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    (Original post by Fahad)
    LOL, I was just asking.. i'm doing my physics GCSE this may/june.. and i'm predicted an A..
    Weird thread then.
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    (Original post by bono)
    Oversimplification and different notations isn't the same as "it's ********."

    How can it be BS if you are building on the foundations of GCSE, from where you left off?

    BTW: As for different notations, I suppose u mean things like ms^-1 instead of m/s etc. Still isn't incorrect though.

    BUT: Why on earth didn't they just teach it as "ms^-1" at GCSE, instead of pointless chopping and changing at AS/A2?!

    WEIRD.
    1. You need a higher understanding of maths for all the different notations

    2. Some of the lens crap they teach in GCSE are wrong, complete wrongness to the extreme. Even in A levels, they are not taught the whole truth.
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    (Original post by bono)
    BTW: As for different notations, I suppose u mean things like ms^-1 instead of m/s etc. Still isn't incorrect though.
    I should've made myself clearer.

    For example, with regards to speed equations:

    At GCSE, s = d/t

    At AS/A-level, v = s/t

    Different letters for different things.
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    (Original post by hornblower)
    I should've made myself clearer.

    For example, with regards to speed equations:

    At GCSE, s = d/t

    At AS/A-level, v = s/t

    Different letters for different things.
    What is wrong with using different letters?
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    (Original post by shiny)
    What is wrong with using different letters?
    Rysths erte eartoihoea sotiw fiuhfiw.

    I rest my case.
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    And what is that supposed to mean?
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    (Original post by hornblower)
    Rysths erte eartoihoea sotiw fiuhfiw.

    I rest my case.
    Surely its v = d/t?

    Where d = displacement.
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    (Original post by hornblower)
    I should've made myself clearer.

    For example, with regards to speed equations:

    At GCSE, s = d/t

    At AS/A-level, v = s/t

    Different letters for different things.
    Yes i agree, they should have used the same notations at GCSE.

    Because at AS Level, "s" means displacement, not speed. Why on earth they weren't consistent from GCSE onwards, I don't bloody know.
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    (Original post by 2776)
    Surely its v = d/t?

    Where d = displacement.
    Yes.
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    (Original post by shiny)
    And what is that supposed to mean?
    You get the point then.
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    (Original post by shiny)
    And what is that supposed to mean?
    Well, conistency from GCSE onwards in the notation used would be much better. It serves no other purpose than causing a bit of confusion at AS Level for those who have used such notation for 2 years or so. (only 4 some, most r ok with the change)
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    (Original post by hornblower)
    You get the point then.
    Albeit exaggerated.
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    (Original post by hornblower)
    You get the point then.
    v = d / t means absolutely nothing.

    Strictly speaking you should write:
    v = speed (m/s)
    s = distance (m)
    t = time (t)

    or some form of definition. This is what is done in scientific publications/reports.
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    (Original post by shiny)
    v = d / t means absolutely nothing.

    Strictly speaking you should write:
    v = speed (m/s)
    s = distance (m)
    t = time (t)

    or some form of definition. This is what is done in scientific publications/reports.
    v = s/t

    where v = velocity (or speed), s = displacement (or distance) and t = time.
    Units ms^-1.
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    He's got a good point there. But we are talking about the standard notations and definitions.
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    Better. I am actually looking at a question paper now where they have used d to represent depth and t for thickness which would imply that v is some ratio. GCSE/A-Level Physics conventions don't hold in the real world so get used to it.
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    (Original post by bono)
    Well, that's strange news to me. Must have been an exceptional circumstance then.

    But the number of colleges who would allow it is negligible.
    Exceptional circumstances....
 
 
 

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