I still don't exactly know what to study at University?

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AT_17
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Hi all,
I am currently 19 and hope to go to University either this year or next year.
There is an issue though, and it's a big issue; what to study.

I study maths, german and statistics and applied to study maths and german combined.
However, I feel that maths isn't for me at uni level, just at A level and below.
Also, German appears to be more fun and interesting, even though I have more talent in maths.

I was thinking of studying something maths related (i.e accounting) or studying two languages.
I can't make my mind up, so I think I might take a gap year.
Also, I'm worried about the job prospects for languages whereas an accounting degree for example will probably get you further (presumably). I do seem to have a strength in working with numbers etc. I'm not a fan of everything in maths, mainly just numbers

Does anybody have advice on what I could (or should) do?

Lastly, my head is a little tired of education at the minute so I feel a gap year is better for me.
Thanks for reading
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tory88
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Often those with language degrees are in demand by multinational companies, so something like German and Business Studies would serve to improve your job prospects. Maths at university is very demanding and much purer than at A-level, so if you feel uneasy about doing it and don't have a passion, my advice is to pursue German.

Taking a gap year is fine, provided you do something useful in it. If you were to apply for a German and Business Studies degree I would recommend perhaps travelling/working in Germany and getting a bit of work experience in a business you have contacts with or are interested in.
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AT_17
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(Original post by tory88)
Often those with language degrees are in demand by multinational companies, so something like German and Business Studies would serve to improve your job prospects. Maths at university is very demanding and much purer than at A-level, so if you feel uneasy about doing it and don't have a passion, my advice is to pursue German.

Taking a gap year is fine, provided you do something useful in it. If you were to apply for a German and Business Studies degree I would recommend perhaps travelling/working in Germany and getting a bit of work experience in a business you have contacts with or are interested in.
Thanks for your help!
I've always loved maths, but I feel it will be too difficult at uni.
Also I suffered from depression through my exams which hasn't helped.
I'm worried. In case I can't resit exams on my gap year at my age. Is it still possible?
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tory88
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(Original post by AT_17)
Thanks for your help!
I've always loved maths, but I feel it will be too difficult at uni.
Also I suffered from depression through my exams which hasn't helped.
I'm worried. In case I can't resit exams on my gap year at my age. Is it still possible?
One thing to note is that A-level maths more closely resembles physics at university than maths. Maths is much more about proving abstract concepts, whilst physics is about using these concepts. However, if you feel it will be too difficult and have another degree in mind, don't force yourself into something you're not 100% committed to - it will show in your personal statement and at interview.

I believe resits are still possible in a gap year, although I would speak with the exam officer at your college/sixth form to make sure. If you have extenuating circumstances, for which depression counts (provided you can get a doctor's note), then it's even more likely you'll be able to resit. It is worth saying that some courses at some universities won't accept A-levels taken over 3 years (Cambridge is the only one which springs to mind), although once again with extenuating circumstances this will likely be waived.
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AT_17
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(Original post by tory88)
One thing to note is that A-level maths more closely resembles physics at university than maths. Maths is much more about proving abstract concepts, whilst physics is about using these concepts. However, if you feel it will be too difficult and have another degree in mind, don't force yourself into something you're not 100% committed to - it will show in your personal statement and at interview.

I believe resits are still possible in a gap year, although I would speak with the exam officer at your college/sixth form to make sure. If you have extenuating circumstances, for which depression counts (provided you can get a doctor's note), then it's even more likely you'll be able to resit. It is worth saying that some courses at some universities won't accept A-levels taken over 3 years (Cambridge is the only one which springs to mind), although once again with extenuating circumstances this will likely be waived.
Thanks again.
I am leaning towards German and Italian/another language, whether another language would be just as good than Business I'm not sure.
The thing is, is that I'm pretty good at maths, but what sets me back is my self esteem/confidence.
If I can see the answer to the question in a certain amount of time, I will breeze the question. For example, I can finish a Core 1 paper in half an hour. However, when I do a Core 4 paper or even a Core 2 paper, if I see a question that makes my brain wonder why it appears difficult or the 'what is that' straight away, I panic.
The only way I feel that I can complete harder questions is to slow down, which I find difficult to do in timed conditions and in an exam hall. If somebody asked me randomly on the street, I actually could potentially solve it.
And I think this is where the depression etc ties in. Unless maths isn't for me at a higher level.
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tory88
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(Original post by AT_17)
Thanks again.
I am leaning towards German and Italian/another language, whether another language would be just as good than Business I'm not sure.
The thing is, is that I'm pretty good at maths, but what sets me back is my self esteem/confidence.
If I can see the answer to the question in a certain amount of time, I will breeze the question. For example, I can finish a Core 1 paper in half an hour. However, when I do a Core 4 paper or even a Core 2 paper, if I see a question that makes my brain wonder why it appears difficult or the 'what is that' straight away, I panic.
The only way I feel that I can complete harder questions is to slow down, which I find difficult to do in timed conditions and in an exam hall. If somebody asked me randomly on the street, I actually could potentially solve it.
And I think this is where the depression etc ties in. Unless maths isn't for me at a higher level.
No problem.

