Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi all,
    I am hopefully going to university either this year or next year, depending on whether I decide to have a break and what to study specifically.

    Throughout different levels of education, teachers have claimed I would be a mathematician, I'm not sure why. My SATs and GCSE results were very good in maths, but my A level results seem to fluctuate.

    For example, I have managed to get 95%+ in Core 1 and Stats 1, and some mocks in core 2 and decision 1, but when it comes to the actual exam, I fall apart. I think I've only managed 60% in Core 3 and 4, which I know I can do much better.
    However, my friends are currently doing maths degrees, but they aren't recommending the subject at degree level. They say it's very difficult, stressful, and very boring. I know some will find it different but is that how most students feel at uni with this subject? These students also managed straight As or even A*s.

    So, my questions are:
    Would you recommend a maths degree, particularly if I resit the poor results in some modules?
    Are there other degree courses I could take that are similar to maths but not maths itself?

    Thanks for reading
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    If you KNOW you have the ability, and you really love maths (listen to yourself, not anyone else) then you should think about doing it.

    Again, assuming you have the ability, there is nothing you cannot achieve in an exam if you have the self-belief enough to want to do well at it.

    Exams are all about practice and preparation - not to mention having the balls to know you`re going to "kill it"!

    I found the best preparation for my exams at uni (I was never much good at exams at school, so this is just from a university point of view) was, I`ll admit, a little unorthodox:

    I got into meditation - not in a big way, but I learned enough to concentrate my mind on what I wished to accomplish, and meditated on it.

    Also, in my exams, I would take a packet of mints (specifically polos) with me, and after each question (during which I would breathe as relaxed as I could, I would pop a polo, and sit there with my arms folded for 1 munite to relax myself.

    I never got below 84% in any exam! - from being crap at them before uni!

    - brief advice, I know, but I hope it night help somewhat
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Study Helper
    Maths at university is very different from A-level maths, which more closely resembles university physics in a number of aspects. Maths at university is all about proving things and dealing with the abstract side of numeracy - when this is applied (as it is for almost all parts of the A-level) you have physics.

    To me, you don't seem to be all that interested in maths, but instead have just been told you should be (your C3 and C4 module results would seem to reflect this). This is the wrong reason to go into any subject at degree level, particularly one as demanding as maths - when you're going to spend 30-40 hours a week on a single subject (as a minimum), it helps if you find it interesting.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tory88)
    Maths at university is very different from A-level maths, which more closely resembles university physics in a number of aspects. Maths at university is all about proving things and dealing with the abstract side of numeracy - when this is applied (as it is for almost all parts of the A-level) you have physics.

    To me, you don't seem to be all that interested in maths, but instead have just been told you should be (your C3 and C4 module results would seem to reflect this). This is the wrong reason to go into any subject at degree level, particularly one as demanding as maths - when you're going to spend 30-40 hours a week on a single subject (as a minimum), it helps if you find it interesting.
    (Original post by Hasufel)
    If you KNOW you have the ability, and you really love maths (listen to yourself, not anyone else) then you should think about doing it.

    Again, assuming you have the ability, there is nothing you cannot achieve in an exam if you have the self-belief enough to want to do well at it.

    Exams are all about practice and preparation - not to mention having the balls to know you`re going to "kill it"!

    I found the best preparation for my exams at uni (I was never much good at exams at school, so this is just from a university point of view) was, I`ll admit, a little unorthodox:

    I got into meditation - not in a big way, but I learned enough to concentrate my mind on what I wished to accomplish, and meditated on it.

    Also, in my exams, I would take a packet of mints (specifically polos) with me, and after each question (during which I would breathe as relaxed as I could, I would pop a polo, and sit there with my arms folded for 1 munite to relax myself.

    I never got below 84% in any exam! - from being crap at them before uni!

    - brief advice, I know, but I hope it night help somewhat
    Hi, thanks for your responses.

    I can commit to a subject like maths, and I know I have the ability to study it.
    Unfortunately I was suffering from depression this year for personal reasons, but I did not take any medication as the doctor thought I didn't need it. (Sorry I didn't mention this earlier).
    I know core 1 is easy but if you're getting 100 per cent in the exam that surely shows ability?
    I was considering studying something along the lines at maths at uni, like for example: Meteorology, but I'm not sure what the employment rate etc would be.

    I will likely be taking a gap year to rest my head for a little and gain some work experience to motivate myself for the following year. I listen to meditation now as it really does benefit oneself.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    60% in C3 and C4 is pretty low, retake and if you fail again then really I don't see how you could well at maths when the uni material is x10 harder
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AT_17)
    Hi, thanks for your responses.

    I can commit to a subject like maths, and I know I have the ability to study it.
    Unfortunately I was suffering from depression this year for personal reasons, but I did not take any medication as the doctor thought I didn't need it. (Sorry I didn't mention this earlier).
    I know core 1 is easy but if you're getting 100 per cent in the exam that surely shows ability?
    I was considering studying something along the lines at maths at uni, like for example: Meteorology, but I'm not sure what the employment rate etc would be.

