Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I recently read through the comments following an article in the telegraph.
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/j...-to-shine.html

    It is full of page after page after page of people droneing on about the attitudes of young people and graduates and how a degree is worthless.

    Common comments which come up again and again are.

    1)
    That any degree except for one which is perceived as training you for a very specific job is entirely pointless and will not help you in the job market at all. In this particular forum Engineering is repeatedly hailed as a great degree to get. Many other subjects are talked about as if they are pointless. Its not just the usual "Micky mouse" degrees such a media studies which are listed - History, English, Law, Physics, Biology and even Maths are quoted and being useless.

    Worse still many of these posts seam to think that anyone who does a degree has done something wrong.

    2)
    Constant comments about young people and graduates being lazy, thinking they are entitled to a good job, not having enough "grit". amount other things.

    In both of these cases hate filled words and "buzz phrases" are constantly used.
    Lazy, whinging, scum, "think they are entitled" all come to mind.

    and anyone who try to say anything in defense of education (very few) are promptly insulted and subject to character assassination posts.

    Does this forum really show an accurate view of attitudes toward education and young people in this country.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    It just shows people`s opinions, but there is some truth to it. Im not saying a degree is worthless, but we`ve come to the point where everyone has a degree nowadays, so employers can no longer use that to decide which candidates to take on. Thus, experience is more recommended. But a degree does open pathways to experience, as well as other career opportunities that you couldnt get elsewhere such as societies related to the degree, where there may be guest talks by influential speakers in that field. But a degree is useful, especially in certain subjects such as Accounting where you learn the things you may use in the workplace.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Yes, the truth is usually somewhere in the middle.

    True, the opening up of education has increased the number of graduates leaving our universities with degree subjects that are over-saturated in terms of specific job prospects. However, the flip-side of this is that the graduate job market is very, very tough at the moment and it is far harder to get a graduate job now than it was for many of the critics above and below the line in this article linked.

    The idea that if one studied a 'proper' degree such as science or engineering then you would just walk into a job is palpably false - many skills gaps are for those who already have experience and many companies, just emerging from recession are reluctant to invest heavily in recent graduates and recruitment freezes are still in force in many areas.

    Yes, some young people probably need to make better choices, but then they need to have better advice. Careers guidance is pretty poor in my experience and schools are oddly reluctant to get expert opinions from people who actually do jobs because it takes a bit of time and effort to get events organised. However, this is on a background of a global economic crash that has really damaged young people in particular with high unemployment rates in the young a typical symptom of many economies across the world. No amount of grit or determination will get you a job if there simply isn't one available.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Those who comment on the Telegraph often seem to have a stick up their backside, believing that it was tougher in their day and that youngsters are "entitled". The reality is that graduates today pay thousands of pounds to go into a saturated labour market whereas in their day it was free and very few went to uni.

    One comment in particular that made me laugh was

    "I will back that story up. My wife who never went to university works as a PA to top legal solicitor. She sees hundreds of application for law students. Their C.V's and introduction letters are appalling.
    They lack basic grammar, and the spelling is atrocious.
    And these are the ones who have a degree already."

    How that man has the temerity to criticise the grammar of other people is beyond me.

    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Not only is experience recommended, but you actually need to be personable.

    I think qualities like seizing the initiative, not having to be directed, working to deadlines and the like are just as important as what you know. University equips you with all the aforementioned.
    • Community Assistant
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by megaman70)
    I recently read through the comments following an article in the telegraph.
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/j...-to-shine.html

    It is full of page after page after page of people droneing on about the attitudes of young people and graduates and how a degree is worthless.

    Common comments which come up again and again are.

    1)
    That any degree except for one which is perceived as training you for a very specific job is entirely pointless and will not help you in the job market at all. In this particular forum Engineering is repeatedly hailed as a great degree to get. Many other subjects are talked about as if they are pointless. Its not just the usual "Micky mouse" degrees such a media studies which are listed - History, English, Law, Physics, Biology and even Maths are quoted and being useless.

    Worse still many of these posts seam to think that anyone who does a degree has done something wrong.

    2)
    Constant comments about young people and graduates being lazy, thinking they are entitled to a good job, not having enough "grit". amount other things.

    In both of these cases hate filled words and "buzz phrases" are constantly used.
    Lazy, whinging, scum, "think they are entitled" all come to mind.

    and anyone who try to say anything in defense of education (very few) are promptly insulted and subject to character assassination posts.

    Does this forum really show an accurate view of attitudes toward education and young people in this country.
    I agree with you but in todays world education is geared around employment.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Will you be richer or poorer than your parents?
    Useful resources
    Uni match

    Applying to uni?

    Our tool will help you find the perfect course

    Articles:

    Debate and current affairs guidelinesDebate and current affairs wiki

    Quick link:

    Educational debate unanswered threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.