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Oxford or Cambridge for Law and do you reckon I have a chance to get in? Watch

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    So I decided I want to apply to an Oxbridge University; my University choices are Durham, UCL, Kings, Southampton (as a backup) and either Oxford or Cambridge, but I don't know which one.

    In my IGCSE's I got 5A* and 4As and for AS I am predicted 4As so far. I'm going to also do French A level and Greek AS during A2 and hopefully end up with 3A* and 2As if I work my socks off.

    I'm currently studying for the LNAT's which I'm going to take in September and I'm reading around the subject of law; about 10 books.

    I have DoE bronze and Silver, MEDIMUN 2 times, 1st and 2nd trumpet in the national youth orchestra , Prefect, Law work experience at both courts and a law firm and I'm going to apply for head boy.

    Any realistic chance if I could get in, or at least get an interview place and which one to choose? (I have looked into the courses and I like both)

    Any feedback would be awesome and I'd appreciate it, Thanks
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    (Original post by andreastitan)
    So I decided I want to apply to an Oxbridge University; my University choices are Durham, UCL, Kings, Southampton (as a backup) and either Oxford or Cambridge, but I don't know which one.

    In my IGCSE's I got 5A* and 4As and for AS I am predicted 4As so far. I'm going to also do French A level and Greek AS during A2 and hopefully end up with 3A* and 2As if I work my socks off.

    I'm currently studying for the LNAT's which I'm going to take in September and I'm reading around the subject of law; about 10 books.

    I have DoE bronze and Silver, MEDIMUN 2 times, 1st and 2nd trumpet in the national youth orchestra , Prefect, Law work experience at both courts and a law firm and I'm going to apply for head boy.

    Any realistic chance if I could get in, or at least get an interview place and which one to choose? (I have looked into the courses and I like both)

    Any feedback would be awesome and I'd appreciate it, Thanks


    Get your AS results if you get (85 ums+) in all three subjects then maybe start thinking about Oxbridge, even then, it will be hard to get an offer. Most Cambridge applicants have (90+ums) in all their AS levels, so my advice would be to wait and see. Btw hard work may not always result in A*'s especially in essay/language based subjects - so it's not a smart idea to predict yourself 3 A*'s - but it's a really good thing that your optimistic and are reading around the subject, your clearly passionate and if you get the marks necessary, your application will be strong, especially with the extra-reading/activities. Try and stay realistic though - my religious studies teacher told me that a couple of years ago- a student he taught achieved 9 A*'s at GCSE's and an average of 97 ums across 5 AS levels and also won a national essay competition - his essay on the philosophy of science was eventually published but got rejected by cambridge for their philosophy course, so went to UCL instead. And law is far more competitive than philosophy. So remember even if you don't get into oxbridge - durham/kings/ucl/southampton are still fantastic uni's which will lead to very good career prospects.
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    (Original post by ChocolateFace123)
    Get your AS results if you get (85 ums+) in all three subjects then maybe start thinking about Oxbridge, even then, it will be hard to get an offer. Most Cambridge applicants have (90+ums) in all their AS levels, so my advice would be to wait and see. Btw hard work may not always result in A*'s especially in essay/language based subjects - so it's not a smart idea to predict yourself 3 A*'s - but it's a really good thing that your optimistic and are reading around the subject, your clearly passionate and if you get the marks necessary, your application will be strong, especially with the extra-reading/activities. Try and stay realistic though - my religious studies teacher told me that a couple of years ago- a student he taught achieved 9 A*'s at GCSE's and an average of 97 ums across 5 AS levels and also won a national essay competition - his essay on the philosophy of science was eventually published but got rejected by cambridge for their philosophy course, so went to UCL instead. And law is far more competitive than philosophy. So remember even if you don't get into oxbridge - durham/kings/ucl/southampton are still fantastic uni's which will lead to very good career prospects.
    Oxford don't look at UMS I have read and the entry requirements are AAA (even though most applicants will have higher). Based on that don't you think Oxford would be more ideal? At the moment I'm more in favour of oxford due to the city etc, but theoretically lets say I achieve those grades do you think I have any chance for an interview?
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    (Original post by andreastitan)
    Oxford don't look at UMS I have read and the entry requirements are AAA (even though most applicants will have higher). Based on that don't you think Oxford would be more ideal? At the moment I'm more in favour of oxford due to the city etc, but theoretically lets say I achieve those grades do you think I have any chance for an interview?
    You need a good LNAT - 25+
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    (Original post by tehforum)
    You need a good LNAT - 25+
    I know!!! Working away at it, but based on the rest what is your opinion?
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    (Original post by andreastitan)
    I know!!! Working away at it, but based on the rest what is your opinion?
    Loads of things

    GCSEs, predictions, personal statement, submitted work

    but mostly, GCSEs and LNAT.
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    Cambridge look at the UMS score of your 3 best AS subjects and take the average. I think the average successful applicant got an average of 95% but don't quote me on that. You can look it up, it's online.

