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    Hey guys, I'm from the UK.

    I'm currently working in a dead end job that isn't IT related.

    In my spare time I'm learning web design, but I've started that a few months ago and have just finished learning the basics of HTML and CSS.

    I want a job in IT but realise I need to learn the most valuable skills before I can realistically get a job.

    What skills would you say are most important and in demand? Baring in mind I'm working in a dead end job at the moment I'd be happy to master any skills that earns 15k+.

    Thanks Joe
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    What kind of job do you want? It's a seriously broad industry, even just web design is vague.
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    Well for starters, skills aren't everything. For an entry level job, employers aren't going to expect high proficiency in certain IT skills, someone applying for that type of job is likely to have very minimal exposure at best. Being able to show that you're an independent and quick learner, a good communicator and team player is just as important. If anything, examples of applying teamwork or having a list of projects that you've worked on and being able to talk about them to an interviewer will get you a long way, far more so than just listing a ton of skills on the CV and not relating them to anything.

    An example of a popular way of entering this industry is writing an android application or creating websites for clients, friends & family. You will be expected to be able to talk about the processes and technologies involved, such as comparing technologies, why you believed technology X was right for the job. How did you deal with your customer? How smooth was the delivery? Etc.

    If I had to say a few skills which are good to have nowadays... The number of asterisks out of 5 represent how much I think the skill will benefit you or increases your chances of being successfully offered an entry level / junior role (basically try and hit as many of these as you can and you wouldn't be far off securing a job)

    - I would say having a basic understanding of Agile methodologies such as Scrum and Kanban would be impressive and would be a quick win in an interview. *****
    - Javascript is also rising in popularity and a familiarity with AngularJS and backboneJS would be beneficial **
    - Knowledge-of and being able to use Linux is also a quick win. ***
    - Familiarity with at least one scripting language ***
    - Familiarity with at least one unit testing framework *****
    - Familiarity with at least one integration testing framework ****
    - Understanding of software architectures, multi-tier, RESTful, Cloud based, client-server, peer to peer. **
    - Basic computer science knowledge (not uncommon for interview questions to ask you to implement a sorting algorithm) ***
    - Familiarity with one database management system. Popular ones are MySQL & Oracle *****
    - Familiarity with the commonly used protocols: UDP/TCP/IP/HTTP/ ***
    - Be able to use Regex ****
    - Know what MVC stands for / means (I know many people who have failed interviews for being unable to answer this basic question) *****
    - Know what 'Object Oriented Programming' is. Coherence vs separation of concerns, etc. *****
    - Basic idea of how to write 'clean code'. i.e, Refactoring techniques, readability, reusability ****
    - Understanding of Dependency Injection **
    - Understanding of how to use an API ****
    - Understanding of how to manipulate JSON or XML ****
    - Awareness / Understanding of Extreme Programming principles such as TDD, Pair Programming, Continuous integration, Refactoring, Planning Games *****

    In no way does an employer expect you to be a master of any/all of these skills (you'll pick them up as you work, don't worry). What I'm saying is, a familiarity with these skills and being able to talk about them is already a massive boost over other entry level candidates. The best part? Other than the javascript/scripting skill which takes a lot of time, they're pretty easy to understand given a little bit of home googling. Quick wins and sure way to get yourself into the industry if I say so myself
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    If you working with people it has to be emotional intelligence. You can have as high a grades as you like but if you don't know how to interact with others then you are stumped.
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    (Original post by NX172)
    Well for starters, skills aren't everything. For an entry level job, employers aren't going to expect high proficiency in certain IT skills, someone applying for that type of job is likely to have very minimal exposure at best. Being able to show that you're an independent and quick learner, a good communicator and team player is just as important. If anything, examples of applying teamwork or having a list of projects that you've worked on and being able to talk about them to an interviewer will get you a long way, far more so than just listing a ton of skills on the CV and not relating them to anything.

    An example of a popular way of entering this industry is writing an android application or creating websites for clients, friends & family. You will be expected to be able to talk about the processes and technologies involved, such as comparing technologies, why you believed technology X was right for the job. How did you deal with your customer? How smooth was the delivery? Etc.

