Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    They like the idea of PhD + research training these days, i.e. US style.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Why durham? <frown> in a nice manner.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sashh)
    You'll have to do a BA before an MA. MA is higher because it is a second degree. BA is the normal degree (or BSc for sciences).
    You can do certain 3 to 4 year courses that skip the Bachelors and go straight to the Masters. ie MChem and MSci.

    At Oxbridge and MA means that you paid them £15 to upgrade your BA
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hornblower)
    No, you are not allowed to name the institute unless you're a graduate of the Oxbridge or Durham. There are no exceptions. Not following this is wrong and is frowned upon.

    You must either write Dr or PhD, not both. The BSc is superfluous if the MSc is written.
    also, with LSE and all the other london places awarded by the university of London. so you would have a degree from london rather than LSE or have to write Mr John Smith (LSE, London) or summat

    also whats the difference between MPhil, PhD, MRes and DPHil?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shiny)
    The research councils have changed the funding formulas for PhDs now and generally prefer people to have done a Masters and before a PhD.
    Only the Arts based councils.

    For science with a 2i you can go stright to PhD/DPhil. with a 2.2 it is usualy to do a Masters and then apply.

    For scientists out there, I suggest you read the Roberts Report on [post grads in Science and Engineering. He suggested a 4 year PhD (ie you still get funded if you're writing up - bonus!) and the MRC, Wellcome trust and BBSRC are taking up the suggestion...
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by notyourpunk)
    also, with LSE and all the other london places awarded by the university of London. so you would have a degree from london rather than LSE or have to write Mr John Smith (LSE, London) or summat

    also whats the difference between MPhil, PhD, MRes and DPHil?
    PhD and DPhil are both doctoral quals

    MRes - masters by research.
    MPhil - also a masters qual like D phil, but the M stands for master not doctor.

    Different places award different degrees, but at the end of the day they mean the same thing.

    KCL, UCL, QMUL etc are just colleges. The degree awarding body is hte University of London.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by d750)
    I think they do pretty much insist on a master's course. Their PhD funding form says explicitly that there is very little chance of getting funding if you haven't completed a master's degree.
    Not the case for Science - None of my friends in my year had done a masters, and I only know of one person who did - to bring a 2.2 up to standard to allow him to do a DPhil.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fluffy)
    You can do certain 3 to 4 year courses that skip the Bachelors and go straight to the Masters. ie MChem and MSci.

    At Oxbridge and MA means that you paid them £15 to upgrade your BA
    Only £15? What a bargain
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    [QUOTE=Pencil Queen]Who's funding form?

    Sorry, should have said it was the AHRB. I think it's generally acknowledged that funding is very difficult / impossible to secure for a PhD in the humanities without a master's degree.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    [QUOTE=d750]
    (Original post by Pencil Queen)
    Who's funding form?

    Sorry, should have said it was the AHRB. I think it's generally acknowledged that funding is very difficult / impossible to secure for a PhD in the humanities without a master's degree.
    It is possible though... My other half (didn't/doesn't have a masters) was offered and AHRB grant to study for a law based PhD in Nottingham. He was offered Oxford shortly afterwards, but the AHRB refused to re-allocate the funding to Oxford so he had to self fund. Apparently the AHRB will only fund x number of people per uni, so beware when applying to the AHRB. Their resources are soo stretched they are very careful to make sure money is distributed equally amongst universities rather than going to the most deserving candidate. Also if someone at a Uni who has AHRB money doesn't submit on time, the uni is usally blacklisted and won't receive money for the next few years... No matter how good a proposal you put in!
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Basically postgrad funding in the UK is a pile of poo. Fortunately I am in one of those boom sectors which politicians love and getting funding is pretty easy. Some of my friends are having to balance a full-time PhD with part-time jobs which is kind of sad.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by claire1985)
    My boyfriend does Msci as his first degree, at Imperial.
    Yeah, they seem quite common for science subjects, but I've never seen an MA as an undergraduate arts degree (except in scotland)
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hornblower)
    The ancient Scottish universities generally give the MA for an undergraduate arts degree.

    The way to write your degree title is generally:

    Mr John Smith BA (Hons)

    Only Oxbridge and Durham graduates are entitled to give the institution after their name. The classification is not listed.

    I KNow i dont post here often, but god almighty, hornblower, you dont half post some crap. what is that rubbish i have quoted? only oxford and durham graduates can state their institute? My Ass!!!! Everyone does!!! gO TO uni websites and check out department profiles, even when you walk down the street you can see a dentist which states where the tooth-meister graduated, you are full of absolute rubbish. i have read so many threads by u, and they are sooo full of cack. please. stop it. graduates can name their institution. infact, it is almost prerequisite for lecturers to do so on uni websites, bristol, hull, exeter, cambridge, the list goes on.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Pencil Queen)
    Well in engineering an UG masters is pretty much standard anyway.
    Seriously?! Great .
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Pencil Queen)
    You're studying a BSc in Physics?

    In engineering there has for a very very long time been a preference for employers/academics to choose people with MEng's over those with BEngs (which is why most universities recommend that you apply for the MEng if it's likely you'll get the grades and even if you don't get the grades for direct entry onto the MEng course they will encourage you to do your best to get onto the 4 year course once you've arrived) It's particularly important if you're looking to apply for Chartered engineer (CEng) status (although not as important as studying an accredited degree) as a BEng can mean many more years of work experience to get your CEng.
    I am, but I might change to Electrical and Electronic Engineering and might not be able to do the 4 year course cos of cost. Thanks.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fluffy)
    It is possible though... My other half (didn't/doesn't have a masters) was offered and AHRB grant to study for a law based PhD in Nottingham. He was offered Oxford shortly afterwards, but the AHRB refused to re-allocate the funding to Oxford so he had to self fund. Apparently the AHRB will only fund x number of people per uni, so beware when applying to the AHRB. Their resources are soo stretched they are very careful to make sure money is distributed equally amongst universities rather than going to the most deserving candidate. Also if someone at a Uni who has AHRB money doesn't submit on time, the uni is usally blacklisted and won't receive money for the next few years... No matter how good a proposal you put in!
    Basically, it was possible up until this year. As the AHRB has slightly changed the structure of their applications from this year it is now virtually impossible to get funding for a PhD without having done a Masters (maybe if the PhD is more like a structured doctoral programme with proper training in the first one or two years.)
    I was going to apply to do a PhD straight away (expecting to get a solid First) and several lecturers encouraged me to do so until they were told (by people who knew more about this) that from 2004 I would be very very very unlikely to get funding without a Masters, even with a brilliant First on my BA. There's still the possibility to upgrade though: start out ona research masters with a formal training component and then, if you're getting on well, convert this into the first year of a PhD retrospectively.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fluffy)
    You can do certain 3 to 4 year courses that skip the Bachelors and go straight to the Masters. ie MChem and MSci.

    At Oxbridge and MA means that you paid them £15 to upgrade your BA
    Ok, I was generalising. There are exceptions I know.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Pencil Queen)
    http://www.iee.org/ProfessionalRegistration/Education/

    Might be worth looking at - a BEng wont rule you out (and it's certainly better than a non-accredited course) but it might be worth finding the extra money for the extra year would work out cheaper in the long run - also many of these people run bursary/grant schemes that might help you with the money costs

    http://www.iee.org/EduCareers/Awards/UG/
    Ah, both useful. Thanks PQ.
 
 
 
Poll
Who is most responsible for your success at university
Useful resources
Uni match

Applying to uni?

Our tool will help you find the perfect course

Articles:

Debate and current affairs guidelinesDebate and current affairs wiki

Quick link:

Educational debate unanswered threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.