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Transferring unis after foundation year... Watch

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    Hi,

    I have been accepted onto Mathematics with a foundation year as a mature student at University of Kent. I applied to a few others for Actuarial Science (Southampton, City) but got rejected.

    I am determined to transfer to a better ranked university like UCL or Bath next year as I have lived in Canterbury nearly all my life and am pretty much sick of the city. I have emailed the Unis I would like to transfer to and they said that I have to retake A Levels. This is why I am planning to retake my A Levels next year as well as the do the foundation course and apply through UCAS again next cycle.

    I understand the workload would be immense but I really don't want to stay at Kent and if I were to pay £9k for tuition fees wherever I'm at then I may as well get the best tuition there is.

    Do you think this would be possible? Anyone who has transferred successfully please post your thoughts and any advice you have would be much appreciated. Thanks!

    A Levels: Maths (A) Further Maths (D) Economics (C) in 2005
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    Hi,

    I'm in a similar sort of position as you. I'm also starting a foundation year (results permitting) leading to allied health professions and plan to apply else where at the next cycle, as I have to apply to even stay at the same uni, so I may as well use all 5 choices. The uni's I'm planning to apply to aren't at the calibre of yours (as they don't do my course anyway) so luckily, the one's I've spoken to will accept my foundation year. Have you emailed them a copy of all of the modules you'll be studying? That may make them realise that you're covering A-level and higher subjects!

    If you've already emailed the universities you really want to attend, and they definitely wont accept your foundation year, why don't you drop going this year and work on your A-levels instead? It kinda kills two birds with one stone. Although, you'll leave yourself open to not getting in anywhere if you're a-levels don't turn out how you want. Perhaps you could look into 'lesser' universities that will accept the FY? You're in a difficult position so there's nothing to be ashamed of if you don't get into the 'best' uni - it's hard for people who are traditionally applying.

    Best of luck.
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    (Original post by _jake_)
    Hi,

    I'm in a similar sort of position as you. I'm also starting a foundation year (results permitting) leading to allied health professions and plan to apply else where at the next cycle, as I have to apply to even stay at the same uni, so I may as well use all 5 choices. The uni's I'm planning to apply to aren't at the calibre of yours (as they don't do my course anyway) so luckily, the one's I've spoken to will accept my foundation year. Have you emailed them a copy of all of the modules you'll be studying? That may make them realise that you're covering A-level and higher subjects!

    If you've already emailed the universities you really want to attend, and they definitely wont accept your foundation year, why don't you drop going this year and work on your A-levels instead? It kinda kills two birds with one stone. Although, you'll leave yourself open to not getting in anywhere if you're a-levels don't turn out how you want. Perhaps you could look into 'lesser' universities that will accept the FY? You're in a difficult position so there's nothing to be ashamed of if you don't get into the 'best' uni - it's hard for people who are traditionally applying.

    Best of luck.
    Yes I actually emailed about 5 unis to see if they would take the fy and a link to the modules. All but Bath said that the materials were not sufficient for their course and they suggested that I retake the A Levels. I have considered it but my local colleges won't "allow" me to retake them as I have taken them before! I was planning on studying for the retakes myself and taking the exams at a private centre as well as doing the foundation year but I think all this is going to be too much especially as I don't know whether there will be clashes in the exam timetable!

    My priority is getting out of Kent so I think the "lesser unis" option is one to take. Thanks for your post!
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    Oh well, it's their loss! Yeah colleges can be a bit picky. Normally, funding wise, you cannot retake if you've already achieved an level 3 qualification. You could possibly still do them, I've a friend who did but they had to fund them privately, which was something like £2000 p/a!! I definitely think that would be too much work for one person, as you say, I'd just stick at the foundation year and during the time contact universities and see who would accept you and pick the one furthest from Kent!! ha ha.

    Don't worry too much about uni league tables, if you're studying Maths it shows you're very capable, even if it's not at UCL and you shouldn't have much trouble gaining a job. Remember there's more to it than just your degree and where you've studied, your work experience is just as important, as well as your personality.

