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Dentist payment Watch

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    Hey, I'm 19 and need to go to the dentist, I think I need a tooth pulling out because its quite sore. But how do I pay for it I've just finished Alevels and about to go uni, and my parents paying is no option. I really wanted a new tooth putting in or something? Please help what do I do?
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    Go on benefits, then your treatment will be free. That's how screwed the UK is.
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    Are you registered with a dentist? I'm assuming not. You could always try and find/register with an NHS dentist if you can find one and the treatment will be free. NHS dentists are not particularly common these days though.

    Failing that you could potentially go to your GP and explain, potentially getting some prescription pain killers. If I were you I would also start to brush, floss and use alcohol mouthwash 2-3 times a day. Sometimes tooth pains will go away and things like gingivitis (gum infection) are treatable with alcohol mouthwash and some loving care.
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    (Original post by Amphiprion)
    Are you registered with a dentist? I'm assuming not. You could always try and find/register with an NHS dentist if you can find one and the treatment will be free. NHS dentists are not particularly common these days though.

    Failing that you could potentially go to your GP and explain, potentially getting some prescription pain killers. If I were you I would also start to brush, floss and use alcohol mouthwash 2-3 times a day. Sometimes tooth pains will go away and things like gingivitis (gum infection) are treatable with alcohol mouthwash and some loving care.
    I do have a dentist, but I haven't been since I turned 19 a few months ago. I'm sure you still have to pay with NHS dentists? And I simply don't have the money too which sucks.
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    (Original post by ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈)
    Go on benefits, then your treatment will be free. That's how screwed the UK is.
    Seriously? Would I actually be able for like a month until results day?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I do have a dentist, but I haven't been since I turned 19 a few months ago. I'm sure you still have to pay with NHS dentists? And I simply don't have the money too which sucks.
    I don't see an NHS dentist and havent since I was a kid and my parents were in charge so I can't say I 100%, from experience, know for sure NHS dentists are free. However, surgery of any other kind on the NHS is free so I see no reason why you'd be made to pay for NHS dentistry.

    See your GP about it. That's free, if it's really bad you may get referred to an NHS dentist anyway? I really don't know. I think the GP is your best bet if you cannot afford a dentist.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Seriously? Would I actually be able for like a month until results day?

    Yes, you would.

    You're unemployed and looking for work. Claim JSA for a month, then get free dental care.

    http://www.nhs.uk/chq/Pages/1786.aspx?CategoryID=74


    Personally I disagree, but it's a solution to your problem.
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    (Original post by Amphiprion)
    I don't see an NHS dentist and havent since I was a kid and my parents were in charge so I can't say I 100%, from experience, know for sure NHS dentists are free. However, surgery of any other kind on the NHS is free so I see no reason why you'd be made to pay for NHS dentistry.

    See your GP about it. That's free, if it's really bad you may get referred to an NHS dentist anyway? I really don't know. I think the GP is your best bet if you cannot afford a dentist.
    You still have to pay with an NHS dentist, but the rates are cheaper as I think the NHS subsidises it.

    A GP can't help you with teeth problems, you'll just be told to go to a dentist. I had problems with my jaw sticking and they said that was a dentist problem too, didn't even try to prescribe/recommend anything.
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    (Original post by lamyers1)
    You still have to pay with an NHS dentist, but the rates are cheaper as I think the NHS subsidises it.

    A GP can't help you with teeth problems, you'll just be told to go to a dentist. I had problems with my jaw sticking and they said that was a dentist problem too, didn't even try to prescribe/recommend anything.
    In that case. OP you should really just start to brush PROPERLY (use an electric toothbrush if you can), floss and use alcohol mouthwash 2-3 times a day. Also avoid fizzy drinks and fruit juices, get sugar free squash (it's cheap too).

    It may not help but it's better than doing nothing.
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    (Original post by ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈)
    Go on benefits, then your treatment will be free. That's how screwed the UK is.
    You can't go on benefits if you are a student..
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    (Original post by ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈)
    Yes, you would.

