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    I know the following chords: A, Am, D, Dm, E, Em, G, G7, C, C7, B7, and mini bar F.

    I'm currently, trying to switch between the chords as quickly as I can (aiming for 60 changes, between two chords, a minute). I want to get quite good at chord changes, but there are too many chords, I assume the total number of combination above will be 56 pairs (e.g. A+Am, A+D, etc)!

    To my knowledge, chords belongs to keys (or groups) where all chords within a given key will sound good, but picking chords between different keys (groups) will sound bad. If this is true, then I wont have to use all 56 chord combinations (since some of them will sound bad so I wont need them).

    So my question is how do I find out all the (allowed) 2-chord combinations from the list of chords above?
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    (Original post by 00100101)
    I know the following chords: A, Am, D, Dm, E, Em, G, G7, C, C7, B7, and mini bar F.

    I'm currently, trying to switch between the chords as quickly as I can (aiming for 60 changes, between two chords, a minute). I want to get quite good at chord changes, but there are too many chords, I assume the total number of combination above will be 56 pairs (e.g. A+Am, A+D, etc)!

    To my knowledge, chords belongs to keys (or groups) where all chords within a given key will sound good, but picking chords between different keys (groups) will sound bad. If this is true, then I wont have to use all 56 chord combinations (since some of them will sound bad so I wont need them).

    So my question is how do I find out all the (allowed) 2-chord combinations from the list of chords above?
    Not entirely sure I understand, but here is a link to the cycle of fifths and the major chord progressions:

    http://louistata.com/circle_of_fifth.htm

    Should tell you what goes with what.

    Chords normally come in groups of three that go together, rather than pairs.
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    (Original post by 00100101)
    I know the following chords: A, Am, D, Dm, E, Em, G, G7, C, C7, B7, and mini bar F.

    I'm currently, trying to switch between the chords as quickly as I can (aiming for 60 changes, between two chords, a minute). I want to get quite good at chord changes, but there are too many chords, I assume the total number of combination above will be 56 pairs (e.g. A+Am, A+D, etc)!

    To my knowledge, chords belongs to keys (or groups) where all chords within a given key will sound good, but picking chords between different keys (groups) will sound bad. If this is true, then I wont have to use all 56 chord combinations (since some of them will sound bad so I wont need them).

    So my question is how do I find out all the (allowed) 2-chord combinations from the list of chords above?
    (Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
    Not entirely sure I understand, but here is a link to the cycle of fifths and the major chord progressions:

    http://louistata.com/circle_of_fifth.htm

    Should tell you what goes with what.

    Chords normally come in groups of three that go together, rather than pairs.

    Yeah, there are certain chords that work together, and you find that many song follow the same chord progressions, for example G-D-E-C, this tend to be used in a few songs.

    Once you have mastered a few chords, you will find different patterns to play them in and it should soud nice
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    A chord needs three notes. One or two notes isn't a chord.
    If you want to be able to change chords quickly, barre chords are really easy until you learn the intricacies.
    But there are innumerable chords, once you learn major and minor prepare for 7ths, 9ths, 5ths, then augmented or diminished, 13ths 15ths and 17ths, Neapolitan or German, chords with a specific note in the bass or inversions, or simply modal chords. I wouldn't try making a ticklist if I were you.
    If you learn music theory you'll learn how to work out which chords in a key work well- for example in a major key there's the tonic, subdominant and dominant, yet the supertonic and submediant can work well as they are minor chords in the major scale. Also the leading note can function well as a transitionary chord.
    TLDR: it's best to learn through experience or music theory, not trying to shortcut between the two.
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    ProppaNutty THX!
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    (Original post by jillymayr)
    ProppaNutty THX!
    No worries, I was in the same position as one once, trying to teach yourself guitar
 
 
 
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