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A question on morality - did I do the right thing? Watch

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    Hello brothers and sisters!

    I have a question about what I did being the right, moral thing to do. After I did said action, I walked away from the situation with a spring in my step and my head held high, knowing viscerally that I had done the right thing, and that warm glow of moral righteousness permated me. But after having shared the brief tale with acquaintances, I have been absolutely shocked by some reactions, some making out what I did was completely IMmoral, so I'm looking for some other opinions.

    I volunteer at a care home for terminally ill senior citizens, where they go to live out the last of their days in peace. I had become quite close to a man called John - despite being in his late 70s and having a severe brain tumour, and even through the ravages of chemotherapy, he was always happy, laughing and joking, everyone in their loved him, and I thought he was great. Whether he was telling me stories about his service in WW2 or regaling me with some quirky anecdote, I always left my visits with him feeling positive - a guy like that being so positive and happy despite his situation, it was hard for his positivity not to rub off on others, and he seemed to have that effect on everyone in the home- he was much loved by staff and patients alike. His mind was totally intact, he was sharp as a knife, he still had that "spark in his eye", if you will.

    Anyway, when I visited him the time before last, he told me that he only had two weeks to live. Remarkably, he was still very positive, and instead of dying he talked of "going home" and seeing his wife again (he was quite religious) and was talking about how he'd lived a full, happy life, and he encouraged me to do the same, telling me about how if I lived very day to the full, that by the time I reached his age I wouldn't fear "passing on" either.

    The last time I visited him, which was six days after that, he seemed quite spaced out. I asked him if he was on any medication, and he explained to me that he didn't like the medication they gave him (he said it was called pethadine or something) and he explained with a smile and a wink that his grandson, at his request, had been bringing in some "alternate medication". When I pressed for details, he showed me a little box underneath his bed, that contained MS contin pills (which I have since found out is MORPHINE!) and CANNABIS! I was absolutely shocked and appalled. I tried to tell him the dangers of using drugs, but he politely dismissed me. I made some excuses and left.

    That night I was really troubled, not knowing what to do. I was thinking of telling the staff at the care home, but didn't know if they'd do anything and I didn't want to upset John. After much deliberation, I settled on calling the police, just telling them that a patient at the care home by the name of John was in possession of Class A and B drugs, and told the the room number.

    I visited the next day and everything was fine. I couldn't bring myself to tell John, so I just talked to him normally as per usual. The next day when I went I saw a police van outside, and as I got closer, I could see two police officers guiding John out of the hospital. This may have been my imagination, but he seemed to look totally different to anytime I've seen him in the entirety of my visitation.

    I knew that I'd done the right thing. I don't need to tell you about how terrible & dangerous drugs are, and after all, there are no grey areas in the law. Nice as he was, John was a law-breaker, and it's only right that he go through society's sanctions for breaking those laws. But, like I said earlier, some acquaintances of mine seem to think differently. What are your opinions?
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    In my personal opinion, you were 'wrong' to report him. Think about it: if it was you who was dying, and you knew there's absolutely nothing you could do to improve your health and prevent your inevitable death, would you not try to seek pleasure, especially if no other person was to be harmed?
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    I agree with Dima, to think he had less than two weeks then you go and call the police I feel is quite petty. However I can see your point of view because of the drugs. If it was me, I wouldn't have called the police. I would've turned a blind eye to it :')


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    Please tell me this is a joke. I partially don't believe this because I can't honestly see it happening.

    What an absolute busy body are you!!
    My dad has got terminal cancer and is in the last stages of life. He is on various pain meds but is always in constant agony despite this. He's recently started smoking the occasional joint for the pain. I normally wouldn't approve, but who am I to tell a dying man what to do?

    If you're serious...well done on ruining someones last weeks of life.
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    Sounds like a troll tbh
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    I really hope this isn't true.

    You asked for my honest opinion and here it is. I think your action was unfair, mean, and petty.

    The poor man had two weeks to live. He trusted you and confided you in his secret and you should have understood and let him be.

    Perhaps after he had died you could report his grandson if you really had to get the police involved, but the poor old man was almost 80 with a brain tumour and on his deathbed who was trying to make his last ever 2 weeks of life a little less painful and boring.

    I wouldn't want to be your friend. Would have to have eyes in the back of my head.
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    (Original post by jamez870)
    Sounds like a troll tbh
    hope so
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    I'm pretty appalled anyone would think the police would just arrest a man with days to live who isn't harming anyone! Obviously that didn't happen.

    Every law has its grey areas.
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    (Original post by RioFantastic)
    despite being in his late 70s...he was telling me stories about his service in WW2
    Even if he were 79, that would mean he was born in 1935, and so would have been 4-10 during WW2. I wonder what his service was? Playground monitor?
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    For me, I think that sometimes the right thing to do is not always the kind thing to do. And sometimes what's the most moral thing is different than the most lawful thing. I'm not stating that what you did was right but I'm not stating what you did was wrong either; but still, he was gonna die soon. Based on your account, he only had like 4 days left.

    And like Nexttime said, every law in existence have its grey areas.

    I'm not encouraging drug use, by the way, just saying.

    P.S.

    Sorry for the horrible grammar
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    Assuming this story is true, what you did was utterly wrong. Have a bit of empathy.

    Sounds like you'd make a perfect informant, you know the kind that waits at traffic lights to catch the registrations of vehicles that move a second too late.

    Some people have this irrational fascination at getting the police involved with absolutely everything.
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    Where I can understand where you were coming from in terms of the law, it was quite wrong to have a dying man arrested for possession of a drug that may have eased his well-being in the short-term.
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    I feel like this isn't true, but on the off-chance it was you acted like a bit of a prick. The man is dying soon anyway and what he puts in his body is none of your business.
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    You ****!

    The dude is on his last legs and he's using some drugs as a bit of medication (seriously, weed is an excellent painkiller) and you've ratted him out. You absolute douchebag!
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    You spoke about the dangers of drugs to a man who had two weeks to live? How are these dangers going to affect him exactly?

    Also as someone pointed out late seventies and WW2? Not happening I'm afraid.

    If this situation came about, a terminally ill man with a fortnight of life left was taking drugs, leave him alone. He's not hurting anyone else, his situation can't exactly get worse and the drug effects make his last days easier.
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    I don't think I believe this given him being in his "late seventies" yet somehow serving in WW2 at which point he would have been a kid. However I will ask hypothetically, what on earth were you hoping to achieve? Logically speaking if you said nothing, he'd die content, someone would find the drugs and trace the source or just get rid of them. You're supposed actions are literally no more than an act of cruelty towards a dying man.
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    A noble attempt at trolling. 8/10.
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    I think you were in the wrong. when he only has a week or two to live then let him do what he wants. He's not hurting anyone.
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    You're an *******, guy only had a few more days to live and you call the police over something so stupid. Now he's going to spend his last days in guilt worrying about the consequences his grandson will face for just trying to help him out and make sure he wasn't in pain.
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    Was it worth it? Letting a dying man spend his last days in a prison cell?
 
 
 
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