    Hope everything works out for you,

    Jake
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    You want to do your A-Levels and your Foundation course at the same time? I don't see why you'd need to do both. At the moment it seems the Universities you are interested in prefer A-Levels.

    With the amount of free resources available online nowadays you could easily self-teach A-Level Mathematics, Further Mathematics and Economics within a year. The only thing you'll have to pay for is perhaps a few books and the exam costs. I personally paid £50 per exam earlier this year and I am in Kent as well but I am hoping to find a school or college that is cheaper.

    I say 'Easily' since you were prepared to do both at the same time. Good luck with everything.
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    The reason why I want to actually go to Uni this year is because I am sick of doing nothing and being jobless. Plus I like the idea of making more friends who have similar interests e.g. maths etc and turns out I didn't get my first choice in course but I would rather go this year than be out of a routine and become de-motivated to study sometimes getting nowhere. Also I'll have tutors as UCAS references which would look better on my application.
    are you taking STEP?

    Which school did you take them with? King's School Canterbury takes private candidates and for £20 per unit! Which Universities are you applying to?

    I do feel that if I am already attending maths classes my mind will be in "maths mode" and I would find it easier to do them again. I have just found out that most of the foundation year is based on the Further Maths syllabus anyway so I'll just be revising that.
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    (Original post by devon87)
    The reason why I want to actually go to Uni this year is because I am sick of doing nothing and being jobless. Plus I like the idea of making more friends who have similar interests e.g. maths etc and turns out I didn't get my first choice in course but I would rather go this year than be out of a routine and become de-motivated to study sometimes getting nowhere. Also I'll have tutors as UCAS references which would look better on my application.
    are you taking STEP?

    Which school did you take them with? King's School Canterbury takes private candidates and for £20 per unit! Which Universities are you applying to?

    I do feel that if I am already attending maths classes my mind will be in "maths mode" and I would find it easier to do them again. I have just found out that most of the foundation year is based on the Further Maths syllabus anyway so I'll just be revising that.
    You should have quoted me, I would have replied earlier

    I actually understand how you feel about going to University. I was denied the chance to go to University in 2012 when I was 18 and it made me very sad. I am 20 now and if all goes well this year I should be starting a Mathematics degree at a reputable University in 2015.

    I am completely self-taught for Mathematics so I have no references to vouch for my ability, thus I am going to find a private tutor, demonstrate my ability and ask for a reference. Of course I will go for further lessons with them as I am also doing Additional Further Mathematics as well as STEP 2 and 3.

    Wow, that is cheap! It is pretty close by car too :| I will ask if the hold the STEP exams and if so I will do my exams with them, thank you!

    Since you say most of what you have learned is based on the Further Maths syllabus then you'll blaze through A-Level Maths, giving you plenty of time for Economics and Further Maths.

    Lastly, here is how I self-study:

    Mathematics

    I watch tutorials from ExamSolutions, Khan Academy, M4ths.com and then complete exercises from the EdExcel books as well as MyMaths from time to time. I shall be signing up to LiveMaths as they have content the websites I mentioned do not have.

    Economics

    I actually have a thread for AS Economics if you'd like to take a look. I am not too sure about what A2 will be like so I cannot comment on how long it will take to learn.

    To conclude this post I think you should apply for entry in 2015. You should be able to if you have good predicted grades from your tutors as well as a great personal statement. I wish you the best of luck
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    (Original post by L'Etudiant)
    You should have quoted me, I would have replied earlier

    I actually understand how you feel about going to University. I was denied the chance to go to University in 2012 when I was 18 and it made me very sad. I am 20 now and if all goes well this year I should be starting a Mathematics degree at a reputable University in 2015.

    I am completely self-taught for Mathematics so I have no references to vouch for my ability, thus I am going to find a private tutor, demonstrate my ability and ask for a reference. Of course I will go for further lessons with them as I am also doing Additional Further Mathematics as well as STEP 2 and 3.

    Wow, that is cheap! It is pretty close by car too :| I will ask if the hold the STEP exams and if so I will do my exams with them, thank you!

    Since you say most of what you have learned is based on the Further Maths syllabus then you'll blaze through A-Level Maths, giving you plenty of time for Economics and Further Maths.

