grant-m-s
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Hi Guys

I'm really struggling to decide which to go for, I do enjoy maths a lot but I'm worried that by doing computer science and maths I will be at a disadvantage to someone doing a full computer science degree when it comes to getting a job after my degree. However I can also see how having mathematics modules can help in certain areas. How much of the computer science course will I be missing out on by doing the joint degree? And will this affect me after the degree if I pursue a career in computer science?

The universities i'm looking at are:

-Bath
-Bristol
-Cambridge
-Durham
-Warwick

If any of your guys do the computer science (and maths) (or Discrete maths for Warwick) courses at any of these, any information you can give would be great

thanks
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EmmaFromZealify
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Hi Grant,

I work at a company who are in the tech industry and I would really advise you to study Computer Science with Maths.

Developers are in high demand at the moment, especially Developers who can code in the right language. Im not sure how advanced your computer science knowledge is but there are a variety of coding languages that go in and out of trend all the time. At the moment two of the most common languages being used are Ruby on rails and Python (to give you an idea if you want to pursue learning them). Companies really struggle to find developers in the specific code they need so end up paying a premium for them which is great news for students looking to enter the industry!

In relation to your concerns about missing out on half of the subjects through studying both at the same time, honestly do not worry. Maths and computer science are really complimentary and both highly desirable. Our feedback from employers is that computer science only gives a theoretical foundation and nothing that is practically useful in terms of work. It's great to have this base understanding but its the practical skills and projects that will make you stand out above the crowd. Maths is highly transferable so a combination of them both is incredibly appealing to employers. If you can start your on side projects whilst you are at university (e.g. build your own website) and stay in touch with what is happening in the industry you will not struggle to find employment.

I hope this helps!
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Damask-
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(Original post by grant-m-s)
Hi Guys

I'm really struggling to decide which to go for, I do enjoy maths a lot but I'm worried that by doing computer science and maths I will be at a disadvantage to someone doing a full computer science degree when it comes to getting a job after my degree. However I can also see how having mathematics modules can help in certain areas. How much of the computer science course will I be missing out on by doing the joint degree? And will this affect me after the degree if I pursue a career in computer science?

The universities i'm looking at are:

-Bath
-Bristol
-Cambridge
-Durham
-Warwick

If any of your guys do the computer science (and maths) (or Discrete maths for Warwick) courses at any of these, any information you can give would be great

thanks
I do CS at Bath, and without wanting to scare you at all, a ridiculous proportion of those doing CS and maths in my year (just finished first) failed compared to those on just straight CS. You miss out on all the architecture stuff (networking, hardware, operating systems etc) and the group projects meaning you have a lot less coding and software engineering experience from first year.

You'd also miss out on the maths modules we do in CS (predicate calculus and stuff, and then analytical) which makes up ¼ of the course.
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grant-m-s
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(Original post by Damask-)
I do CS at Bath, and without wanting to scare you at all, a ridiculous proportion of those doing CS and maths in my year (just finished first) failed compared to those on just straight CS. You miss out on all the architecture stuff (networking, hardware, operating systems etc) and the group projects meaning you have a lot less coding and software engineering experience from first year.

You'd also miss out on the maths modules we do in CS (predicate calculus and stuff, and then analytical) which makes up ¼ of the course.

This is one of my main worries. Would you say that you have learnt enough maths for all the types of programming you've done?



(Original post by EmmaFromZealify)
Hi Grant,

I work at a company who are in the tech industry and I would really advise you to study Computer Science with Maths.

Developers are in high demand at the moment, especially Developers who can code in the right language. Im not sure how advanced your computer science knowledge is but there are a variety of coding languages that go in and out of trend all the time. At the moment two of the most common languages being used are Ruby on rails and Python (to give you an idea if you want to pursue learning them). Companies really struggle to find developers in the specific code they need so end up paying a premium for them which is great news for students looking to enter the industry!

