Need opinions on mental health problems for my project :) Watch

madisonyoung
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I'm doing a project (it counts for GCSE) and I'm doing it on the need for education about mental disorders. I'm going to be covering things such as stereotypes and discrimination, labels (for example when people say 'yeah im so OCD' or 'that makes me feel so depressed') and education/legislation about this. I'm wondering if any of you have any views on this, the internet is useful but it doesn't contain such personal opinions as I could find here.
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DannyYYYY
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Do you have a specific question I could answer? I just find it a lot easier giving my opinion from a direct answer.
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The_Lonely_Goatherd
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:ditto:

Time to Change are currently doing a survey of attitudes within education to the mentally ill. Maybe you should have a look at it?
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Anonymous #1
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people don't understand what they haven't personally experienced, and with mental conditions its no different. in my case i was and still am highly embarrassed about my personal phobia that i went 4 years without even acknowledging the problem i had myself.

personally i went from a confident, outgoing person to a recluse who refused to do anything which involved speaking in front of more than 2 people, so naturally i had to quit university (twice). the problem i had at the time was how to cover up the underlying reason behind it, so i had to say things like 'it was boring' 'i can't be bothered with education'.

the way i view mental conditions is that we are each hard wired to react to different situations in different ways. in my case i refuse to talk about it even to family, and only then to medical professionals because of medical confidentiality, other people would acknowledge a problem and seek help.

another issue people suffer is that admitting to having a mental condition is not always the first step to 'getting better'. were it not for my parents willing to spend many thousands on therapy to give me access to psychological help, i would probably still be waiting to be assessed (21 months on). at least my GP who i have known for many years, was honest with me - one of his first questions after i told him what my condition entailed was 'do you have some money?' . thats another problem, the NHS does not cater for these conditions.

after i leave university i will of course be applying for jobs. if i list my conditions on applications then i won't get the job, as its such a competitive market out there. there is legislation but you can't prove they have rejected you for mental health reasons!
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DCFCfan4eva
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(Original post by madisonyoung)
I'm doing a project (it counts for GCSE) and I'm doing it on the need for education about mental disorders. I'm going to be covering things such as stereotypes and discrimination, labels (for example when people say 'yeah im so OCD' or 'that makes me feel so depressed') and education/legislation about this. I'm wondering if any of you have any views on this, the internet is useful but it doesn't contain such personal opinions as I could find here.

more than happy to help but as been said above, it would be easier if you had a specifc quiestion(s) we could answer or a survey or something
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madisonyoung
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(Original post by DannyYYYY)
Do you have a specific question I could answer? I just find it a lot easier giving my opinion from a direct answer.
Questions such as 'do you feel that mentally ill people are treated differently in society than others' and things like that are what im looking for sorry
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madisonyoung
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(Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
:ditto:

Time to Change are currently doing a survey of attitudes within education to the mentally ill. Maybe you should have a look at it?

thank you very much, i will definitely have a look!!
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madisonyoung
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(Original post by Anonymous)
people don't understand what they haven't personally experienced, and with mental conditions its no different. in my case i was and still am highly embarrassed about my personal phobia that i went 4 years without even acknowledging the problem i had myself.

personally i went from a confident, outgoing person to a recluse who refused to do anything which involved speaking in front of more than 2 people, so naturally i had to quit university (twice). the problem i had at the time was how to cover up the underlying reason behind it, so i had to say things like 'it was boring' 'i can't be bothered with education'.

the way i view mental conditions is that we are each hard wired to react to different situations in different ways. in my case i refuse to talk about it even to family, and only then to medical professionals because of medical confidentiality, other people would acknowledge a problem and seek help.

another issue people suffer is that admitting to having a mental condition is not always the first step to 'getting better'. were it not for my parents willing to spend many thousands on therapy to give me access to psychological help, i would probably still be waiting to be assessed (21 months on). at least my GP who i have known for many years, was honest with me - one of his first questions after i told him what my condition entailed was 'do you have some money?' . thats another problem, the NHS does not cater for these conditions.

after i leave university i will of course be applying for jobs. if i list my conditions on applications then i won't get the job, as its such a competitive market out there. there is legislation but you can't prove they have rejected you for mental health reasons!
thank you so much for sharing your personal experience! i think that one of the reasons i chose this topic is because im shocked that people with mental illnesses feel that they need to cover it up and pretend that everything is ok. it shouldnt be something that people are ashamed of, and the fact that some people are scared to share their problems, perhaps because they are afraid of what people will think, is wrong.

i also wish that people could see through conditions such as phobias and many other mental illnesses, and treat the people suffering from them just the same. the NHS should be trying their best to combat the growing problems of mental illness. putting your phobia on a job application should not put off an employer, you might turn out to be brilliant at the job, and they would never know. i think that people should know what different mental illnesses mean, at least more than they do now, and if someone with a mental illness applies for a job, then companies should be aware of how they can work with them, so that we can stop mental illness being such a taboo subject.
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Lizzie0202
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In my experience, you're better being physically unwell than mentally unwell. I have one of the most hated mental illnesses (bpd) particularly by professionals (which doesn't help) and although i know my illness is what makes me who i am and i cant change other people just see it as being "emotional".