    I will likely be taking a gap year to rest my head for a little and gain some work experience to motivate myself for the following year. I listen to meditation now as it really does benefit oneself.

    I understand your situation - I had to leave university for a year because both a very close uncle, and then my Dad died within the space of a few months - however hard I concentrated, I wasn`t getting ANY questions correct - so just decided to get away from it and clear my head.

    I found that maths made me happy - because it rewarded me for hard work - there`s nothing like the buzz you get when you work your arse of at a difficulty problem and find the correct answer! - such a rush!

    If you want to cover your options, why not think about doing a joint degree?

    I just did straight maths - and now I`m a "Law Accountant" (that`s what they call them here in Scotland - in England they`re called "Law Cost Draftsmen/women"......

    (see this):

    http://www.kain-knight.co.uk/resourc...osts-draftsman

    .....but at my Uni (Strathclyde) they had:

    Maths and Statistics,
    Maths, Statistics and Accounting,
    Maths, Statistics and Finance (no - I don`t know what the difference is)

    .....again, I hope I`ve helped somewhat!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hasufel)
    I understand your situation - I had to leave university for a year because both a very close uncle, and then my Dad died within the space of a few months - however hard I concentrated, I wasn`t getting ANY questions correct - so just decided to get away from it and clear my head.

    I found that maths made me happy - because it rewarded me for hard work - there`s nothing like the buzz you get when you work your arse of at a difficulty problem and find the correct answer! - such a rush!

    If you want to cover your options, why not think about doing a joint degree?

    I just did straight maths - and now I`m a "Law Accountant" (that`s what they call them here in Scotland - in England they`re called "Law Cost Draftsmen/women"......

    (see this):

    http://www.kain-knight.co.uk/resourc...osts-draftsman

    .....but at my Uni (Strathclyde) they had:

    Maths and Statistics,
    Maths, Statistics and Accounting,
    Maths, Statistics and Finance (no - I don`t know what the difference is)

    .....again, I hope I`ve helped somewhat!

    Very sorry to hear about that, you've done fantastic to cope with those circumstances!
    I have chosen to do Maths with a Language but I need AAB, and unfortunately I think I've got BBB, maybe ABB.
    I studied stats at A Level so that may help, I prefer to do something maths based but not a maths degree.
    So, meteorology, aeronautical etc. I like some parts of maths but not all of it.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AT_17)
    Very sorry to hear about that, you've done fantastic to cope with those circumstances!
    I have chosen to do Maths with a Language but I need AAB, and unfortunately I think I've got BBB, maybe ABB.
    I studied stats at A Level so that may help, I prefer to do something maths based but not a maths degree.
    So, meteorology, aeronautical etc. I like some parts of maths but not all of it.
    *broken record* coming up

    Wait for results day

    See what you have achieved

    See why offers you then hold

    Talk to us over on Admissions and UCAS if needs be

    Take your time in making decisions
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    In my opinion, doing well at A-Level (and yes I'm even referring to getting 98%+ in both Maths and Further) is not indicative of the kind of ability required to do it at a good university, but getting less than A*A* in the two subjects without a good reason (it seems you have a good one) is usually a good sign that person isn't cut out for it at a top university. Teachers can be quite over-zealous in recommending 'high-flying' GCSE/A-Level maths students study mathematics at university, when in reality the kind of problem-solving you do at A-Level is more indicative of the work you'd do in other quantitative degrees.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Noble.)
    In my opinion, doing well at A-Level (and yes I'm even referring to getting 98%+ in both Maths and Further) is not indicative of the kind of ability required to do it at a good university, but getting less than A*A* in the two subjects without a good reason (it seems you have a good one) is usually a good sign that person isn't cut out for it at a top university. Teachers can be quite over-zealous in recommending 'high-flying' GCSE/A-Level maths students study mathematics at university, when in reality the kind of problem-solving you do at A-Level is more indicative of the work you'd do in other quantitative degrees.
    That's exactly how I see it.
    I know someone who managed straight As, close to an A*, so this person is at a top university, but failed most of his first year exams.

    I think maths at A Level needs to be similar to degree level, it doesn't sound it.
    Imagine paying £9,000, going to a top uni miles and miles away, and then not succeeding?
    Many, many people appear to be changing course.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you rather give up salt or pepper?
    Useful resources

    Make your revision easier

    Maths

    Maths Forum posting guidelines

    Not sure where to post? Read the updated guidelines here

    Equations

    How to use LaTex

    Writing equations the easy way

    Student revising

    Study habits of A* students

    Top tips from students who have already aced their exams

    Study Planner

    Create your own Study Planner

    Never miss a deadline again

    Polling station sign

    Thinking about a maths degree?

    Chat with other maths applicants

    Can you help? Study help unanswered threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.