    Lastly, here is how I self-study:

    Mathematics

    I watch tutorials from ExamSolutions, Khan Academy, M4ths.com and then complete exercises from the EdExcel books as well as MyMaths from time to time. I shall be signing up to LiveMaths as they have content the websites I mentioned do not have.

    Economics

    I actually have a thread for AS Economics if you'd like to take a look. I am not too sure about what A2 will be like so I cannot comment on how long it will take to learn.

    To conclude this post I think you should apply for entry in 2015. You should be able to if you have good predicted grades from your tutors as well as a great personal statement. I wish you the best of luck
    I watch ExamSolutions too, paid for MathsNet and FMSP.

    STEP 1, 2 and 3 is also available from King's at £46 per paper and £25 administration fee. I will be taking those too next year so might see you at registration!

    Best of luck with your studies too!
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    (Original post by devon87)
    I watch ExamSolutions too, paid for MathsNet and FMSP.

    STEP 1, 2 and 3 is also available from King's at £46 per paper and £25 administration fee. I will be taking those too next year so might see you at registration!

    Best of luck with your studies too!
    Wow, if only I found out about King's earlier, that is so cheap! :| You'll see me for sure, will call them for exams in September! Will you also be doing STEP 1? I don't think you need to if you're doing 2 and 3.

    Thanks and good luck to you too!
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    (Original post by L'Etudiant)
    Wow, if only I found out about King's earlier, that is so cheap! :| You'll see me for sure, will call them for exams in September! Will you also be doing STEP 1? I don't think you need to if you're doing 2 and 3.

    Thanks and good luck to you too!
    I might do (1 and 3) or (2 and 3). Haven't really decided yet and don't really know the difference between 1 and 2. Except for they're both based on A Level syllabus but is one harder than the other?

    I am also taking MAT in November because I am applying for Imperial.

    Happy revising!
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    (Original post by devon87)
    I might do (1 and 3) or (2 and 3). Haven't really decided yet and don't really know the difference between 1 and 2. Except for they're both based on A Level syllabus but is one harder than the other?

    I am also taking MAT in November because I am applying for Imperial.

    Happy revising!
    I am not so sure but I know that 2 and 3 are harder than 1. So if you do the latter two you won't need to do 1. Woah, MAT and STEP! Happy revising indeed! :O
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    (Original post by devon87)
    Hi, I am determined to transfer to a better ranked university like UCL or Bath next year as I have lived in Canterbury nearly all my life and am pretty much sick of the city. I have emailed the Unis I would like to transfer to and they said that I have to retake A Levels. This is why I am planning to retake my A Levels next year as well as the do the foundation course and apply through UCAS again next cycle.
    there are two *******s in your situation.
    1) lets say you're studying in Kent College for the foundation. naturally you would proceed onto Kent University for the degree. But if the college knows that you have decided to go to another university, instead of Kent University, your college may not award you high marks for your foundation programme.

    if you don't have high marks in your foundation subjects, it is very difficult to progress to another university for the degree course. this is because the other universities demand extremely higher grades in order for you to enter into their degree courses. the issue becomes bigger if the actual university you want to go to (UCL), is much higher ranked than the university you're supposed to have gone to (Kent).

    foundation colleges are money making mechanisms. the sooner people realize it the better.

    2) handling the foundation course with having to do A-levels can be quite tough. but if you're mentally tough then go for it.
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    (Original post by Maura Kat)
    there are two *******s in your situation.
    1) lets say you're studying in Kent College for the foundation. naturally you would proceed onto Kent University for the degree. But if the college knows that you have decided to go to another university, instead of Kent University, your college may not award you high marks for your foundation programme.

    if you don't have high marks in your foundation subjects, it is very difficult to progress to another university for the degree course. this is because the other universities demand extremely higher grades in order for you to enter into their degree courses. the issue becomes bigger if the actual university you want to go to (UCL), is much higher ranked than the university you're supposed to have gone to (Kent).

    foundation colleges are money making mechanisms. the sooner people realize it the better.