Being in school with mental health problems is horrendous! People would say like whats wrong with her when i used to start shaking or if i had to leave the classroom they would i was "pathetic". In the end i got bullied badly people would pull up my sleeves in the corridor, they would call me an emo and would tell me to go kill myself already. It didn't help that teachers didn't know how to handle me when i was manic, depressed or dissociating. They would allow me to leave classes and go and sit in my head of years office but they didn't know how to talk to me when i was in that state.

I think everyone should be educated to some extent about mental health as there is a massive stigma! When people have knowledge about things the fear goes away!

If you have any questions let me know
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Anonymous #2
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I have two phobias and one I've managed to get help for so I'm just anxious about it now rather than phobic, but I wouldn't admit to two of them since they don't feel like socially acceptable phobias, unlike phobias of heights, flying etc that seem more acceptable. Plus I don't like sharing this sort of thing anyway
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Tiger Rag
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I can't do links on my iPad, but can I suggest you look through a thread in this section - what are your opinions on depression? I think that's the title.

In general, I've found that people are more sympathic with physical health issues than mental health ones.
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shawn_o1
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To some people, mental health is an excuse to not do certain things that every other able-bodied person can do. So I don't think education will solve the problem, it'll only reinforce that belief and the stigma surrounding mental health.
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madisonyoung
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(Original post by Lizzie0202)
In my experience, you're better being physically unwell than mentally unwell. I have one of the most hated mental illnesses (bpd) particularly by professionals (which doesn't help) and although i know my illness is what makes me who i am and i cant change other people just see it as being "emotional".

Being in school with mental health problems is horrendous! People would say like whats wrong with her when i used to start shaking or if i had to leave the classroom they would i was "pathetic". In the end i got bullied badly people would pull up my sleeves in the corridor, they would call me an emo and would tell me to go kill myself already. It didn't help that teachers didn't know how to handle me when i was manic, depressed or dissociating. They would allow me to leave classes and go and sit in my head of years office but they didn't know how to talk to me when i was in that state.

I think everyone should be educated to some extent about mental health as there is a massive stigma! When people have knowledge about things the fear goes away!

If you have any questions let me know
thank you so much for sharing this! i think it's truly awful when people write off mental illnesses as 'just emotional' or 'hormonal'. i have a friend who called bipolar disorder 'mood swings and a s*** attitude'.

i think its awful that you had to go through all this at school, you didnt need to deal with emotional pressure and bullying on top of what you were already feeling. i dont think that people understand how damaging words can be, especially to someone who already thinks so badly of themselves. people i know seem to think that mental illness is attention seeking which is awful and in most cases very far from the truth. i totally agree, if people were educated, even if only a little bit, they would understand and be able to deal with it more easily. teachers should know how to deal with things like mental illness to a point, they are working with such a wide variety of people that they are bound to come across something like this at some point of their career.
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madisonyoung
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I have two phobias and one I've managed to get help for so I'm just anxious about it now rather than phobic, but I wouldn't admit to two of them since they don't feel like socially acceptable phobias, unlike phobias of heights, flying etc that seem more acceptable. Plus I don't like sharing this sort of thing anyway
the fact that you feel that you cant share two of your phobias because you dont feel like they are 'socially acceptable' is exactly the sort of reason why i chose this topic for my project. you cant help what you have a phobia of, you need support and you cant get that if people will judge you because of it. people need to learn that mental illness is a lot more common than they might think, and that dealing with mental illness is something they will probably have to do. thank you for sharing this
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madisonyoung
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(Original post by OU Student)
I can't do links on my iPad, but can I suggest you look through a thread in this section - what are your opinions on depression? I think that's the title.

