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    (Original post by SamTheMan)
    I love the way Americans can never spell words properly. The write "Jewelry" or "Shepard" without giving it a second thought. They can't pronounce names of countries like Iraq. Most of them were still saying "Eye-rack" a while ago and some still do. But I think it's all part of their charm.
    Did I rattle your cage a little? I wasn't trying to and I can sense some sarcasm in your message. Just because some people don't spell and pronounce words the same way you do does not necessarily make it improper.

    Oh, and how do you spell Jewelry and why do you think it's improper?
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    OI. I hate debates like this.
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    (Original post by Made in the USA)
    Did I rattle your cage a little? I wasn't trying to and I can sense some sarcasm in your message. Just because some people don't spell and pronounce words the same way you do does not necessarily make it improper.

    Oh, and how do you spell Jewelry and why do you think it's improper?
    jewellery

    and it's considered improper because Webster just made up american spelling so that it would be different to english spelling.
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    Well when in Edinburgh everyone thinks I am English due to my accent, but when I go "down sarf" people seem to recognise it as Scottish. I wish I had an Edinburgh accent though, they are amazing - very clipped and posh. I read some article a while back that said Glaswegian was becoming the Scottish equivalent of Estuary English, but it doesn't seem to have invaded here yet.
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    (Original post by sashh)
    jewellery

    and it's considered improper because Webster just made up american spelling so that it would be different to english spelling.
    Language is always evolving. Old English is very different than modern English. Our accents are a little different and so is our spelling and grammar, but both of us would be incomprehensible and "improper" in the shakespearean era.
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    (Original post by magicalsausage)
    Well when in Edinburgh everyone thinks I am English due to my accent, but when I go "down sarf" people seem to recognise it as Scottish. I wish I had an Edinburgh accent though, they are amazing - very clipped and posh. I read some article a while back that said Glaswegian was becoming the Scottish equivalent of Estuary English, but it doesn't seem to have invaded here yet.
    Having lived in many countries (England, France, Israel, Greece and Puerto Rico!) I have learnt a number of languages. This makes my accent a very odd mix - well I don't think it's odd but whatever language I speak someone says they can detect a different accent in me! Sometimes I feel like I don't really have a mother tongue which can be very annoying! I wish I had one of those beautiful RP accents that they speak down here in Sussex!
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    (Original post by Made in the USA)
    Language is always evolving. Old English is very different than modern English. Our accents are a little different and so is our spelling and grammar, but both of us would be incomprehensible and "improper" in the shakespearean era.
    well there wasn't standard spelling in Shakespeare's time.

    English has more lexical items than any other language, probably due to the number of borrowings from other languages.

    I find it quite amusing that Webster changed the spelling of so many words of foreign origin, either as a political statement or because he believed the spelling should reflect the pronounciation.

    Can you imagine that happening today? eg if Australia becomes a republic can you imagine some australian saying "Ok lets change the standard spelling of all words in the English language that aren't spelled the way we say them". It just wouldn't happen. Or maybe it would.
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    The "thing" about British accents is simple to explain. There are so many of them! Put someone from London, Cornwall, Manchester, Liverpool, Yorkshire and Newcastle in the same room and you would think they come from different countries! I guess I have what you would describe as the stereotypical British accent, all Americans I have met at LSE instantly know I am "british" because of how i speak. Thats the thing about LSE, there's as many accents as there are students to have them!
 
 
 
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