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    Just curious...
    Can a BSc Actuarial Science degree be classified as a "math degree"?


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    I would class it as a mathematical degree because of the high maths content... However, generally when you hear someone say they do a maths degree, it means just that, they do maths.

    What do you even mean by a maths degree? A numerate degree? Or something else?
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    In terms of what a straight maths degree is like, I'd say no it's not. The content, and style of it, is probably more similar to an economics degree - but I'm speculating here.
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    I would say it's a quantitative degree but not a maths degree.
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    (Original post by a5a09)
    I would say it's a quantitative degree but not a maths degree.
    Essentially, it's got only math! And math alone.


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    (Original post by Sidhant Shivram)
    Essentially, it's got only math! And math alone.


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    I believe that you will be disappointed if you want to do a maths degree but you got into an actuarial science one, they are 2 stories.

    I am not someone who is not really familiar to any maths degrees at all, but what I can tell you is that maths is not just sth with numbers, itself is a brunch of theories. Consider accounting is a subject with lots of involvement of numbers too, how can you call it as a maths degree?

    It's got only math is definitely wrong. Lets read the syl. of actuarial science at cass.

    Cass Actuarial Science Syl.

    In its final year of studies, the electives aren't maths at all. In addition, I am quite sure that its year 1 and year 2 aren't as mathy as a math degree. The mathematical depth of the degree is not as deep as you thought I guess.
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    (Original post by a5a09)
    I believe that you will be disappointed if you want to do a maths degree but you got into an actuarial science one, they are 2 stories.

    I am not someone who is not really familiar to any maths degrees at all, but what I can tell you is that maths is not just sth with numbers, itself is a brunch of theories. Consider accounting is a subject with lots of involvement of numbers too, how can you call it as a maths degree?

    It's got only math is definitely wrong. Lets read the syl. of actuarial science at cass.

    Cass Actuarial Science Syl.

    In its final year of studies, the electives aren't maths at all. In addition, I am quite sure that its year 1 and year 2 aren't as mathy as a math degree. The mathematical depth of the degree is not as deep as you thought I guess.
    I said that referring to actuarial science as a branch of applied mathematics (Actuarial Science is a branch of applied mathematics). Not the syllabus of an actuarial science degree as such. But what you've said about the mathematical theories may be what makes an AS degree different from a math degree.


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    If you break down the different types of Maths then you'll find that AS focuses a lot on Stats as that is the job of an actuary. Not sure how much Mechanics or Pure Maths you'd be doing to any high level, or to the same level as someone doing a Maths Degree.

    You could argue that a Physics degree is an applied maths degree...

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    (Original post by Schleigg)
    If you break down the different types of Maths then you'll find that AS focuses a lot on Stats as that is the job of an actuary. Not sure how much Mechanics or Pure Maths you'd be doing to any high level, or to the same level as someone doing a Maths Degree.

    You could argue that a Physics degree is an applied maths degree...

    Hardly any mechanics & pure math, I believe.


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    Wouldn't actuarial science be under the "Mathematics, Statistics and Operational Research" in the QAA framework thingy?

    http://www.qaa.ac.uk/en/Publications...l-research.pdf
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    (Original post by Sidhant Shivram)
    Just curious...
    Can a BSc Actuarial Science degree be classified as a "math degree"?


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    No.
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    As someone studying a straight maths degree, with 1 actuarial exemption from 1 module and currently on an actuarial internship. I would not say an actuarial science degree is a "maths degree". It would contain a high level of numerical content but in no way represents a maths degree. I haven't seen number in my degree in years whereas actuarial science would deal with a lot of stats (my one exemption is CT3, the probability one) and a lot of financial maths and econ whereas my degree - bar my optional module - is a lot of algebra and analysis which you would not see in an AS degree at all...
 
 
 
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