    I think you'd have a shot, but no-one can really tell you how likely you are to get in. My advice would be, if you don't have a particular preference for either, to base it on your AS results. If they're stellar, go for Cambridge. If not, Oxford.

    Don't be upset if they don't take you, because they get loads of amazing applications and the other unis you mentioned are excellent as well. Good luck
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    5 x IGSCE at A* is quite low for Oxbridge.

    PS: No one cares if you can play the trumpet.
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    (Original post by tengentoppa)
    Cambridge look at the UMS score of your 3 best AS subjects and take the average. I think the average successful applicant got an average of 95% but don't quote me on that. You can look it up, it's online.

    I think you'd have a shot, but no-one can really tell you how likely you are to get in. My advice would be, if you don't have a particular preference for either, to base it on your AS results. If they're stellar, go for Cambridge. If not, Oxford.

    Don't be upset if they don't take you, because they get loads of amazing applications and the other unis you mentioned are excellent as well. Good luck
    Thank you for the feedback and time! I'll try my best!
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    (Original post by ChocolateFace123)
    Get your AS results if you get (85 ums+) in all three subjects then maybe start thinking about Oxbridge, even then, it will be hard to get an offer. Most Cambridge applicants have (90+ums) in all their AS levels, so my advice would be to wait and see. Btw hard work may not always result in A*'s especially in essay/language based subjects - so it's not a smart idea to predict yourself 3 A*'s - but it's a really good thing that your optimistic and are reading around the subject, your clearly passionate and if you get the marks necessary, your application will be strong, especially with the extra-reading/activities. Try and stay realistic though - my religious studies teacher told me that a couple of years ago- a student he taught achieved 9 A*'s at GCSE's and an average of 97 ums across 5 AS levels and also won a national essay competition - his essay on the philosophy of science was eventually published but got rejected by cambridge for their philosophy course, so went to UCL instead. And law is far more competitive than philosophy. So remember even if you don't get into oxbridge - durham/kings/ucl/southampton are still fantastic uni's which will lead to very good career prospects.
    I really hate the expression "reading around the subject". What does "around" mean in this context ? And is the candidate required to know things not "taught" in class ? If so what ? Or is A level to be read not taught ? And are the books supplied /paid for by the school.
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    (Original post by Old_Simon)
    5 x IGSCE at A* is quite low for Oxbridge.

    PS: No one cares if you can play the trumpet.

    Quite low? Stop spreading misinformation.
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    (Original post by Old_Simon)
    5 x IGSCE at A* is quite low for Oxbridge.

    PS: No one cares if you can play the trumpet.
    So I read that oxford look at applicants that have between 4-7A* or higher. Considering that the A*'s were in the 90's % and the A's were a few marks off an A* it's okay.

