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    Hi guys. I am considering which subjects I want to do for A levels.Currently the only subject I am sure about is Maths, my interests mainly consists into scientific subjects, but I like humanistic subjects too (not English though). My goal is to go to University abroad. Therefore I want to ask which A levels are internationally accepted? Which subjects will allow me to have a quite wide range of choices?
    Thanks in advance.
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    I don't think there's any subjects that will specifically help you move overseas. I've heard doing baccalaureate instead of A levels can help but not sure if that's ture.
    To keep a wide range do exactly that, keep the range!
    Maths is a good choice as most courses regardless tend to like it, but yeh what are you interested in mostly? If you're not moving schools or to a college then think about what teachers you like etc
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    (Original post by daljit97)
    Hi guys. I am considering which subjects I want to do for A levels.Currently the only subject I am sure about is Maths, my interests mainly consists into scientific subjects, but I like humanistic subjects too (not English though). My goal is to go to University abroad. Therefore I want to ask which A levels are internationally accepted? Which subjects will allow me to have a quite wide range of choices?
    Thanks in advance.
    All GCE A Levels are internationally recognised. However, there may be additional requirements. For instance, you will need to have taken the ACT/SAT for any US University or foreign language proficiency tests if you want to study in a non-english speaking country.

    What you need to do is actually research what you want to do. It's fine to take a contrasting subject, but just taking subjects for the sake of having a broad range is counterproductive. In your case, I'd suggest taking Maths, two or three of Chemistry, Physics, Biology & Further Maths, and optionally a final contrasting subjects if you want, like History or Geography. Avoid 'specialist' subjects like environmental science, psychology, etc.
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    A levels are internationally recognised. However, most countries do Baccalaureate style exams or at least they force students take a subject from each subject field. From what I know, UK is the only country where you specialise so damn early. This shows that a lot of countries see breadth important. So I would say IB may be a safer bet. However, I know an A level student who went to Harvard for maths by taking Maths, phyics, English literature and French A levels.

    On a side note, in my home cointry Japan, some universities don't accept A levels but every uni accepts IB. So you should check entry requirents before deciding on anything! (Surely you wouldnt go to Japan but you know)

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    (It isnt just the entry requirements - do you realise hw much an overseas Uni course would cost?)

    Regarding subjects : if you want to study the more human sciences then look at subjects like Geography, Environmental Science, Sociology.

    Useful advice about choosing A level subjects here : http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...-form_subjects
    And advice about deciding what subject to study at Uni : http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...sing_a_subject
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    Maths is quite an arbitrary choice if you have no certain reason for doing it. A universal set of A-levels to me would be Biology, Chemistry and History (add a fourth choice is you want to do 4 A2s). Because you can do pretty much all sciences (apart from physics of course) such as biochemistry, biology/chemistry etc and medicine if you wish to become a doctor. History will enable you to doing things like politics/international relations/history itself. History will also enable you to doing even law. That's a nice set of options to be honest.
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    Maths is quite an arbitrary choice if you have no certain reason for doing it.
    Actually I think Maths is probably the most "universal" subject, I think it is very useful for both technological and scientific fields.
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    I took the cores, so I did maths, chem, bio and eng lit. Eng lit was a nice contrast and gave me a break from the sciences. You could switch bio for another 'harder' science like physics? I'd just recommend sticking to the cores, seems like a good way to go

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    (Original post by zuzu096)
    I took the cores, so I did maths, chem, bio and eng lit. Eng lit was a nice contrast and gave me a break from the sciences. You could switch bio for anotjer 'harder' science like physics? I'd just recommend sticking to the cores, seems like a good way to go

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    ah my bad I just read you didn't like English haha oops in that case I agree with others, maybe history or geography? I know people who've said geography fits well with those options

