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New to this site. Life is becoming hopeless. Graduated Last year no luck on a job Watch

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    Firstly, I am new to this site.

    I graduated last year with a 2:2 (yes i know i should of put more effort) in BA (HONS) Marketing. My attendance however was second to none but I have never been great with exams, I pretty much ****ed up my dissertation and I was so drained as it took me just over an hour to travel to and from uni. I did unpaid work as i know most grad schemes to build up my skills and for the reason that most employers want 2:1s. I finished that in last November. I went with my mother on to visit my sick gran who lives in Jamaica. I came back in January and from there on it has been utter hell.

    I have been applying for jobs after jobs after jobs and i have had no luck at all. I have come to the point i am now applying for basic positions such as supermarket roles, retail roles, even a job being a painter and i have had no luck what so ever . My savings are running out, I can barely sleep during nights, I have shared a tear because this job hunting is becoming emotionally draining. I feel like the only person in my course who is yet to find something. I feel so depressed and anxious, even sending an application, i get doubts that that I won't get a phone call.

    I am lost in what to do. It is like I am going through a cycle where i am starting again with this job hunting. I am currently volunteering in my field, which has commenced since May, but i need a part time or temporary role just so i can have a little income coming in.

    This year has been the worse year of my life. The only pain that come top this is either a close family member has died then after that my savings have completely finished. I feel so frustrated, depressed, emotionally tired from this. There are times when i just want to give up for good!

    I have been to the Doctors a couple of weeks back due to my health and they told me I have Anxiety but all they did was print out some sheets to give to me.

    Anyone else currently going through this or been through this situation. It be good to hear from you and maybe give me some advice.

    Life is so hard man!
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    I really feel for you, OP. I know how hard it is, I was there myself. The constant rejections really chip away at your confidence and breaks you down.

    You're doing all the right things is all I can say, and the volunteering will at least fill any gap in your CV and show some relevance to your career.

    Have you tried having your cv looked over? Are you getting interviews? How broad in terms of location is your search?

    It's really hard to stay upbeat and positive but you really do need to try and tap into that, as depression becomes an infection. I would try and arrange therapist sessions if possible, just to keep yourself in check.


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    (Original post by Ldn_footiek)
    Firstly, I am new to this site.

    I graduated last year with a 2:2 (yes i know i should of put more effort) in BA (HONS) Marketing. My attendance however was second to none but I have never been great with exams, I pretty much ****ed up my dissertation and I was so drained as it took me just over an hour to travel to and from uni. I did unpaid work as i know most grad schemes to build up my skills and for the reason that most employers want 2:1s. I finished that in last November. I went with my mother on to visit my sick gran who lives in Jamaica. I came back in January and from there on it has been utter hell.

    I have been applying for jobs after jobs after jobs and i have had no luck at all. I have come to the point i am now applying for basic positions such as supermarket roles, retail roles, even a job being a painter and i have had no luck what so ever . My savings are running out, I can barely sleep during nights, I have shared a tear because this job hunting is becoming emotionally draining. I feel like the only person in my course who is yet to find something. I feel so depressed and anxious, even sending an application, i get doubts that that I won't get a phone call.

    I am lost in what to do. It is like I am going through a cycle where i am starting again with this job hunting. I am currently volunteering in my field, which has commenced since May, but i need a part time or temporary role just so i can have a little income coming in.

    This year has been the worse year of my life. The only pain that come top this is either a close family member has died then after that my savings have completely finished. I feel so frustrated, depressed, emotionally tired from this. There are times when i just want to give up for good!

    I have been to the Doctors a couple of weeks back due to my health and they told me I have Anxiety but all they did was print out some sheets to give to me.

    Anyone else currently going through this or been through this situation. It be good to hear from you and maybe give me some advice.

    Life is so hard man!
    You are doing the right thing in volunteering..
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    (Original post by Pipsico)
    I really feel for you, OP. I know how hard it is, I was there myself. The constant rejections really chip away at your confidence and breaks you down.

    You're doing all the right things is all I can say, and the volunteering will at least fill any gap in your CV and show some relevance to your career.

    Have you tried having your cv looked over? Are you getting interviews? How broad in terms of location is your search?

    It's really hard to stay upbeat and positive but you really do need to try and tap into that, as depression becomes an infection. I would try and arrange therapist sessions if possible, just to keep yourself in check.


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    Hey man thanks for the reply.

    Yes i am doing voluntary work not just to get the skills but like you said so they isn't a gap on the CV.