    P.S. Playing a musical instrument actually is of some importance, as it exhibits a variety of different, strong skills that can be needed in law. Plus a Grade 5 in theory and Grade 7 in the instrument is actually useful.
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    (Original post by Old_Simon)
    I really hate the expression "reading around the subject". What does "around" mean in this context ? And is the candidate required to know things not "taught" in class ? If so what ? Or is A level to be read not taught ? And are the books supplied /paid for by the school.
    I checked the reading lists on the university sites and also some advice from lawyers etc. I'm reading some more advanced topics that are actually used in the BAR exams and also essentially learning about each aspect of the legal system.
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    (Original post by *Stefan*)
    Quite low? Stop spreading misinformation.
    That is misinformation how ?
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    (Original post by andreastitan)
    Oxford don't look at UMS I have read and the entry requirements are AAA (even though most applicants will have higher). Based on that don't you think Oxford would be more ideal? At the moment I'm more in favour of oxford due to the city etc, but theoretically lets say I achieve those grades do you think I have any chance for an interview?
    Oxford don't look at UMS scores - but if you have under 85 ums for your AS levels then you may have a hard time getting your teachers to predict you any A*'s - though you won't necessarily need A* predictions to get an interview, it will definently help. 36.9% of successful law applicants to oxford in 2012 achieved A*AA or worse - so straight A* predictions aren't necessary. That being said, oxford place more of an emphasis on GCSE grades than cambridge - so you may be at a slight disadvantage with 5 A*'s at GCSE, so if you get really high UMS it would be wiser to try for cambridge. Theoretically if you get those grades and do well on the LNAT and make a good impression at the interview, you stand as good a chance than anyone else. Remember though, don't fantasise about oxford - it's extremely competitive, luck often determines if you get a place as the academic aptitude of most applicants are the same. For the time being my advice would be to keep reading/preparing for the LNAT, and try writing a really impressive PS, you definently stand a chance.
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    (Original post by ChocolateFace123)
    Oxford don't look at UMS scores - but if you have under 85 ums for your AS levels then you may have a hard time getting your teachers to predict you any A*'s - though you won't necessarily need A* predictions to get an interview, it will definently help. 36.9% of successful law applicants to oxford in 2012 achieved A*AA or worse - so straight A* predictions aren't necessary. That being said, oxford place more of an emphasis on GCSE grades than cambridge - so you may be at a slight disadvantage with 5 A*'s at GCSE, so if you get really high UMS it would be wiser to try for cambridge. Theoretically if you get those grades and do well on the LNAT and make a good impression at the interview, you stand as good a chance than anyone else. Remember though, don't fantasise about oxford - it's extremely competitive, luck often determines if you get a place as the academic aptitude of most applicants are the same. For the time being my advice would be to keep reading/preparing for the LNAT, and try writing a really impressive PS, you definently stand a chance.
    Thanks a lot! I'll keep what you said in mind! I'm not fantasising I was just wondering whether it was worth it! Hopefully I get called to the interview
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    I might add that Law at Oxbridge attracts many of the cleverest students in the country. 5 x A* at GCSE is not even in the ball park.
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    (Original post by Old_Simon)
    I really hate the expression "reading around the subject". What does "around" mean in this context ? And is the candidate required to know things not "taught" in class ? If so what ? Or is A level to be read not taught ? And are the books supplied /paid for by the school.

    Sorry you dislike the expression but it means read about how law relates to other aspects of life - he could read into the philosophy of legislation, perhaps bring up the Leopold and Loeb case in the interview and speak about how questions regarding free-will/determinism influence our ability to enforce justice/punish a crime - something other applicants are unlikely to have picked up on. And yes these things are usually not taught in class, they are not related to the A-level syllabus which is why it will be all the more impressive, which he will need to be, to stand a chance of getting into Oxford.
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    (Original post by ChocolateFace123)
    Sorry you dislike the expression but it means read about how law relates to other aspects of life - he could read into the philosophy of legislation, perhaps bring up the Leopold and Loeb case in the interview and speak about how questions regarding free-will/determinism influence our ability to enforce justice/punish a crime - something other applicants are unlikely to have picked up on. And yes these things are usually not taught in class, they are not related to the A-level syllabus which is why it will be all the more impressive, which he will need to be, to stand a chance of getting into Oxford.
    Well reading "around" anything is not good English at all. Now your suggestion that students need reading beyond the syllabus is quite understandable. But do State School Pupils know this ? And where are these books to be found except in Winchester College library ? And why should an applicant who has no requirement to do Law at A level suddenly be reading stuff not on his syllabus when the entire ethos of his school is to get high grades in his/her A levels ad reduce to zero anything beyond that? Your suggestion is that candidates from independent schools who understand the dynamics of the class system and what "education" really entails are going to have a very substantial advantage.
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    (Original post by Old_Simon)
    I might add that Law at Oxbridge attracts many of the cleverest students in the country. 5 x A* at GCSE is not even in the ball park.
    5A* and 4As is more than respectable and although they look at GCSE grades they aren't of PARAMOUNT importance, also it's not based just on that,as the PS plays an integral role. You're making out as if it is 5 D's. Okay other applicants may have more A*, but that doesn't mean I won't be regarded, plus the A levels are the most important, which I forgot to mention, I'm taking History, Maths, French, Computing and Physics
 
 
 
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