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    Hello. I am an almost 21 year old student and in September I am starting a BTEC Extended Diploma in IT along with GCSE Math, English and Science at college.
    The universities I want to attend for Computer Science, require Maths A level along side it. My college has recently made available a Maths A level (Fast Track) part time course, but it seems to differ with other maths A level syllabus' I have seen. It is C1,C2,C3,C4,M1,S1.

    So my questions are, is this suitable for a CS degree? and also what will the difficulty be like? (since I haven't started GCSE Maths yet, only have essential skills in application of number level 2 right now).
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    The very best of courses usually ask for Further Mathematics as well I believe. I cannot comment on the difficulty right now since you haven't even started GCSE Mathematics yet. If you get an A* for it then there is a chance you'll do well in A-Level Maths.
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    Thanks for the quick reply. From what I've seen, it's namely oxbridge who want FM, though it doesn't hurt. FM isn't an option for me though as I would be doing A level maths part time, FM isn't offered for part time.
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    (Original post by cnova)
    Thanks for the quick reply. From what I've seen, it's namely oxbridge who want FM, though it doesn't hurt. FM isn't an option for me though as I would be doing A level maths part time, FM isn't offered for part time.
    Many top Universities offering the course also ask for Further Maths, but for most an AS in FM would be okay. It's still early and I don't know how good or bad you are at Maths but it is possible to learn both A-Level Maths and Further Maths yourself at home. If you are well organised it is possible to complete certain modules within 2-3 weeks.
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    (Original post by L'Etudiant)
    Many top Universities offering the course also ask for Further Maths, but for most an AS in FM would be okay. It's still early and I don't know how good or bad you are at Maths but it is possible to learn both A-Level Maths and Further Maths yourself at home. If you are well organised it is possible to complete certain modules within 2-3 weeks.
    I rather take A level maths from my college as it provides a lot more support, I don't have to arrange for an exam center and it's cheaper.
    I was awesome at mental Maths back in school. I passed my Engineering Maths modules in a work based Electronic Engineering one year level 3 qualification (This had Algebra, differential equations, logarithms, Trigonometry and such at a basic level)
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    (Original post by cnova)
    I rather take A level maths from my college as it provides a lot more support, I don't have to arrange for an exam center and it's cheaper.
    I was awesome at mental Maths back in school. I passed my Engineering Maths modules in a work based Electronic Engineering one year level 3 qualification (This had Algebra, differential equations, logarithms, Trigonometry and such at a basic level)
    In that case I guess you're well equipped for A-Level Maths, good luck with it all! Since you wish to apply for Computer Science it is worth doing small projects in your spare time to help your personal statement when you apply.
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    (Original post by L'Etudiant)
    In that case I guess you're well equipped for A-Level Maths, good luck with it all! Since you wish to apply for Computer Science it is worth doing small projects in your spare time to help your personal statement when you apply.
    Cool. Thanks for the guidance.

    I'm currently creating several very basic programs using VB.NET such as a tip calculator and a profit calculator. I am self teaching myself the Computer Science GCSE over the summer and have got about 100 pages in so the programs are very basic. I am also planning to build 14 websites and a Twitter clone over the summer using an online course from udemy. Would this suffice for now?
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    (Original post by cnova)
    Cool. Thanks for the guidance.

    I'm currently creating several very basic programs using VB.NET such as a tip calculator and a profit calculator. I am self teaching myself the Computer Science GCSE over the summer and have got about 100 pages in so the programs are very basic. I am also planning to build 14 websites and a Twitter clone over the summer using an online course from udemy. Would this suffice for now?
    You're welcome Certainly, those seem great, especially the website building!

    If you want something slightly tougher than Computer Science GCSE then you could sign up to websites like CodeCademy, Treehouse, CodeSchool and LearnStreet. The things you'll learn there will be a lot more significant than than the things at GCSE level and should give you a great advantage when you apply to University.
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    (Original post by L'Etudiant)
    You're welcome Certainly, those seem great, especially the website building!

    If you want something slightly tougher than Computer Science GCSE then you could sign up to websites like CodeCademy, Treehouse, CodeSchool and LearnStreet. The things you'll learn there will be a lot more significant than than the things at GCSE level and should give you a great advantage when you apply to University.
    Thanks for the ideas. I am already signed up and have used CodeCademy, only the HTML and CSS course though, I may start the JavaScript or Python course since my college uses JavaScript for some of the units and Python is a decent language to learn, or so I have read. I haven't tried out the others though. Treehouse and CodeSchool are a bit pricey, considering that it is free with others. I have never heard of Learn Street before, I will check it out. Thanks.
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    C1 twice? Is that a typo?
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    (Original post by Dilzo999)
    C1 twice? Is that a typo?
    Ah, yeah. It was. I have just changed it, thanks.
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    (Original post by cnova)
    Ah, yeah. It was. I have just changed it, thanks.
    That's better. I was just thinking as you said it differs, but those modules are the bog standard. I think you'll be fine .
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    (Original post by Dilzo999)
    That's better. I was just thinking as you said it differs, but those modules are the bog standard. I think you'll be fine .
    Oh, are they? most I have seen seem to do either M1 and M2 or S1 and S2.
    Cool, thank you.
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    (Original post by cnova)
    Oh, are they? most I have seen seem to do either M1 and M2 or S1 and S2.
    Cool, thank you.
    Yeah it depends on the school, my school does M1 and S1 and then the modules ending with 2 or more are in further maths. But pretty much M1 and S1 are what most schools opt for if you're only doing maths and not further maths as it's easier.
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    (Original post by L'Etudiant)
    The very best of courses usually ask for Further Mathematics as well I believe.
    (Original post by L'Etudiant)
    Many top Universities offering the course also ask for Further Maths
    What universities are you talking about? It's not even a requirement for Imperial, Oxford or Cambridge.
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    (Original post by Jooooshy)
    What universities are you talking about? It's not even a requirement for Imperial, Oxford or Cambridge.
    I apologise, I must have confused them with Mathematics and Computer Science joint courses.
 
 
 
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