    I have had my CV checked over by my university, A recruiter who deals specifically with the marketing recruitment and my Job Centre Adviser.

    I had like 5 Interviews over the last 7 months, and of course as you gathered by this forum, it has been unsuccessful. Two however was commissioned based jobs and I was not keen, as it is commission so no sales, no wage. This Anxiety and depression is affecting me, It has been a long time since I had a good laugh, It has affected me because without a steady income, I can't go out, cant go on any dates, can't save up for a deposit on a flat etc.

    I know i got a 2:2 but I believe that the skills that I have gained is suited to the jobs i have been applying for. I even tailor my CV, and even get my cover letter check out by the Recruiter who is in charge of the marketing aspect.

    I feel so lost, I really do feel hopeless right now.
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    (Original post by Ldn_footiek)
    Firstly, I am new to this site.

    I graduated last year with a 2:2 (yes i know i should of put more effort) in BA (HONS) Marketing. My attendance however was second to none but I have never been great with exams, I pretty much ****ed up my dissertation and I was so drained as it took me just over an hour to travel to and from uni. I did unpaid work as i know most grad schemes to build up my skills and for the reason that most employers want 2:1s. I finished that in last November. I went with my mother on to visit my sick gran who lives in Jamaica. I came back in January and from there on it has been utter hell.

    I have been applying for jobs after jobs after jobs and i have had no luck at all. I have come to the point i am now applying for basic positions such as supermarket roles, retail roles, even a job being a painter and i have had no luck what so ever . My savings are running out, I can barely sleep during nights, I have shared a tear because this job hunting is becoming emotionally draining. I feel like the only person in my course who is yet to find something. I feel so depressed and anxious, even sending an application, i get doubts that that I won't get a phone call.

    I am lost in what to do. It is like I am going through a cycle where i am starting again with this job hunting. I am currently volunteering in my field, which has commenced since May, but i need a part time or temporary role just so i can have a little income coming in.

    This year has been the worse year of my life. The only pain that come top this is either a close family member has died then after that my savings have completely finished. I feel so frustrated, depressed, emotionally tired from this. There are times when i just want to give up for good!

    I have been to the Doctors a couple of weeks back due to my health and they told me I have Anxiety but all they did was print out some sheets to give to me.

    Anyone else currently going through this or been through this situation. It be good to hear from you and maybe give me some advice.

    Life is so hard man!
    OP, treat your job seeking as a full time unpaid internship.
    Be professional about your job search and leave emotion out of it, just keep going and hopefully something will come through.
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    I need more information to give proper help... namely what jobs are you applying for?

    What worked for me was this:

    After my 2nd year of university I did not want to go back, so I applied for many many many full-time jobs to try and give me some work that I could do instead of university.. I got no where. Eventually I decided to go back to university, but with the specific aim to get a job, not to focus on doing the best I could do in my degree.. (very jelous of people where these are the same thing).

    I looked at the jobs that I wanted to do, and that I thought I could do well.. picked about 20-30 positions, and made a large list of all of the personal skills and experiances that they wanted. Ignoring all the overlaping ones, this made a pretty large list.

    I then set out to simply make sure I could match or exceed every one of these requirements..

    I was lucky, I had a year of univesrity to do this - but its the advice I would give to people now, as ive seen it work for more people then myself..

    Job hunting was pretty simple by the time I finished university - I was ticking off every single box these jobs wanted, with a set of skills dirrectly relating to what they required.

    -- So that would be my advice.. what jobs are you applying for? When reading their job list, can you match and exceed every one of their criteria WITH real-world exsamples not just university modules/work.

    If you can do that, then I cannot believe its anything but a matter of time until you get a job in the type you like.

    - My other advice would be to be incredibly pro-active.. a few of my friends are currently working in companies that they just went up and approached.. my best friend knew the area he wanted to work in, and he just phoned up, offered to work for a week or so for free for experiance.. the first one who agreed.. he went along, worked hard, at the end of the week - walked in to his boss, and said give me a job.. and they did.
    So dont underestimate the market for jobs that are not advertised.. companies may be willing to take on a good young individual, even if they do not have such a need for it that they would be seeking/advertising. A lot of jobs come about without any advertisment..
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    (Original post by Kasa)
    You are doing the right thing in volunteering..
    Yes i know, but I need something more concrete so i can get a steady income coming in. I am not asking for a £20k+ job, although that is where I would like to be in 2-3 years time. Even if it is a £7 a hour shift, I would be more than happy to take it.
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    (Original post by fallen_acorns)
    I need more information to give proper help... namely what jobs are you applying for?
    I have applied for Marketing, Admin, Retail, Sales, Supermarket jobs I.E working in Tesco and jobs such as being a painter.