    If I had to say a few skills which are good to have nowadays... The number of asterisks out of 5 represent how much I think the skill will benefit you or increases your chances of being successfully offered an entry level / junior role (basically try and hit as many of these as you can and you wouldn't be far off securing a job)

    - I would say having a basic understanding of Agile methodologies such as Scrum and Kanban would be impressive and would be a quick win in an interview. *****
    - Javascript is also rising in popularity and a familiarity with AngularJS and backboneJS would be beneficial **
    - Knowledge-of and being able to use Linux is also a quick win. ***
    - Familiarity with at least one scripting language ***
    - Familiarity with at least one unit testing framework *****
    - Familiarity with at least one integration testing framework ****
    - Understanding of software architectures, multi-tier, RESTful, Cloud based, client-server, peer to peer. **
    - Basic computer science knowledge (not uncommon for interview questions to ask you to implement a sorting algorithm) ***
    - Familiarity with one database management system. Popular ones are MySQL & Oracle *****
    - Familiarity with the commonly used protocols: UDP/TCP/IP/HTTP/ ***
    - Be able to use Regex ****
    - Know what MVC stands for / means (I know many people who have failed interviews for being unable to answer this basic question) *****
    - Know what 'Object Oriented Programming' is. Coherence vs separation of concerns, etc. *****
    - Basic idea of how to write 'clean code'. i.e, Refactoring techniques, readability, reusability ****
    - Understanding of Dependency Injection **
    - Understanding of how to use an API ****
    - Understanding of how to manipulate JSON or XML ****
    - Awareness / Understanding of Extreme Programming principles such as TDD, Pair Programming, Continuous integration, Refactoring, Planning Games *****

    In no way does an employer expect you to be a master of any/all of these skills (you'll pick them up as you work, don't worry). What I'm saying is, a familiarity with these skills and being able to talk about them is already a massive boost over other entry level candidates. The best part? Other than the javascript/scripting skill which takes a lot of time, they're pretty easy to understand given a little bit of home googling. Quick wins and sure way to get yourself into the industry if I say so myself
    Great post.

    I certainly learnt a lot of these skills after working in industry. So a final point, get industrial experience during your degree if you can!
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    (Original post by NX172)
    Well for starters, skills aren't everything. For an entry level job, employers aren't going to expect high proficiency in certain IT skills, someone applying for that type of job is likely to have very minimal exposure at best. Being able to show that you're an independent and quick learner, a good communicator and team player is just as important. If anything, examples of applying teamwork or having a list of projects that you've worked on and being able to talk about them to an interviewer will get you a long way, far more so than just listing a ton of skills on the CV and not relating them to anything.

    An example of a popular way of entering this industry is writing an android application or creating websites for clients, friends & family. You will be expected to be able to talk about the processes and technologies involved, such as comparing technologies, why you believed technology X was right for the job. How did you deal with your customer? How smooth was the delivery? Etc.

    If I had to say a few skills which are good to have nowadays... The number of asterisks out of 5 represent how much I think the skill will benefit you or increases your chances of being successfully offered an entry level / junior role (basically try and hit as many of these as you can and you wouldn't be far off securing a job)

    - I would say having a basic understanding of Agile methodologies such as Scrum and Kanban would be impressive and would be a quick win in an interview. *****
    - Javascript is also rising in popularity and a familiarity with AngularJS and backboneJS would be beneficial **
    - Knowledge-of and being able to use Linux is also a quick win. ***
    - Familiarity with at least one scripting language ***
    - Familiarity with at least one unit testing framework *****
    - Familiarity with at least one integration testing framework ****
    - Understanding of software architectures, multi-tier, RESTful, Cloud based, client-server, peer to peer. **
    - Basic computer science knowledge (not uncommon for interview questions to ask you to implement a sorting algorithm) ***
    - Familiarity with one database management system. Popular ones are MySQL & Oracle *****
    - Familiarity with the commonly used protocols: UDP/TCP/IP/HTTP/ ***
    - Be able to use Regex ****
    - Know what MVC stands for / means (I know many people who have failed interviews for being unable to answer this basic question) *****
    - Know what 'Object Oriented Programming' is. Coherence vs separation of concerns, etc. *****
    - Basic idea of how to write 'clean code'. i.e, Refactoring techniques, readability, reusability ****
    - Understanding of Dependency Injection **
    - Understanding of how to use an API ****
    - Understanding of how to manipulate JSON or XML ****
    - Awareness / Understanding of Extreme Programming principles such as TDD, Pair Programming, Continuous integration, Refactoring, Planning Games *****

    In no way does an employer expect you to be a master of any/all of these skills (you'll pick them up as you work, don't worry). What I'm saying is, a familiarity with these skills and being able to talk about them is already a massive boost over other entry level candidates. The best part? Other than the javascript/scripting skill which takes a lot of time, they're pretty easy to understand given a little bit of home googling. Quick wins and sure way to get yourself into the industry if I say so myself
    Adding to this, for more firmware/hardware related stuff C family languages are pretty much a must along with a basic understanding of electronics, and a better knowledge if computer science. The company I work for gives a short written test as well as the interview and a new hire got in because even though he flunked his interview he aced the test which had some truly horrific questions about recursion that nobody has ever completed under test conditions.
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    (Original post by NX172)
    Well for starters, skills aren't everything. For an entry level job, employers aren't going to expect high proficiency in certain IT skills, someone applying for that type of job is likely to have very minimal exposure at best. Being able to show that you're an independent and quick learner, a good communicator and team player is just as important. If anything, examples of applying teamwork or having a list of projects that you've worked on and being able to talk about them to an interviewer will get you a long way, far more so than just listing a ton of skills on the CV and not relating them to anything.