    2) handling the foundation course with having to do A-levels can be quite tough. but if you're mentally tough then go for it.
    First of all, it is the University that is offering the foundation year, not a foundation college but that might not matter in this context as they are both making money somehow. I doubt that with a subject like maths where there is a right or wrong answer, that the examiners would mark it incorrect when it is actually correct to please the staff I so offended by not being loyal to the University. Or am I being ridiculously naive and the so called college revels in such corrupt behaviour?

    For some people it may be the only option of whether to be part of a network and have that support with your studies for a year (foundation) because you had reasons for not doing so well the first time round than to drop out completely because you couldn't get a place in anything else and it is the first scenario that applies to my situation.

    Retaking and doing foundation seems to be my best bet if I am going to transfer successfully.
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    (Original post by devon87)
    I doubt that with a subject like maths where there is a right or wrong answer, that the examiners would mark it incorrect when it is actually correct to please the staff I so offended by not being loyal to the University. Or am I being ridiculously naive and the so called college revels in such corrupt behaviour?

    Retaking and doing foundation seems to be my best bet if I am going to transfer successfully.
    It has nothing to do with corruption or falsely marking scripts.
    You will have to score at least 70-75% in your modules in order to crossover to a higher ranked uni.
    this is the way it is and this is the way it will continue to be.

    this applies to business and law.
    several international students have successfully crossed over to higher ranked universities from lower ranked university colleges.
    for example, students from Warwick International College crossed over to Nottingham Uni.
    these students scored at least 70-75% in their foundation modules.

    anyways, since the universities, as you've said, said that you'll have to retake your A levels then.
    i guess you know what to do next.
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    "But if the college knows that you have decided to go to another university, instead of Kent University, your college may not award you high marks for your foundation programme."

    You can't just contradict yourself like that
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      (Original post by Maura Kat)
      there are two *******s in your situation.
      1) lets say you're studying in Kent College for the foundation. naturally you would proceed onto Kent University for the degree. But if the college knows that you have decided to go to another university, instead of Kent University, your college may not award you high marks for your foundation programme.

      [snip]
      (Original post by Maura Kat)
      It has nothing to do with corruption or falsely marking scripts.
      You will have to score at least 70-75% in your modules in order to crossover to a higher ranked uni.
      this is the way it is and this is the way it will continue to be.
      So if the college is deliberately marking students down to "penalise" them for not staying on for university, how does that not constitute corruption or falsely marking scripts?

      With the greatest respect, you're not qualified to be passing judgement like this. You're not an admissions tutor or an examiner, and from your post history I believe you're still in the process of applying to university.

      One of the most important traits a lawyer can have is not being afraid to say "I don't know and this is outside of my expertise". I'd suggest that you consider whether the content of your post is something about which you're truly knowledgeable before posting something that has the potential to scaremonger.
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      (Original post by Blackacre)
      So if the college is deliberately marking students down to "penalise" them for not staying on for university, how does that not constitute corruption or falsely marking scripts?

      With the greatest respect, you're not qualified to be passing judgement like this. You're not an admissions tutor or an examiner, and from your post history I believe you're still in the process of applying to university.

      One of the most important traits a lawyer can have is not being afraid to say "I don't know and this is outside of my expertise". I'd suggest that you consider whether the content of your post is something about which you're truly knowledgeable before posting something that has the potential to scaremonger.
      I couldn't have put it better myself. I guess some people just think that taking their insecurities out on other people by undermining their struggles is acceptable when they don't have capacity to analyse their facts accurately.

      Posting this because it give a power trip is one thing. Posting it to manipulate you into befriending her and bribing you with information you already know in order to receive "rep" is another.

      So Maury, I guess you know what you have to do now! I won't say what because I'll probably getting barred from the forums.
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      (Original post by devon87)
      "But if the college knows that you have decided to go to another university, instead of Kent University, your college may not award you high marks for your foundation programme."
      You can't just contradict yourself like that
      Hi devon.

      Firstly let me make it clear that I am not referring to Kent college.
      it was merely an example. this is evidenced by my sentence in my previous post.
      'lets say you're studying in Kent College for the foundation'.

      secondly, let me clarify.
      I was referring to foundation colleges and not foundation degrees.
      This is perhaps where the misunderstanding may have arose.
      I am truly sorry. I should have been clear.
      I regret my oversight.

      once again I sincerely hope you'll forgive me for being unclear earlier.
      1) I was not referring to Kent at all.
      2) I was not referring to foundation degrees.
      3) I was referring to foundation colleges aimed at international students.

