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    I want to know the path to becoming a medical malpractice lawyer in the uk. Can I study biomedical sciences and then a postgraduate law degree ... or .. what do i do?
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    Do any degree > apply for training contract to firms with clinical negligence practice area if want to be solicitor > do 1 year law conversion course (GDL) > do 1 year legal practice course (LPC) > do two year training contract, with hopefully a seat in clinical negligence > hope you can qualify into clinical negligence.

    If you do a law degree, then you skip the GDL step and you apply for the training contract at the end of your penultimate year of study.

    If you want to be a barrister in clinical negligence:

    Do any degree > do 1 year law conversion course (GDL) > apply to chambers with clinical negligence practice for pupillage (1 year) > do 1 year bar professional training course (BPTC) > do pupillage (1 year training) > get tenancy and practice.

    Same as above re: if you do law degree, skip GDL.

    that's it in a nutshell - getting a training contract or pupillage is the hard bit and you may not get them in your first year of application. you don't need a biomed / med related undergrad degree to practise clin neg - it may be seen as helpful, but plenty of practitioners go through a law degree. many LLB programmes offer optional modules in medical law & ethics, and if you really wanted, there are also LLM (masters) programmes in medical law & ethics.

    if i have made any errors, i hope someone will come along and correct me!
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    (Original post by arguendo)
    Do any degree > apply for training contract to firms with clinical negligence practice area if want to be solicitor > do 1 year law conversion course (GDL) > do 1 year legal practice course (LPC) > do two year training contract, with hopefully a seat in clinical negligence > hope you can qualify into clinical negligence.

    If you do a law degree, then you skip the GDL step and you apply for the training contract at the end of your penultimate year of study.

    If you want to be a barrister in clinical negligence:

    Do any degree > do 1 year law conversion course (GDL) > apply to chambers with clinical negligence practice for pupillage (1 year) > do 1 year bar professional training course (BPTC) > do pupillage (1 year training) > get tenancy and practice.

    Same as above re: if you do law degree, skip GDL.

    that's it in a nutshell - getting a training contract or pupillage is the hard bit and you may not get them in your first year of application. you don't need a biomed / med related undergrad degree to practise clin neg - it may be seen as helpful, but plenty of practitioners go through a law degree. many LLB programmes offer optional modules in medical law & ethics, and if you really wanted, there are also LLM (masters) programmes in medical law & ethics.

    if i have made any errors, i hope someone will come along and correct me!
    Just as a general tip for OP, it's generally a lot more secure to get a job with the firms defending clin neg claims, and said firms are usually more overall healthcare focussed (so their Real Estate team, Corporate team, Employment etc. all act for healthcare clients) than making them. Those firms form the NHSLA panel.

    http://www.thelawyer.com/in-house/pa...005494.article
 
 
 
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