    You're unemployed and looking for work. Claim JSA for a month, then get free dental care.

    http://www.nhs.uk/chq/Pages/1786.aspx?CategoryID=74


    Personally I disagree, but it's a solution to your problem.
    You can't go on benefits when you are a student... You have to wait until the current Academic year ends which is the August 31st but by then you should already be enrolled with the university you are going to.
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    If you claim JSA you will be able to get free dental treatment.

    Aside from that, you can fill in an HC1 form which you can order here: https://apps.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/LISWebAppStaticData/begin.do or get from your local jobcentre. It will take time for it to be assessed as to whether you should get free treatment but you can claim back what you've paid for.

    You could also look at whether there is treatment available at any local dental schools as this is often free.

    Emergency treatment in some areas is also sometimes free (but you have to be in really serious pain, not just 'sore' to use those)-for example where I live it's free if you go to the emergency dental clinic at the hospital, although it means having to go in early and waiting most of the day. Otherwise it would be £18 for emergency treatment. So it's worth keeping that in mind and looking into what services are available in your area if it gets worse and you're in a fix,

    You don't know what might need doing yet though-you may only need a filling or a root canal. All of these (or getting a tooth removed) would only cost £50 for the whole course of treatment (although it could potentially be £219 if for example, you needed a porcelain filling or crown after a root canal). You could always make a first appointment and see whether you can afford the treatment course they think you need (you would have to pay an £18 charge probably for the appointment if you didn't go ahead with the treatment-otherwise it'd be included in the whole course price).

    If it did turn out you needed a tooth extracted though, you most certainly will not get a false tooth on the NHS. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by simplylldxo)
    You can't go on benefits when you are a student... You have to wait until the current Academic year ends which is the August 31st but by then you should already be enrolled with the university you are going to.
    You only actually become enrolled as a student at a tertiary education institute when you turn up and physically enroll - This is also when SFE (or equivalent) is informed.

    Also, the academic year varies, for example, mine ended on the 17th June.
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    (Original post by ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈)
    You only actually become enrolled as a student at a tertiary education institute when you turn up and physically enroll - This is also when SFE (or equivalent) is informed.

    Also, the academic year varies, for example, mine ended on the 17th June.
    the DWP won't accept that. If you've left education in June; you have to wait until September to apply. Why do you think universities are telling their graduates they have to wait until September to apply for JSA.

    Also can't apply for JSA if you aren't looking for work and are a student... It's called Jobseekers Allowance not Student/Education Support Allowance.

    Most importantly if for whatever reason you've managed to get an interview with an advisor to start your claim and they ask for your National Insurance number, it'll flag up on the system that you've applied for Student Finance which indicates university. HRMC has close links with DWP (Jobcentre) and SLC (Student Finance) so it'll be an automatic refusal.
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    (Original post by simplylldxo)
    the DWP won't accept that. If you've left education in June; you have to wait until September to apply. Why do you think universities are telling their graduates they have to wait until September to apply for JSA.

    Also can't apply for JSA if you aren't looking for work and are a student... It's called Jobseekers Allowance not Student/Education Support Allowance.

    Most importantly if for whatever reason you've managed to get an interview with an advisor to start your claim and they ask for your National Insurance number, it'll flag up on the system that you've applied for Student Finance which indicates university. HRMC has close links with DWP (Jobcentre) and SLC (Student Finance) so it'll be an automatic refusal.
    You make a good last point, that could be very true!

    As for the first point, if you bring in a letter of enrollment that states the course end date, then that isn't an issue.
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    (Original post by ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈)
    You make a good last point, that could be very true!

    As for the first point, if you bring in a letter of enrollment that states the course end date, then that isn't an issue.

