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"Tucking the elbows in" for the bench press Watch

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    I have always struggled with the exact mechanics of this form, in terms of keeping the elbows tucked and always keeping a straight path with the bar when benching. I just want to know the best way to make sure the elbows are tucked in and what it should look like?
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    This is somewhat a debate that has been going on for a long time. Some people will say keep elbows tucked, move the bar in a straight line, others disagree.

    Here's a video of bill kazmaier (former bench world record holder and strongman winner). He teaches to tuck when lowering the bar then flare elbows when pressing. The bar also goes from his chest to over his face when he benches.

    He starts talking about this at 9:50.

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    (Original post by Last Day Lepers)
    This is somewhat a debate that has been going on for a long time. Some people will say keep elbows tucked, move the bar in a straight line, others disagree.

    Here's a video of bill kazmaier (former bench world record holder and strongman winner). He teaches to tuck when lowering the bar then flare elbows when pressing. The bar also goes from his chest to over his face when he benches.

    He starts talking about this at 9:50.

    Have you tried using this technique? It seems to be natural in terms of the movement. I feel like tucking my elbows in have been quite an unnatural feeling , like whenever I push the bar up near the top it is like my elbows want to flare out. Is it just me or is the whole benching with good technique thing quite difficult to learn? Like after watching these videos I see people benching in the gym and I literally just fear for their shoulders.


    From the look of this diagram, tucking the elbows in looks to basically mean keeping them closer to the body, but not too closely. So half the distance between the flared position and letting the elbows touch the body, a 45 degrees angle. . .

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    (Original post by Tom_Ford)
    Have you tried using this technique? It seems to be natural in terms of the movement. I feel like tucking my elbows in have been quite an unnatural feeling , like whenever I push the bar up near the top it is like my elbows want to flare out. Is it just me or is the whole benching with good technique thing quite difficult to learn? Like after watching these videos I see people benching in the gym and I literally just fear for their shoulders.


    From the look of this diagram, tucking the elbows in looks to basically mean keeping them closer to the body, but not too closely. So half the distance between the flared position and letting the elbows touch the body, a 45 degrees angle. . .

    Well what bill is saying is when lowering the bar you tuck the elbows, and touch your chest with the bar like in the lower picture. As your start to press, you begin pressing with tucked elbows and gradually start to flare so the bar goes from your chest to over your neck/face once you've locked out. I.e. up and back.

    The press essentially goes in 3 parts, you start the press from the chest using mainly your triceps muscles, then as your start press and the bar is off of the chest you start flaring and incorporate your delts. The final part uses tris, delts and chest.


    I do it this way and find it easier.
 
 
 
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