How do you revise from different revision sources?

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student169
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This may sound stupid but I don't know how to successfully make revision notes, time efficiently, whilst gathering all detail required. When I have two revision guides, a textbook and a folder of class notes, how do you make succinct revision notes that are easy to revise from but cover all the details? Thanks in advance for any response.
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Old_Simon
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What are your thoughts / ideas ?
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student169
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(Original post by Old_Simon)
What are your thoughts / ideas ?
Maybe just make notes from a revision guide and add extra detail from textbook etc. I don't know if that'd be too time consuming though, or if it's classed as 'active revision'
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Gibber96
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(Original post by student169)
Maybe just make notes from a revision guide and add extra detail from textbook etc. I don't know if that'd be too time consuming though, or if it's classed as 'active revision'
I was in this position quite a lot with chemistry, revising from a textbook, revision guide, notes and the chemguide website. I tended to make good notes from the revision guide, then just embellish them with anything from the other sources that seemed particularly useful. It is time consuming but you end up with a really strong understanding of the material.
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Old_Simon
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IMHO virtually all notes/class notes/text books/ are missing one absolutely vital ingredient / component. That is to say a list of all the questions which can arise in that unit. Once you adopt that methodology you have a real tool to check your progress at the learning and at the revision stage. Stating the specification in the form of questions is a really powerful technique.
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student169
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(Original post by Gibber96)
I was in this position quite a lot with chemistry, revising from a textbook, revision guide, notes and the chemguide website. I tended to make good notes from the revision guide, then just embellish them with anything from the other sources that seemed particularly useful. It is time consuming but you end up with a really strong understanding of the material.
Thanks, it does sound like a really good idea to just consolidate all this material into some notes and produce further summaries
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student169
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(Original post by Old_Simon)
IMHO virtually all notes/class notes/text books/ are missing one absolutely vital ingredient / component. That is to say a list of all the questions which can arise in that unit. Once you adopt that methodology you have a real tool to check your progress at the learning and at the revision stage. Stating the specification in the form of questions is a really powerful technique.
I've never heard that one before but it's an excellent idea, I think it will really help with revision. It sounds really good to manipulate the specification points into questions so you know exactly what is required
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Old_Simon
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(Original post by student169)
I've never heard that one before but it's an excellent idea, I think it will really help with revision. It sounds really good to manipulate the specification points into questions so you know exactly what is required
It works for me. Here is an example which I made up: Devise a question sheet which tests a students (your) knowledge of differentiation in maths. You see how this works ? The first part of the challenge is knowing "what you need to know". Then your notes and test exercises just flow from that starting point. It really works.

Eg. Completely random example on subject I know nothing about: "How and why did William the Conqueror invade England with a force of circa only 8,000 men ?". The question is just as interesting as the answer.
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student169
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(Original post by Old_Simon)
It works for me. Here is an example which I made up: Devise a question sheet which tests a students (your) knowledge of differentiation in maths. You see how this works ? The first part of the challenge is knowing "what you need to know". Then your notes and test exercises just flow from that starting point. It really works.

Eg. Completely random example on subject I know nothing about: "How and why did William the Conqueror invade England with a force of circa only 8,000 men ?". The question is just as interesting as the answer.
Sorry, I'm a bit confused now, you've lost me haha
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Old_Simon
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(Original post by student169)
Sorry, I'm a bit confused now, you've lost me haha
Just convert whatever you need to know into questions which test that knowledge.
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