    What worked for me was this:

    (Original post by fallen_acorns)
    After my 2nd year of university I did not want to go back, so I applied for many many many full-time jobs to try and give me some work that I could do instead of university.. I got no where. Eventually I decided to go back to university, but with the specific aim to get a job, not to focus on doing the best I could do in my degree.. (very jelous of people where these are the same thing).
    Ok I see

    I looked at the jobs that I wanted to do, and that I thought I could do well.. picked about 20-30 positions, and made a large list of all of the personal skills and experiances that they wanted. Ignoring all the overlaping ones, this made a pretty large list.

    I then set out to simply make sure I could match or exceed every one of these requirements..

    I was lucky, I had a year of univesrity to do this - but its the advice I would give to people now, as ive seen it work for more people then myself..

    (Original post by fallen_acorns)
    Job hunting was pretty simple by the time I finished university - I was ticking off every single box these jobs wanted, with a set of skills dirrectly relating to what they required.
    But i do this too. I look for exactly what the employer wants and tailor my cv and cover letter to their specification.

    -- So that would be my advice.. what jobs are you applying for? When reading their job list, can you match and exceed every one of their criteria WITH real-world exsamples not just university modules/work.

    If you can do that, then I cannot believe its anything but a matter of time until you get a job in the type you like.

    (Original post by fallen_acorns)
    My other advice would be to be incredibly pro-active.. a few of my friends are currently working in companies that they just went up and approached.. my best friend knew the area he wanted to work in, and he just phoned up, offered to work for a week or so for free for experiance.. the first one who agreed.. he went along, worked hard, at the end of the week - walked in to his boss, and said give me a job.. and they did.
    So dont underestimate the market for jobs that are not advertised.. companies may be willing to take on a good young individual, even if they do not have such a need for it that they would be seeking/advertising. A lot of jobs come about without any advertisment..
    So they literally just went into the building and actually got seen to the Hiring Manager of these particular companies? When I went to a recruiting consultant, I asked him about the hidden job market, for some reason he didn't believe all that stuff that most jobs are not advertised etc...
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    (Original post by Ldn_footiek)
    I have applied for Marketing, Admin, Retail, Sales, Supermarket jobs I.E working in Tesco and jobs such as being a painter.


    So they literally just went into the building and actually got seen to the Hiring Manager of these particular companies? When I went to a recruiting consultant, I asked him about the hidden job market, for some reason he didn't believe all that stuff that most jobs are not advertised etc...
    for the first part:

    Thats a wide selection of jobs.. when you look at the job adverts, and they have their 'person specification' do you match/exceed all they are looking for, with evidenced exsamples?

    And I dont just mean, do you think you have the skills.. but do you have real-world evidence for each.. so for instance, if I was applying for a job that needed skills with dancing (just an exsample) I may be the best dancer in the world, but its irrelivent if I cannot prove it.. So having real world proof, and being able to say 'I have done X, Y, Z, positions in dance productions, have volenteered for X company, and studied Y' etc, to back up the skill..

    So my question is, for the jobs you are applying for, can you do this for all the skills they are looking for? (especially the essential skill list, as most jobs give skills priority orders in person specifications)

    ---


    ***Disclaimer*** This next part is just whats worked for me, and not sound job-seeking advice from a professional.. it could be wrong.. but it just worked very very well for me***
    What Ive seen then work very very well, is to use this all in a very matter-of-fact cover letter.. A few of my peers including myself, took the aproach of not using a fluently written cover letter, and instead just bullet-pointing the dirrect skills that match the job discription. It seems to work quite well in some sectors, as you can very very clearly get across the message of 'Yes, I can do the job' - so if they had A,B,C,D,E of essential job skills.. I used to write a cover letter that had a very short paragraph explaining myself, and then a bullet pointed list with each of the skills they wanted, and underneath atleast 3-4 peices of experiance/evidence of my competancy in this..

    So it would look like:

    *Paragraph explaining myself, and the cover letter*

    Skill 1
    - Evidence 1
    - Evidence 2
    - Evidence 3
    - Evidence 4
    Skill 2
    - Evidence 1
    Etc. Etc.