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    (Original post by daljit97)
    Hi guys. I am considering which subjects I want to do for A levels.Currently the only subject I am sure about is Maths, my interests mainly consists into scientific subjects, but I like humanistic subjects too (not English though). My goal is to go to University abroad. Therefore I want to ask which A levels are internationally accepted? Which subjects will allow me to have a quite wide range of choices?
    Thanks in advance.
    Why don't you consider the International Barraculate?
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    (Original post by daljit97)
    Hi guys. I am considering which subjects I want to do for A levels.Currently the only subject I am sure about is Maths, my interests mainly consists into scientific subjects, but I like humanistic subjects too (not English though). My goal is to go to University abroad. Therefore I want to ask which A levels are internationally accepted? Which subjects will allow me to have a quite wide range of choices?
    Thanks in advance.
    I would do more well-regarded subjects and those which are broad rather than specific. Beyond that, I would go for what you enjoy. Perhaps, for example, physics, maths, history, geography, but there are a lot of combinations that would suit your ambitions well.
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    The International Baccalaureate diploma is recognized "universally", and you can study a range of subjects.
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    (Original post by mynameisntdoug)
    The International Baccalaureate diploma is recognized "universally", and you can study a range of subjects.
    Ok, I will consider. What are its requirements? Any good site where I can find more about it?
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    (Original post by daljit97)
    Ok, I will consider. What are its requirements? Any good site where I can find more about it?
    Do you know which colleges are local to you or which you're applying to? Take a look if they offer the IB. As for general info on it, you can find some here.
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    (Original post by mynameisntdoug)
    Do you know which colleges are local to you or which you're applying to? Take a look if they offer the IB. As for general info on it, you can find some here.
    I did some research and I found that there is one school really close to my house that offers IB. One thing I would like to ask is how is it organized? I mean is it more like college or school? And is it more difficult than A levels?
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    (Original post by daljit97)
    I did some research and I found that there is one school really close to my house that offers IB. One thing I would like to ask is how is it organized? I mean is it more like college or school? And is it more difficult than A levels?
    Ask the college and do your own research. I have not studied the IB but I can tell for certain that it's something which is internationally accepted, a friend of mine in Canada recently completed the diploma and is moving abroad in a year or two.
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    (Original post by daljit97)
    I did some research and I found that there is one school really close to my house that offers IB. One thing I would like to ask is how is it organized? I mean is it more like college or school? And is it more difficult than A levels?
    IB is just another level 3 qualification which happens to be more widely accepted abroad.

    There are two difficulties for eacj subject, Higher Level and Standard Level - think them as A2 and AS. To complete this qualification, you have to do:
    -Maths HL/SL or maths studies (easiest)
    -Two languages
    -A humanity such as geography, history economics
    -A science
    -An art or if you want you can do an extra science or humanity instad of -an art subject (music, art etc)

    In addition, you have to complete CAS thing, which is like Duke of Edinburgh and you need sport, community service and a skill.

    Also you have to write an extended essay of 6k words (?) and another essay called Theory of Knowledge which is a lot shorter.

    It seems a lot of work on paper and it in fact is according to IB students but A level is also a lot of work so. .

    Just search more about IB, if you can't research on your own you can't do Extended Essay effectively you know...

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    (Original post by zuzu096)
    I took the cores, so I did maths, chem, bio and eng lit. Eng lit was a nice contrast and gave me a break from the sciences. You could switch bio for another 'harder' science like physics? I'd just recommend sticking to the cores, seems like a good way to go
    Exactly what I did, but I did FM too and dropped EL in second year.

    To OP:

    Maths is definitely a good choice; it shows you're academic, and will help if you want to go into chemical engineering or something similar.

    If history doesn't float your boat, then your humanitarian subject could be another language? They're always a good choice
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    (Original post by Jooooshy)
    Exactly what I did, but I did FM too and dropped EL in second year.

    To OP:

    Maths is definitely a good choice; it shows you're academic, and will help if you want to go into chemical engineering or something similar.

    If history doesn't float your boat, then your humanitarian subject could be another language? They're always a good choice
    oooh awesome! you seem very mathsy then! what made you take lit? i actually dropped maths at A2, wouldve loved to carry on but I think I would have flunked hard.

    Marhs is always a good option, it's relevant to so many different subjects, so definitely the most universal in my eyes, but also the hardest
 
 
 
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