In relation to your concerns about missing out on half of the subjects through studying both at the same time, honestly do not worry. Maths and computer science are really complimentary and both highly desirable. Our feedback from employers is that computer science only gives a theoretical foundation and nothing that is practically useful in terms of work. It's great to have this base understanding but its the practical skills and projects that will make you stand out above the crowd. Maths is highly transferable so a combination of them both is incredibly appealing to employers. If you can start your on side projects whilst you are at university (e.g. build your own website) and stay in touch with what is happening in the industry you will not struggle to find employment.

I hope this helps!
This is really helpful thank you But isnt learning and securing programming by doing the single degree going to benefit me more?
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Damask-
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(Original post by grant-m-s)
This is one of my main worries. Would you say that you have learnt enough maths for all the types of programming you've done?
Definitely. The course at Bath is maths-y enough on its own IMO.
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grant-m-s
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(Original post by Damask-)
Definitely. The course at Bath is maths-y enough on its own IMO.
thanks that's good to know what programming languages do you use at Bath?
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Damask-
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(Original post by grant-m-s)
thanks that's good to know what programming languages do you use at Bath?
In first year, you do Python until around November, and then Java from then onwards with a little bit of Lisp. In second year, there's a whistle-stop tour through more Lisp, Haskell, Prolog, ASP, C, C++, Fortran, Cobol, Snobol, Icon, Apl, and Perl. Of these I think the most attention is given to C, C++, Haskell and Lisp.
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EmmaFromZealify
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(Original post by grant-m-s)
This is one of my main worries. Would you say that you have learnt enough maths for all the types of programming you've done?





This is really helpful thank you But isnt learning and securing programming by doing the single degree going to benefit me more?
I think you should talk to some students who do both courses and ask them what they do not like about their course. This will help you make a decision as you can find out exactly what each course entails.

I honestly think both are great degrees and whatever you choose will be a beneficial degree to have

Good luck!
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ihavemooedtoday
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I personally wouldn't bother with maths, unless you know you are interested in some very specific fields in computing (physical simulations, etc).

In 99% of programming jobs you don't really need anything more than pre-university level maths (simple trigonometry, simple calculus, etc).

If you do graphics programming you'll also need to know some linear algebra (matrix transforms).

And maybe some very basic statistics.

All of which should be included in a CS course.
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lukemtesta
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Just do straight CS (don't go cambridge for technology courses as their employment is significantly lower than newer universities).

At Surrey there was a lot of cross over between engineering and CS modules in the final year. CS required no maths at all, however final year you had the option to do electronic engineering topics, which are very maths heavy such as signal processing and computer vision. This is likely to be the cases at most institutions.

Just to add, the CS students typically struggled at EE modules due to prerequisit knowledge.. EE requires a heavy in-depth knwoledge of engineering mathematics while CS did one A-level like maths course in first year, so expect to lose your social life in third year!

for gaming: A company came and did a talk. They expect a thorough knowledge of linear algebra and mechanics, networking, parallel architecture and artificial intellegence. You will not cover these on a Maths + CS course. So please take this into consideration!
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Pza
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(Original post by lukemtesta)
for gaming: A company came and did a talk. They expect a thorough knowledge of linear algebra and mechanics, networking, parallel architecture and artificial intellegence. You will not cover these on a Maths + CS course. So please take this into consideration!
I'd say that statement is a broad, not all CS + Maths courses are equal just as not all CS courses are equal. The Cs/Maths course I'm signed up to start at Exeter in september has the option to cover most if not all of those. Some Cs courses are a lot more math heavy than others, the one I was gonna do at Exeter had only two math modules while the cs/maths one basically just gives me a bunch of options between maths and cs modules. Only required maths modules are basically the calc and linear algebra ones then its your pick from there.


Honestly though, after looking around I'm not sure I'd be willing to do maths/cs at anywhere else but Exeter, it really does vary OP so look at course structures and see what suits you. Some CS courses might already have enough maths.
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