    It worked like a charm, and in interviews I had very positive reactions from it.. about how to-the-point it was, and how nice it was to not have to read through paragraphs of emotion/text, and just being able to get right to the point of Does this person have the skills to do this job

    ---

    For your final bit, it depends on the company, the companies my friends now work for are not huge, and they could with little hassle talk dirrectly to managers/their potential bosses.. I guess for them it was a case of picking the companies they felt could give them sucess.. choosing ones that were personal, smaller, easily aproachable etc. - and avoiding large coperations that they would hit a dead-end with
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    (Original post by fallen_acorns)
    for the first part:

    Thats a wide selection of jobs.. when you look at the job adverts, and they have their 'person specification' do you match/exceed all they are looking for, with evidenced exsamples?
    Yes i do, even there are some jobs that I had applied for which only needed the candidate to process three skills, for example, "Excellent Communication skills" "Highly Organised" & "Proficient In Microsoft Office Packages" for example.

    And I dont just mean, do you think you have the skills.. but do you have real-world evidence for each.. so for instance, if I was applying for a job that needed skills with dancing (just an exsample) I may be the best dancer in the world, but its irrelivent if I cannot prove it.. So having real world proof, and being able to say 'I have done X, Y, Z, positions in dance productions, have volenteered for X company, and studied Y' etc, to back up the skill..

    So my question is, for the jobs you are applying for, can you do this for all the skills they are looking for? (especially the essential skill list, as most jobs give skills priority orders in person specifications)

    ---


    ***Disclaimer*** This next part is just whats worked for me, and not sound job-seeking advice from a professional.. it could be wrong.. but it just worked very very well for me***
    What Ive seen then work very very well, is to use this all in a very matter-of-fact cover letter.. A few of my peers including myself, took the aproach of not using a fluently written cover letter, and instead just bullet-pointing the dirrect skills that match the job discription. It seems to work quite well in some sectors, as you can very very clearly get across the message of 'Yes, I can do the job' - so if they had A,B,C,D,E of essential job skills.. I used to write a cover letter that had a very short paragraph explaining myself, and then a bullet pointed list with each of the skills they wanted, and underneath atleast 3-4 peices of experiance/evidence of my competancy in this..

    So it would look like:

    *Paragraph explaining myself, and the cover letter*

    Skill 1
    - Evidence 1
    - Evidence 2
    - Evidence 3
    - Evidence 4
    Skill 2
    - Evidence 1
    Etc. Etc.

    It worked like a charm, and in interviews I had very positive reactions from it.. about how to-the-point it was, and how nice it was to not have to read through paragraphs of emotion/text, and just being able to get right to the point of Does this person have the skills to do this job

    ---

    (Original post by fallen_acorns)
    For your final bit, it depends on the company, the companies my friends now work for are not huge, and they could with little hassle talk dirrectly to managers/their potential bosses.. I guess for them it was a case of picking the companies they felt could give them sucess.. choosing ones that were personal, smaller, easily aproachable etc. - and avoiding large coperations that they would hit a dead-end with
    Ok I see
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    I've been there man, it's tough. It only worked out for me 3 weeks ago when I was offered my first job since I finished University in September. Get on JSA, set up email job alerts and you are doing the right thing in volunteering, it got me to the interview stage for a number of companies.
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    (Original post by randomgeeza)
    I've been there man, it's tough. It only worked out for me 3 weeks ago when I was offered my first job since I finished University in September. Get on JSA, set up email job alerts and you are doing the right thing in volunteering, it got me to the interview stage for a number of companies.
    Congrats on the job offer bro..

    Yes it is tough. Hard time for me at the moment.
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    (Original post by Ldn_footiek)
    Congrats on the job offer bro..

    Yes it is tough. Hard time for me at the moment.
    I know a friend doing marketing, he's focused on coding for websites and another friend who does graphic design (creates logos and website template designs). If you have any skills like coding/proficiency in any software. Make sure you look at the specific job and tailor your application for that. I work in HR, so I have access in to what makes an application good for the panel who interview and shortlist.
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    (Original post by randomgeeza)
    I know a friend doing marketing, he's focused on coding for websites and another friend who does graphic design (creates logos and website template designs). If you have any skills like coding/proficiency in any software. Make sure you look at the specific job and tailor your application for that. I work in HR, so I have access in to what makes an application good for the panel who interview and shortlist.
    Ok thanks for the advise.
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    Welcome to post graduate plus student debt life in 2014. Good luck.
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    Hey pal, I hope you're feeling better.