    An example of a popular way of entering this industry is writing an android application or creating websites for clients, friends & family. You will be expected to be able to talk about the processes and technologies involved, such as comparing technologies, why you believed technology X was right for the job. How did you deal with your customer? How smooth was the delivery? Etc.

    If I had to say a few skills which are good to have nowadays... The number of asterisks out of 5 represent how much I think the skill will benefit you or increases your chances of being successfully offered an entry level / junior role (basically try and hit as many of these as you can and you wouldn't be far off securing a job)

    - I would say having a basic understanding of Agile methodologies such as Scrum and Kanban would be impressive and would be a quick win in an interview. *****
    - Javascript is also rising in popularity and a familiarity with AngularJS and backboneJS would be beneficial **
    - Knowledge-of and being able to use Linux is also a quick win. ***
    - Familiarity with at least one scripting language ***
    - Familiarity with at least one unit testing framework *****
    - Familiarity with at least one integration testing framework ****
    - Understanding of software architectures, multi-tier, RESTful, Cloud based, client-server, peer to peer. **
    - Basic computer science knowledge (not uncommon for interview questions to ask you to implement a sorting algorithm) ***
    - Familiarity with one database management system. Popular ones are MySQL & Oracle *****
    - Familiarity with the commonly used protocols: UDP/TCP/IP/HTTP/ ***
    - Be able to use Regex ****
    - Know what MVC stands for / means (I know many people who have failed interviews for being unable to answer this basic question) *****
    - Know what 'Object Oriented Programming' is. Coherence vs separation of concerns, etc. *****
    - Basic idea of how to write 'clean code'. i.e, Refactoring techniques, readability, reusability ****
    - Understanding of Dependency Injection **
    - Understanding of how to use an API ****
    - Understanding of how to manipulate JSON or XML ****
    - Awareness / Understanding of Extreme Programming principles such as TDD, Pair Programming, Continuous integration, Refactoring, Planning Games *****

    In no way does an employer expect you to be a master of any/all of these skills (you'll pick them up as you work, don't worry). What I'm saying is, a familiarity with these skills and being able to talk about them is already a massive boost over other entry level candidates. The best part? Other than the javascript/scripting skill which takes a lot of time, they're pretty easy to understand given a little bit of home googling. Quick wins and sure way to get yourself into the industry if I say so myself
    Hi i just finished my a-levels and i have to apply to university for next year and i'm thinking of doing Computer Science. Please tell me they teach you that stuff on the list at uni?
    Any websites, tips, books, videos, online courses or advice on how i can check those things on that list off, or in general, anything i can do out side uni so that I can be more employable within the next 4/5 years after i god willing finish my computer science degree and start looking for work? From what i hear, they really don't teach you much programming at university unless you go somewhere like Cambridge/Imperial Please reply, from a teen who ain't got a clue about anything career related...

    By the way, what is it you do btw? Work/study? and where? (if you don't mind sharing that info of-course).

    Thank you!
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    (Original post by bakedbeans247)
    Hi i just finished my a-levels and i have to apply to university for next year and i'm thinking of doing Computer Science. Please tell me they teach you that stuff on the list at uni?
    Any websites, tips, books, videos, online courses or advice on how i can check those things on that list off, or in general, anything i can do out side uni so that I can be more employable within the next 4/5 years after i god willing finish my computer science degree and start looking for work? From what i hear, they really don't teach you much programming at university unless you go somewhere like Cambridge/Imperial Please reply, from a teen who ain't got a clue about anything career related...

    By the way, what is it you do btw? Work/study? and where? (if you don't mind sharing that info of-course).

    Thank you!
    You should take a look at harvard's CS50 course. It's an entry level computer science course that you can do online but it's definitely worth a go and you'll be able to see if you even want to continue with it at uni.
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    The only skill you have to study is time management other skills you get from your current job from your team leader on the basis of your training. When you join other company hey only ask about your time period of experience if they are ready to give sufficient training.
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    (Original post by bakedbeans247)
    Hi i just finished my a-levels and i have to apply to university for next year and i'm thinking of doing Computer Science. Please tell me they teach you that stuff on the list at uni?
    Any websites, tips, books, videos, online courses or advice on how i can check those things on that list off, or in general, anything i can do out side uni so that I can be more employable within the next 4/5 years after i god willing finish my computer science degree and start looking for work? From what i hear, they really don't teach you much programming at university unless you go somewhere like Cambridge/Imperial Please reply, from a teen who ain't got a clue about anything career related...

    By the way, what is it you do btw? Work/study? and where? (if you don't mind sharing that info of-course).

    Thank you!
    Universities don't teach you that much, they just say do something and you are expected to teach yourself.
 
 
 
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