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Mathematics+ Further Mathematics books. Watch

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    Hello Would anybody possibly know what books (apart from the modular books) are good to have if studying Maths and Further Maths [Edexcel]? I have the modular books, however I'd like more books. Please could somebody recommend the best book/s to buy. Also, any other recourse recommendations are also welcomed. Thanks.
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    Further pure mathematics by bostock and chandler is pretty good
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    (Original post by MathMeister)
    Hello Would anybody possibly know what books (apart from the modular books) are good to have if studying Maths and Further Maths [Edexcel]? I have the modular books, however I'd like more books. Please could somebody recommend the best book/s to buy. Also, any other recourse recommendations are also welcomed. Thanks.
    Didn't you ask this question about a week ago

    You want Bostock & Chandler's 'Mathematics: The Core Course for A Level' plus the 'Further Pure Mathematics' book as suggested by the previous poster. Those will keep you busy for quite a while
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    I'm getting the idea that Bostock and Chandler books are the ones to get. Are they really that good? I've seen them on Amazon and they are like 300 pages long! The more maths the better.
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    (Original post by MathMeister)
    I'm getting the idea that Bostock and Chandler books are the ones to get. Are they really that good? I've seen them on Amazon and they are like 300 pages long! The more maths the better.
    B & C are top class. Also Teach yourself Calculus and Teach yourself Trigonometry well worth buying.
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    (Original post by Old_Simon)
    B & C are top class. Also Teach yourself Calculus and Teach yourself Trigonometry well worth buying.
    I've seen the B % C books on the internet (as a preview) and it seems as if it is purely maths without the lovely images like in the modular books. It also seems like the chapters are not in the same order as in the modular book- so do you have to search for the material you need in the books?
    Also don't you think it's rather strange that complex numbers is in the core and further pure maths books?
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    (Original post by MathMeister)
    I've seen the B % C books on the internet (as a preview) and it seems as if it is purely maths without the lovely images like in the modular books. It also seems like the chapters are not in the same order as in the modular book- so do you have to search for the material you need in the books?
    Also don't you think it's rather strange that complex numbers is in the core and further pure maths books?
    Well they are not modular books. Nor do they follow the exact order of any boards modules although the mapping is clearly provided. What they do give is a far more rigorous and comprehensive coverage of the topic shorn of pretty pictures and colours and - crucially - a much wider and deeper range of questions / exercises. And complex numbers are not in my core book at all.
    Your question started with the statement that you already possess the modular books. You now need more depth.
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    (Original post by Old_Simon)
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    Well, yes. However they are not exactly endorsed by Edexcel, so I suppose I'd need to ask my teachers whether they are good. Apparently, they also lack some content in the syllabus.
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    (Original post by MathMeister)
    Well, yes. However they are not exactly endorsed by Edexcel, so I suppose I'd need to ask my teachers whether they are good. Apparently, they also lack some content in the syllabus.
    I am beginning to think you are an undercover agent extolling the virtues of using the Pledger maths books exclusively. You came here asking for advice. Several people here suggested the same thing. Good luck.
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    (Original post by MathMeister)
    I've seen the B % C books on the internet (as a preview) and it seems as if it is purely maths without the lovely images like in the modular books. It also seems like the chapters are not in the same order as in the modular book- so do you have to search for the material you need in the books?
    Also don't you think it's rather strange that complex numbers is in the core and further pure maths books?
    You asked what books, specifically non-modular, are "good to have" if studying Maths and Further Maths. B&C are good to have and are not modular.

    The choice is yours: you can pay for pictures of fluffy clouds, flying cows, and ten lines of text per page OR you can pay for a couple of real maths books that are good value for money that you can use for reference years later (or sell on to future students).