In general, I've found that people are more sympathic with physical health issues than mental health ones.
thank you, i will definitely have a look.
and yes, i agree with that. i guess its the attention seeking thing, if people can see a physical symptom they can tell its a real illness, but if its all in your head, others might think youre making it up for attention. which is an awful stereotype:mad:
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madisonyoung
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(Original post by shawn_o1)
To some people, mental health is an excuse to not do certain things that every other able-bodied person can do. So I don't think education will solve the problem, it'll only reinforce that belief and the stigma surrounding mental health.
this is a really interesting view, and i agree that for some people, making out that they are mentally ill is a way of temporarily solving some problems. but for the people who are actually mentally ill, something still needs to be done and perhaps not by education but by raising awareness for the symptoms and means of treatment, then at least people can understand it better. i will defintiely discuss what youve shared in my project because it shows a view completely different to my own which is really helpful
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bluebeetle
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(Original post by madisonyoung)
I'm doing a project (it counts for GCSE) and I'm doing it on the need for education about mental disorders. I'm going to be covering things such as stereotypes and discrimination, labels (for example when people say 'yeah im so OCD' or 'that makes me feel so depressed') and education/legislation about this. I'm wondering if any of you have any views on this, the internet is useful but it doesn't contain such personal opinions as I could find here.
I've got asperger's, and I generally think that people have become much more educated on it in the past five years or so, nowadays when people find out they almost always know what it is and that it's something to do with being socially awkward.
In terms of labels, I don't actually mind. I think people understand that mental disorders are serious but can still joke about them ("stop being so autistic" is one that's used a fair bit among my friends, not just aimed at me). I think policing those words is too PC, saying that you can't use the word autism outside of the most serious settings makes it seem more serious than it needs to be a lot of the time and makes people scared to ask me questions about it. On the other hand, people who actually self-diagnose mental conditions annoy me.
This is specific to autism spectrum disorders, but I think people need to be more educated on what it can involve. Autism has a massive range of symptoms, and it is possible to come across an autistic person who doesn't seem socially awkward at first.
Overall, though, I think people are pretty understanding. I've not come across much discrimination, most people in my year group at school knew about my diagnosis and nobody was ever mean to me about it. New people I meet actually go out of their way not to be mean about it, which can be funny.

(On a side note, "that makes me feel depressed" isn't offensive since depression is both an mental condition and an emotion that anybody can experience. The condition is named after the emotion.)



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madisonyoung
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(Original post by bluebeetle)
I've got asperger's, and I generally think that people have become much more educated on it in the past five years or so, nowadays when people find out they almost always know what it is and that it's something to do with being socially awkward.
In terms of labels, I don't actually mind. I think people understand that mental disorders are serious but can still joke about them ("stop being so autistic" is one that's used a fair bit among my friends, not just aimed at me). I think policing those words is too PC, saying that you can't use the word autism outside of the most serious settings makes it seem more serious than it needs to be a lot of the time and makes people scared to ask me questions about it. On the other hand, people who actually self-diagnose mental conditions annoy me.
This is specific to autism spectrum disorders, but I think people need to be more educated on what it can involve. Autism has a massive range of symptoms, and it is possible to come across an autistic person who doesn't seem socially awkward at first.
Overall, though, I think people are pretty understanding. I've not come across much discrimination, most people in my year group at school knew about my diagnosis and nobody was ever mean to me about it. New people I meet actually go out of their way not to be mean about it, which can be funny.

(On a side note, "that makes me feel depressed" isn't offensive since depression is both an mental condition and an emotion that anybody can experience. The condition is named after the emotion.)



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i totally understand what you're saying and i think policing the use of labels would make it seem more serious, i never thought about it that way. i think for conditions such as autism, more people understand what it is than something like bpd, which helps.

also i think that is true, depression is an emotion, but for example i have a friend who says 'yeah i had depression that weekend' which i think is unreasonable. i think it depends what the context is, but i have a friend with clinical depression and she finds it slightly offensive and really irritating when people use it as a common adjective.
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InsertWittyName
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Honestly I've never really noticed any stigma around mental health issues personally. I spent ~5 months in a psych unit with severe depressive disorder (+ I was diagnosed w/ aspergers there & some other things) after trying to off myself and missed a fair few months of sixth form. Most of my friends (and a fair amount of people I weren't friends with) knew, + pretty much all of my extended family, some teaching staff, etc and no one seemed to treat me that much differently.

I think how people are treated is in some part down to how they project themselves and their problems- to me being suicidal & depressed w/e was just 'one of those things'; I didn't treat it as a big deal so for the most part I don't think the people I came into contact did either. If someone noticed all the scars on my arms for example I'd just make a stupid joke about it or shrug it off, and they wouldn't seem to think much of it.

I think there does need to be more of a balance between people accepting MH as medical problems as well as people taking responsibility for themselves rather than blaming everything on their condition (a few people I know, including me sometimes, have the tendency to do this- it doesn't do them any favours and it makes people see mental health conditions in a more negative light when people don't try hard enough to get on with their lives)

I think there is kind of a cycle where people fear the stigma surrounding MH problems so get very defensive/ emotional about it which means more people pay attention to it/think you're nuts so they're more likely to face a stigma, making people fear the stigma worse and starting the cycle over again.

Anyway, this post is actually quite a bit longer than I intended it to be so yeah, just my opinion.
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Tiger Rag
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Dunno why people are mentioning Aspergers. It's not a mental health condition.
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