-CS majors), but I'm a bit worried about the pace and general difficulty of the whole course as I'm relatively unexperienced in programming (just done some basic C++ s far).
    What were your experiences with the program, did you enjoy the course and was it quite doable? My background is business economics (so not very scientific). Really looking forward to hear back from you guys, thanks a lot!

    Best,
    Matthias
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Hi Mattias,

    I emailed the admissions tutors last year about the course (as I am thinking of applying for it) and they told me that I would find some elements easier as I have extensive programming knowledge. Of course, there will be other people who will be joining you with a lot of CS knowledge and experience, but it is not a prerequisite for the course and therefore will not be assumed; as long as you put the work in you shouldn't fall behind - it just might take you longer than someone else to pick up on things, and debug :P .
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MattRaupa)
    Hey guys,

    I'm holding an unconditional offer for Imperial's CS master program (the one for non-CS majors), but I'm a bit worried about the pace and general difficulty of the whole course as I'm relatively unexperienced in programming (just done some basic C++ s far).
    What were your experiences with the program, did you enjoy the course and was it quite doable? My background is business economics (so not very scientific). Really looking forward to hear back from you guys, thanks a lot!

    Best,
    Matthias
    Hey!

    I will be doing the one for CS majors (advanced computing), and my background is nothing to do with CS either, though I do have quite a bit of programming experience.

    Looking at the conversion course, it seems to be pretty standard 1st and 2nd year undergrad material, so you should be fine!

    (Original post by ViralRiver)
    Hi Mattias,

    I emailed the admissions tutors last year about the course (as I am thinking of applying for it) and they told me that I would find some elements easier as I have extensive programming knowledge. Of course, there will be other people who will be joining you with a lot of CS knowledge and experience, but it is not a prerequisite for the course and therefore will not be assumed; as long as you put the work in you shouldn't fall behind - it just might take you longer than someone else to pick up on things, and debug :P .
    If you have extensive programming knowledge already, why not do MSc Advanced Computing? It sounds a lot more varied and interesting. http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/computing/admissions/pg/mac

    You also get much more freedom in selecting modules (almost everything is elective).

    For the same price as the conversion course, too.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ihavemooedtoday)
    Hey!

    I will be doing the one for CS majors (advanced computing), and my background is nothing to do with CS either, though I do have quite a bit of programming experience.

    Looking at the conversion course, it seems to be pretty standard 1st and 2nd year undergrad material, so you should be fine!



    If you have extensive programming knowledge already, why not do MSc Advanced Computing? It sounds a lot more varied and interesting. http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/computing/admissions/pg/mac

    You also get much more freedom in selecting modules (almost everything is elective).

    For the same price as the conversion course, too.
    I was advised it was for CS majors only.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Isn't there anybody here that already absolved the aforementioned course? I'm also very interested about the exact length of the whole program, especially concerning the Individual Software Project at the end and whether it is necessary to stay in London during the project?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ViralRiver)
    I was advised it was for CS majors only.
    It's designed for CS majors, but they don't require a CS degree, as long as you can show that you have roughly equivalent level of knowledge and experience as CS majors. I applied and was admitted.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ihavemooedtoday)
    It's designed for CS majors, but they don't require a CS degree, as long as you can show that you have roughly equivalent level of knowledge and experience as CS majors. I applied and was admitted.
    Thanks for the reply; it will be something I consider if I can get the funding for the degree .
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Probably it's too late but I can give you feedback on the course... to make it short, it is probably the most intense, exhausting and difficult time in my life so far. You need to work 24/7 to get at least a pass, for people that have no math background...good luck!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Okay, so I recently survived the course and wanted to share my insights with you. The course is hard, really hard, they keep you working like insane and the grading is tough.
    Nevertheless, the master's degree is worth it. The learning curve is really steep since they maximized the content that can be put into a one-year program, basically you're learning 75% of the content covered in their undergraduate program + appropriate master electives. You will learn about C++, Java, Assembly Programming, Logic and AI Programming, Computer Architecture, Computer Systems, Logic Systems, Program Design, Algorithms etc. In the spring term you have to choose four electives that include interesting subjects like robotics, concurrent programming, networks, Artificial intelligence and much more.

    You have to submit weekly assignments, group projects or papers, literally you are working continuously from the first week in October until the end of September. Your final master's projects can be really scientific or applied, this is dependent on the projects you choose. The professors are good and approachable. The brand name Imperial College helps a lot and the placement is excellent, many alumni either found their own startups, move into consulting or bulge bracket investment banks or go to one of the big tech companies like Palantir, Amazon, Google etc. The people you are studying with come from top universities in Europe (most from Oxbridge etc.) or American universities (like Ivy, Johns Hopkins, Wellesley etc.) and are smart and hard-working. All in all, the program is tough but prepares you well for whatever career you choose afterwards and provides you with an awesome brand name and excellent education.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    do you need maths A-level for the course ?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I go to a top 10 uni and I study politics BA
    I will be taking A-level maths to help me during programming
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.