    Complex numbers used to be introduced in Maths A Level and developed within Further Maths. The B&C books reflect this.
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    (Original post by davros)
    The choice is yours: you can pay for pictures of fluffy clouds, flying cows, and ten lines of text per page OR you can pay for a couple of real maths books that are good value for money that you can use for reference years later (or sell on to future students).
    I think that you're being overly harsh. I have a couple of the OCR textbooks, and I think that they're not too bad, and have a better treatment of some topics than B&C.
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    (Original post by atsruser)
    I think that you're being overly harsh. I have a couple of the OCR textbooks, and I think that they're not too bad, and have a better treatment of some topics than B&C.
    I'm sure there are better and worse examples of modular books, as in all things. But the OP seemed more concerned about the lack of "lovely images" than the real maths content

    And I would always put a comprehensive text book above a modular one out of principle - I just find the whole modular philosophy a very negative way to present maths.

    I know the old OCR MEI books used to have some seriously good content for Further Maths. Out of interest, where do you think B&C is weaker than the OCR books?
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    (Original post by davros)
    Out of interest, where do you think B&C is weaker than the OCR books?
    I'd have to dig them out and look through properly, but ISTR that I preferred the OCR treatment of Newton-Raphson and related topics, some of the graph sketching stuff, and integral-series inequalities. B&C is also looking a little dated in terms of consistent usage of set theoretic notation, and standard set names (\mathbb{R}, \mathbb{Q} etc).

    Overall B&C is hard to beat though.
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    (Original post by davros)
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    (Original post by Phoebe Buffay)
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    Is there a newer version of the Fp1 edexcel modular book? Or is there just the 2008 one?
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    (Original post by MathMeister)
    Is there a newer version of the Fp1 edexcel modular book? Or is there just the 2008 one?
    No idea, probably not.
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    (Original post by Phoebe Buffay)
    No idea, probably not.
    Does anybody know when the newer one is coming out? (surely there must be one some time in the future)
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    (Original post by MathMeister)
    Does anybody know when the newer one is coming out? (surely there must be one some time in the future)
    why? the specification hasn't changed since 2008, the maths hasn't changed.
    You are very unlikely to see any new text books for A level maths until the new syllabus that start in 2016.
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    (Original post by atsruser)
    I'd have to dig them out and look through properly, but ISTR that I preferred the OCR treatment of Newton-Raphson and related topics, some of the graph sketching stuff, and integral-series inequalities. B&C is also looking a little dated in terms of consistent usage of set theoretic notation, and standard set names (\mathbb{R}, \mathbb{Q} etc).

    Overall B&C is hard to beat though.
    That's fair enough. I've never been attracted to 'numerical methods' enough to worry about whether one book is better than another for things like Trapezium rule, Simpson's rule, Newton Raphson or the like

    And I have seen some good stuff in the old MEI books for integral/series estimation, you're right.

    Notation can certainly be an issue - I had a quick flick back to the beginning of B&C after your post and noticed they were insisting on using lg as an abbreviation for the base-10 logarithm
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    (Original post by davros)
    That's fair enough. I've never been attracted to 'numerical methods' enough to worry about whether one book is better than another for things like Trapezium rule, Simpson's rule, Newton Raphson or the like

    And I have seen some good stuff in the old MEI books for integral/series estimation, you're right.

    Notation can certainly be an issue - I had a quick flick back to the beginning of B&C after your post and noticed they were insisting on using lg as an abbreviation for the base-10 logarithm
    Trivial differences like old notation are fine if the student cross references with the supplied notation in the spec. It is not a bad thing to realise that multiple types of notation are not uncommon. It is handy knowing them in case you encounter them. It is also handy knowing your exam boards preference. Calculus is awash with examples. Incidentally Teach Yourself Calculus was written in circa 1910 and is still outstanding.
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    (Original post by Old_Simon)
    Trivial differences like old notation are fine if the student cross references with the supplied notation in the spec. It is not a bad thing to realise that multiple types of notation are not uncommon. It is handy knowing them in case you encounter them. It is also handy knowing your exam boards preference. Calculus is awash with examples. Incidentally Teach Yourself Calculus was written in circa 1910 and is still outstanding.
    I fully agree in principle - although a lot of today's students seem to be confused by one notation (how many people on here talk about log x as being "the log times the x"?!).


    (And I learned my calculus from Calculus Made Simple before I even knew what an A level was )
 
 
 
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