    Name:  ImageUploadedByTapatalk1406329808.655668.jpg
Views: 168
Size:  97.8 KB I should have posted this in my first post, it's not possible for a student in full time education to claim JSA (this is from Gov.UK)

    OP could however apply for a HC2 certificate which can help with dental fees and other NHS treatments!
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    (Original post by simplylldxo)
    Name:  ImageUploadedByTapatalk1406329808.655668.jpg
Views: 168
Size:  97.8 KB I should have posted this in my first post, it's not possible for a student in full time education to claim JSA (this is from Gov.UK)

    OP could however apply for a HC2 certificate which can help with dental fees and other NHS treatments!
    I'm not sure what point you're making here. Not to get off topic, however if you have an enrollment letter/attendance letter/statement from the college, with an end date, then legally, the individual is no longer in full time education after that date is passed.

    I am not arguing the point about students in FT education not being able to get JSA, I know that to be the case.
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    I just had an appointment with an NHS dentist due to a severely sore tooth. Just phone up your local nhs dentists and ask to register as an NHS patient and for a check up appointment. I managed to get an appointment the next day after 10 min of calling around, luckily for me my problem wasn't a cavity problem just a general gum infection so got a quick clean and some antibiotics. You pay a base rate for nhs dentist £20 for a check up and any small things like a quick clean. Around £50 to have one or multiple teeth pulled or teeth drilled etc or anything of that nature.

    If you're a full time student you can apply to get an exemption but I didn't bother for £20.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Seriously? Would I actually be able for like a month until results day?
    Yes, you can.

    You are no longer a full time student, however you should make this clear to the job centre, you don't need to mention that you're going to university, say you're looking for a job. You can 'sign off' just before your university course starts; you will have found an alternative to getting a job, and considering the jobcentre aim to put you in a job or education I don't really think it's that unfair or morally wrong.

    Check with your parents to ensure this doesn't impact any benefits your parents or family are entitled to, also a second opinion from the Citizens Advice Bureau might be a good idea, instead of taking legal advice from an Internet forum (which this is not).

    You need to get your problem treated as soon as you possibly can - I had a similar problem and a bacterial infection developed, now I have fibromyalgia... Don't sleep on it, ask your parents to pay for it then you can claim compensation using the HC1 forms. It's frustrating knowing I had to pay £90 for two teeth to be removed, but when I finally get around to filling out the form I can claim it back.

    (Original post by simplylldxo)
    You can't go on benefits when you are a student... You have to wait until the current Academic year ends which is the August 31st but by then you should already be enrolled with the university you are going to.
    The OP is not a student. The academic year does not end in August, it ends in July or whenever your college decides that your academic year ends. There is no official date to when it ends.

    (Original post by simplylldxo)
    Name:  ImageUploadedByTapatalk1406329808.655668.jpg
Views: 168
Size:  97.8 KB I should have posted this in my first post, it's not possible for a student in full time education to claim JSA (this is from Gov.UK)

    OP could however apply for a HC2 certificate which can help with dental fees and other NHS treatments!
    You're right, it's not possible for a full time student, which the OP is technically not.
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    (Original post by ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈)
    I'm not sure what point you're making here. Not to get off topic, however if you have an enrollment letter/attendance letter/statement from the college, with an end date, then legally, the individual is no longer in full time education after that date is passed.

    I am not arguing the point about students in FT education not being able to get JSA, I know that to be the case.
    Unfortunately DWP don't work and see it like that. Even if you aren't returning to education in September; the DWP see you as a full-time student in education regardless if the course has finished. So you can't claim JSA between June, July and August. Also I've been on JSA for a year (September 2012-2013) so I am speaking from personal experience, I got told in June 2012 I would have to wait until September 2012 to put in a claim for JSA.

    So you could show them a letter from your place of study that has your end date on it and protest that you aren't in full education but that's their rules and regulations that they have to abide too.

    Plus we don't need anymore scroungers on the welfare system, we have plenty already.
 
 
 
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