      It was an honest mistake.
      I am sorry.

      (Original post by Blackacre)
      So if the college is deliberately marking students down to "penalise" them for not staying on for university, how does that not constitute corruption or falsely marking scripts?

      With the greatest respect, you're not qualified to be passing judgement like this. You're not an admissions tutor or an examiner, and from your post history I believe you're still in the process of applying to university.

      One of the most important traits a lawyer can have is not being afraid to say "I don't know and this is outside of my expertise". I'd suggest that you consider whether the content of your post is something about which you're truly knowledgeable before posting something that has the potential to scaremonger.
      Hi Blackacre.

      in my opinion, most foundation colleges are money-making machines.

      international students have to undergo an extra term for English.
      if they fail the exams at the end of the term, they are allowed a resit.
      if they fail that resit as well, they are sent back to their country.
      but here lies the mystery.

      I could be wrong about the following or the rules may have changed.
      under UK visa rules, you have to return back to your home country first,
      before you re-apply for another student visa which will incorporate the new college that you will be studying in.

      the smarter international students who fail the english exams at the first term or the foundation programme simply get their agents to apply to another college whilst they remain in the UK.

      but as i've said above, perhaps the rules have changed.

      now why would a college allow international students to leave their home country and travel to UK to undergo a term in UK for english lessons when the college knows that the student is more likely to fail the exams?

      how can anyone master english at beginner's level in such a short space of time?
      granted, you may cite the IELTS exams as a filter which is taken at the home country of the international students where by virtue of passing it, you are given the UK student visa along with meeting other requirements.

      but we now know that many international students cheat in IELTS as well.
      http://www.theguardian.com/education...essicashepherd
      http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2...full-statement
      http://www.theguardian.com/education...-test-cheating
      http://www.scmp.com/news/china/artic...t-affect-their
      http://www.wantinews.com/news-640980...-students.html
      http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-26024375

      Most of the lower ranked international colleges will magically pass students in their foundation certificate so that they will enter the sister university.
      this is because
      1) the sister universities do not attract enough international students
      2) international students pay up their fees in full unlike the luxury that Home students have of getting a student loan and paying it within 20/30 years.

      but then again we now know that many of these loans have been or will be written off.
      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education...itten-off.html
      http://www.independent.co.uk/student...f-8969066.html
      http://money.aol.co.uk/2014/02/14/wa...oan-write-off/
      http://www.bbc.com/news/education-26688018

      in hindsight, the above is not important because it refers to colleges offering foundation programmes to international students.

      I would like to apologize to you as well for the misunderstanding which arose due to my fault and mine alone.
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      (Original post by Maura Kat)
      Hi devon.

      Firstly let me make it clear that I am not referring to Kent college.
      it was merely an example. this is evidenced by my sentence in my previous post.
      'lets say you're studying in Kent College for the foundation'.

      secondly, let me clarify.
      I was referring to foundation colleges and not foundation degrees.
      This is perhaps where the misunderstanding may have arose.
      I am truly sorry. I should have been clear.
      I regret my oversight.

      once again I sincerely hope you'll forgive me for being unclear earlier.
      1) I was not referring to Kent at all.
      2) I was not referring to foundation degrees.
      3) I was referring to foundation colleges aimed at international students.
      Why would you complicate matters by giving an example when the location of my foundation year is known? Have you even read the first sentence of my post?

      Given this, exactly what did your first post hope achieve? If you weren't referring to anything in the original post why did you waste your time and post at all?

      All I'd like to put forward is that forgiving you for "being unclear" does not justify that your post could've potentially made someone think that they had no hope of getting anywhere.

      In all fairness you should be apologising for the fact that you didn't intend to help in the first place but you just wanted to sound like you know something about a subject and then when challenged, goes off on a tangent about something else completely unrelated whilst contradicting everything you just said. Is that what Cambridge looks for?
     
     
     
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