Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    i just finished y9 and am going to start y10 in septemper - so GCSEs :/... I'm good at academic subjects like maths and sciences, but im unsure what field of work i want to go into. is it unusual to not know what area of work you want to go into? My older brother has wanted to be a doctor for a long time, and so my parents are slightly concerned that i dont know what i want to do in the future. Although it's a little early to know for sure what i want to do, i want to decide what field for example, business or medicine so i can look out for work experience opportunities.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    People get to the end of their degrees and have no idea what to do still. It's so common to not know what you want to do during school and college. Most people will end up in jobs they never really heard about - it's only when it's something so easy to see like medicine or law, do people really seem to be certain on things. Plus, having a complete plan at this age isn't that worthwhile, because you'll probably find you suddenly don't like a subject, or your feelings change. I was an absolute biology nerd in school, thought I had it all mapped out, until I got to A-level and realised I really disliked it as an academic subject.

    Go with what you enjoy, so obviously do as well as you can with all of your GCSEs. Do pick to your strengths though - and if you like maths and science then don't be afraid to pick them at A-level. There's a whole host of careers in science, and lots of cool stuff to be involved in, even if you're not sure what you'd like to do in the industries. If your school or college has any links with outreach programmes from university science departments then they are really cool to see what it's like studying it further.

    When picking your options, if you like lots of things, i'd start by ruling out all the things you definitely don't want to do. After that, you can look at the combinations and see what sort of paths it might take you.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    I'm doing my A levels right now and when I ask people about what they want to be and what they want to do after university or things, they just have absolutely no idea. They just do subjects they like and stuff, it's really common to not know what you want to do. It's probably more common to not know than to know.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Nymthae)
    People get to the end of their degrees and have no idea what to do still. It's so common to not know what you want to do during school and college. Most people will end up in jobs they never really heard about - it's only when it's something so easy to see like medicine or law, do people really seem to be certain on things. Plus, having a complete plan at this age isn't that worthwhile, because you'll probably find you suddenly don't like a subject, or your feelings change. I was an absolute biology nerd in school, thought I had it all mapped out, until I got to A-level and realised I really disliked it as an academic subject.

    Go with what you enjoy, so obviously do as well as you can with all of your GCSEs. Do pick to your strengths though - and if you like maths and science then don't be afraid to pick them at A-level. There's a whole host of careers in science, and lots of cool stuff to be involved in, even if you're not sure what you'd like to do in the industries. If your school or college has any links with outreach programmes from university science departments then they are really cool to see what it's like studying it further.

    When picking your options, if you like lots of things, i'd start by ruling out all the things you definitely don't want to do. After that, you can look at the combinations and see what sort of paths it might take you.

    Thanks for the advice, I'm going to just focus on doing the best that i can in my GCSEs for now

    When do you think i should start looking out for work experience opportunities?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by dance25)
    Thanks for the advice, I'm going to just focus on doing the best that i can in my GCSEs for now

    When do you think i should start looking out for work experience opportunities?
    Anytime! It's quite typical for schools to make you do a couple of weeks of work experience at the end of Year 10 though, so maybe just have a think about that and where you could go for then. Get settled with your GCSEs first, but then you can start contacting places to organise things for summer.

    If you think you can get any scientific-based placements at any point (chemical company etc.) then the best time to do that is probably in the summer after your AS levels. I've had a couple of work experience kids (Year 10, so ~15) at my workplace in the last couple of weeks, but there wasn't any real chemical knowledge for me to build on with them. I think they would have gotten more out of it later on. That said, anything at any point is better than nothing. It might help you make a decision earlier, so really just keep an eye out for it. See if your parents know anyone who works somewhere vaguely interesting etc.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Nymthae)
    Anytime! It's quite typical for schools to make you do a couple of weeks of work experience at the end of Year 10 though, so maybe just have a think about that and where you could go for then. Get settled with your GCSEs first, but then you can start contacting places to organise things for summer.

    If you think you can get any scientific-based placements at any point (chemical company etc.) then the best time to do that is probably in the summer after your AS levels. I've had a couple of work experience kids (Year 10, so ~15) at my workplace in the last couple of weeks, but there wasn't any real chemical knowledge for me to build on with them. I think they would have gotten more out of it later on. That said, anything at any point is better than nothing. It might help you make a decision earlier, so really just keep an eye out for it. See if your parents know anyone who works somewhere vaguely interesting etc.
    Thank you so much, your advice is very helpful
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
    Help with your A-levels

    All the essentials

    The adventure begins mug

    Student life: what to expect

    What it's really like going to uni

    Rosette

    Essay expert

    Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

    Uni match

    Uni match

    Our tool will help you find the perfect course for you

    Study planner

    Create a study plan

    Get your head around what you need to do and when with the study planner tool.

    Study planner

    Resources by subject

    Everything from mind maps to class notes.

    Hands typing

    Degrees without fees

    Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

    A student doing homework

    Study tips from A* students

    Students who got top grades in their A-levels share their secrets

    Study help links and info

    Can you help? Study help unanswered threadsRules and posting guidelines

    Sponsored content:

    HEAR

    HEAR

    Find out how a Higher Education Achievement Report can help you prove your achievements.

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.