    I know this thread is a little old but I'll try to give my two cents.

    You've got a 2.2 - which doesn't mean the end of the world. It just means you need to be a little different in your approach.


    1) Focus on smaller companies. Graduate schemes and a many of the larger companies out there only ask for 2.1's - they are also insanely competitive. Even having a 2.1. doesn't guarantee you'll be successful with them. Instead i would focus on smaller companies i.e. SME's (Small and Medium Enterprises). SME's make up 98% of all companies in the UK and they employ 60% of the British workforce. They are also more likely to overlook grades, as smaller companies tend to focus on transferable skills.

    2) Go Direct: from what I gather, you are applying for jobs online and via recruiters. This is the most crowded channel as everyone and their grandma applies this way. Instead apply directly to the companies you're interested in. Going direct has a success rate of 60% as opposed to applying via job sites (14%).

    3) Call them: When i say direct - I mean call them. Do some research, draw up a list of around 50 companies that you are interested in and call them directly. Speak to a relevant manager and ask them if they are hiring graduates/entry level trainees. Although this sounds daunting, i promise you they won't bite - most employers are impressed by anyone who has the guts to call them directly.

    Calling them directly also has the desired effect of drawing attention away from your 2.2. - because you have already differentiated yourself from the crowd by having the guts to call directly. It shows initiative and that you can think outside the box - which is something most employers look for.


    Let me know how it goes, but best of luck with everything.
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    (Original post by nicky_vfliet)
    Hey pal, I hope you're feeling better.

    I know this thread is a little old but I'll try to give my two cents.

    You've got a 2.2 - which doesn't mean the end of the world. It just means you need to be a little different in your approach.


    1) Focus on smaller companies. Graduate schemes and a many of the larger companies out there only ask for 2.1's - they are also insanely competitive. Even having a 2.1. doesn't guarantee you'll be successful with them. Instead i would focus on smaller companies i.e. SME's (Small and Medium Enterprises). SME's make up 98% of all companies in the UK and they employ 60% of the British workforce. They are also more likely to overlook grades, as smaller companies tend to focus on transferable skills.

    2) Go Direct: from what I gather, you are applying for jobs online and via recruiters. This is the most crowded channel as everyone and their grandma applies this way. Instead apply directly to the companies you're interested in. Going direct has a success rate of 60% as opposed to applying via job sites (14%).

    3) Call them: When i say direct - I mean call them. Do some research, draw up a list of around 50 companies that you are interested in and call them directly. Speak to a relevant manager and ask them if they are hiring graduates/entry level trainees. Although this sounds daunting, i promise you they won't bite - most employers are impressed by anyone who has the guts to call them directly.

    Calling them directly also has the desired effect of drawing attention away from your 2.2. - because you have already differentiated yourself from the crowd by having the guts to call directly. It shows initiative and that you can think outside the box - which is something most employers look for.


    Let me know how it goes, but best of luck with everything.
    Hey mate,

    Thanks for the advice. Probably the best way forward. I know it is extremely crowded but at times i feel it like the only way. I don't know 50 SME companies from the top of my head. The companies I would like to work for, i have already did this technique and they stated that they is no Work experience/Internships or graduate schemes/training happening at the moment.

    Thanks for your help
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    (Original post by Ldn_footiek)
    Hey mate,

    Thanks for the advice. Probably the best way forward. I know it is extremely crowded but at times i feel it like the only way. I don't know 50 SME companies from the top of my head. The companies I would like to work for, i have already did this technique and they stated that they is no Work experience/Internships or graduate schemes/training happening at the moment.

    Thanks for your help

    It sounds like you might need to research your field. You can do this in several ways:

    1) Get company names from industry journals/magazines - you can find these really easily by going to Google and typing in

    'Marketing' (or any other field of interest) + industry magazine:

    that will give you a list of several industry magazines: check them out and write down all the names of the companies, look at articles and look adverts within the magazine. For marketing I found: www.marketingweek.co.uk


    2) Look at Awards or 'Best Of' Lists - any industry will have some kind awards ceremony and a list of companies that won or were nominated - this is another to find companies in your space.

    3) Use Linkedin (www.linkedin.com): if you haven't already signed up, please do its a great tool and more importantly a fantastic database of relevant companies.


    At this point just gather names,don't worry too much about whether a certain company is a SME or not, you can elimate the non-SME's when you have enough names.

    Although it takes a bit of time, its worth the extra effort.

    Good luck.
 
 
 
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