At university level, there are no questions like those you talk about - questions at university level are always "prove that...", plus maybe a hint as to the theorem. If you're uncomfortable at C3/4, then you're probably making the right decision to go down the language route.

Studying two languages is still quite employable, both in businesses and as a professional interpreter (where you're much more employable than if you only offer one language). If language is what you're interested in, go for it.
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AT_17
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(Original post by tory88)
No problem.

At university level, there are no questions like those you talk about - questions at university level are always "prove that...", plus maybe a hint as to the theorem. If you're uncomfortable at C3/4, then you're probably making the right decision to go down the language route.

Studying two languages is still quite employable, both in businesses and as a professional interpreter (where you're much more employable than if you only offer one language). If language is what you're interested in, go for it.
Core 4 definitely made me feel uncomfortable.
A problem that I found this year with the maths exams was that it required a lot more thinking.
I had this approach to maths when I was younger, all the time, but now not so much. What I found in this year's core 2 and 4 paper was that it required so much thinking.
Some teachers like to teach the typical 'robotic' route of learning, others don't.
For example, one maths teacher I had taught maths this method, got a D in an exam. Had a different teacher the following year to resit the exam, 4 lessons with him, came out with close to full marks.

AQA seemed to have changed their ways with exams without mentioning the concept they want candidates to think rather than revise the same types of questions.
I prefer thinking, but because past exams were more about 'remember that question you did that is similar,' I panicked and lost my confidence due to myself revising via this method. Can you understand what I'm saying.

I think some teachers need to realise that sometimes learning from a basic textbook doesn't work, you need to flip around things and ask questions from each topic in as many ways as possible.
Adding on to this, this years Core 1 paper was pretty similar to past exams, whereas core 2 and 4 were completely different.
There needs to be consistency in each exam, in terms of whether to need to think etc.
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tory88
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(Original post by AT_17)
Core 4 definitely made me feel uncomfortable.
A problem that I found this year with the maths exams was that it required a lot more thinking.
I had this approach to maths when I was younger, all the time, but now not so much. What I found in this year's core 2 and 4 paper was that it required so much thinking.
Some teachers like to teach the typical 'robotic' route of learning, others don't.
For example, one maths teacher I had taught maths this method, got a D in an exam. Had a different teacher the following year to resit the exam, 4 lessons with him, came out with close to full marks.

AQA seemed to have changed their ways with exams without mentioning the concept they want candidates to think rather than revise the same types of questions.
I prefer thinking, but because past exams were more about 'remember that question you did that is similar,' I panicked and lost my confidence due to myself revising via this method. Can you understand what I'm saying.

I think some teachers need to realise that sometimes learning from a basic textbook doesn't work, you need to flip around things and ask questions from each topic in as many ways as possible.
Adding on to this, this years Core 1 paper was pretty similar to past exams, whereas core 2 and 4 were completely different.
There needs to be consistency in each exam, in terms of whether to need to think etc.
There as been a drive in recent years to move away from using the same type of questions, and instead applying an element of problem-solving. Your teachers will have known this, and should have informed the class. This becomes much more prevalent with the introduction of a new syllabus in a year or so, where the main emphasis is on problem solving. So yeah, I get what you're saying.

This approach is much more closely representative of university exams, which are all about thinking around your problem and using a number of steps to get there. That's why the changes are coming in, but I can understand the shock of someone going through those changes.
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AT_17
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(Original post by tory88)
There as been a drive in recent years to move away from using the same type of questions, and instead applying an element of problem-solving. Your teachers will have known this, and should have informed the class. This becomes much more prevalent with the introduction of a new syllabus in a year or so, where the main emphasis is on problem solving. So yeah, I get what you're saying.

This approach is much more closely representative of university exams, which are all about thinking around your problem and using a number of steps to get there. That's why the changes are coming in, but I can understand the shock of someone going through those changes.
For example, I completed every past paper of Core 2, did extra questions in a book, but still only going to come out with a B. Frustrating.

It is about thinking, I prefer it, but I tried to adapt to the way of doing loads of questions and it doesn't work for maths, maybe for Law etc.
I'm really disappointed haha. I know I can do maths but it never goes right on the day, maybe it's exam pressure. I did have about 15 exams this Summer and just felt burnt out after a lot of revision
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