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garytse86
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Are there any suitable backup courses for medicine?
There is one suggested by Imperial: bioengineering, are there any other ones?
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hornblower
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(Original post by garytse86)
Are there any suitable backup courses for medicine?
There is one suggested by Imperial: bioengineering, are there any other ones?
Something chemistry-related, or perhaps biology.

You can do a postgraduate conversion course in medicine.
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garytse86
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do you mean an accelerated course?
If so please tell me which specific courses allow you to study the accelerated course for medicine.
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hornblower
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(Original post by garytse86)
do you mean an accelerated course?
If so please tell me which specific courses allow you to study the accelerated course for medicine.

http://search.ucas.co.uk/cgi-bin/hsr...ICINE&single=Y
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Lucy
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(Original post by garytse86)
do you mean an accelerated course?
If so please tell me which specific courses allow you to study the accelerated course for medicine.
There is probably some variation when looking at acceptable degrees to get into different med schools for the graduate entry 'accelerated' course. Therefore it's a good idea to have a browse through a few medical schools' websites which should list what degrees they accept. e.g. For Oxford (just quoting Ox because I am assuming that quite a few of their suggested degrees would be acceptable at other med schools too):

"Anatomy; Anatomy with Physiology; Biochemistry; Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Biomedical Science; Biology; Botany; Chemistry; Chemical Engineering; Dentistry; Human Biology; Human Genetics; Human Sciences; Immunology; Marine Biology; Medical Sciences; Microbiology; Neuroscience; Neuroscience with Psychology; Pathology; Pharmacology; Physiology; Physiology with Philosophy; Physiology with Psychology; Plant Sciences; Psychology; Veterinary Pathogenesis; Veterinary Science; Virology; Zoology."
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Helenia
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Bear in mind, however, that competition for places on graduate medical courses is even more tough than that for undergraduate medicine. I would make getting into undergrad medicine a priority, and consider the alternative if the worst happens.
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SugarPlum
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Ok, I'm clueless so please don't shoot the inquisitive! Can you do a degree in the listed subjects (say, for example, human genetics) and then go to med school (and so do a post-graduate course in medicine) and become a doctor. Surely the degree has to be in medicine? I'm sure I'm mis-interpreting this, would someone mind helping me out? Thanks.
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Fluffy
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(Original post by garytse86)
Are there any suitable backup courses for medicine?
There is one suggested by Imperial: bioengineering, are there any other ones?
What do you mean by 'back up'???

If you're talking about courses that allow you to transfer to medicine, these are a) few and far between and b) very competative (usually say 5 places and 500 people after them).

Personally I would concentrate on getting great A-levels and gap and reapply if need be, than take a second best option that you only chase because of that slim (and certainly not guarenteed) option of transfer...
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Fluffy
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(Original post by hornblower)
Something chemistry-related, or perhaps biology.

You can do a postgraduate conversion course in medicine.
Entry to med school as a grad on a GEP is 20 times more competative than as a school leaver (UCAS 2003 figures, plus personal experience!)

You have the chance to do it now. Give it your best shot!
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Fluffy
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GEPs for 2004 and entrance exams where required...

Barts and the London - entrance exam the PQA. Cost £25
St Georges Hospital Medical School - entrance exam the GAMSAT. Cost £170
GKT - entrance exam the MSAT. Cost £80

Swansea - entrance exam the GAMSAT (see SGHMS)
Birmingham - no entrance exam yet, although talk of introducing one. Only take 1sts.
LWMS - SAF for Warwick nothing for Leci. free
Oxford - Oxford graduate med entry exam - £25. Only took 1sts in 2003 (although saif 2i), 1sts and 2i in 2004
Cambridge - BMAT - £15
Soton - no entry exam. No interview either!
Notts (Derby) - entrance exam GAMSAT (See SGHMS) NB Notts do a joint interview thing with SGHMS if you pass GAMSAT.
Liverpool - no exam
Newcastle - ne exam. Only take 1sts
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Helenia
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(Original post by SugarPlum)
Ok, I'm clueless so please don't shoot the inquisitive! Can you do a degree in the listed subjects (say, for example, human genetics) and then go to med school (and so do a post-graduate course in medicine) and become a doctor. Surely the degree has to be in medicine? I'm sure I'm mis-interpreting this, would someone mind helping me out? Thanks.
Normal Medicine is a 5/6 year undergraduate course. However, if you have a relevant science degree (for example in one of the subjects listed above) it is possible to apply for an accelerated Medicine course lasting 4 years (with shorter holidays), because you'll presumably have covered some of the course content already. It means that graduates who decide to switch to Medicine can do so quickly and don't have to go all the way back to basics with the undergrads again.
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username9816
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(Original post by Helenia)
Normal Medicine is a 5/6 year undergraduate course. However, if you have a relevant science degree (for example in one of the subjects listed above) it is possible to apply for an accelerated Medicine course lasting 4 years (with shorter holidays), because you'll presumably have covered some of the course content already. It means that graduates who decide to switch to Medicine can do so quickly and don't have to go all the way back to basics with the undergrads again.
Surely if they had an interest in medicine, enough to do the accelerated course, then they should have done it in the first place? :confused:
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Lucy
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(Original post by bono)
Surely if they had an interest in medicine, enough to do the accelerated course, then they should have done it in the first place? :confused:
For example they may not have had the required grades to get into undergraduate medicine, didn't receive any offers from medical schools (and didn't want to take a gap year if hadn't taken one already) so their only option was to accept a place studying a less competitive but related subject and then in the future go into medicine through graduate entry (though it is much much harder so you really have to perform well in your current degree as well as getting a hold of a lot of experience/getting through the hugely competitive admissions process etc.). They may have also only been hit by the 'medicine bug' (i.e. started to consider a career in medicine) once already partaking in a degree/DPhil etc.
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username9816
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(Original post by Lucy)
For example they may not have had the required grades to get into undergraduate medicine, didn't receive any offers from medical schools (and didn't want to take a gap year if hadn't taken one already) so their only option was to accept a place studying a less competitive but related subject and then in the future go into medicine through graduate entry (though it is much much harder so you really have to perform well in your current degree as well as getting a hold of a lot of experience/getting through the hugely competitive admissions process etc.). They may have also only been hit by the 'medicine bug' (i.e. started to consider a career in medicine) once already partaking in a degree/DPhil etc.
Good answer.

I take it, they'd do a BioChem degree, or just straight Biology or Chemistry before applying for accelerated med. ?
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Lucy
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(Original post by bono)
I take it, they'd do a BioChem degree, or just straight Biology or Chemistry before applying for accelerated med. ?
Quite a range of degrees are acceptable (see previous post higher up), even subjects like botany
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username9816
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(Original post by Lucy)
Quite a range of degrees are acceptable (see previous post higher up), even subjects like botany
Sorry, but what's that? :confused:
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Lucy
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(Original post by bono)
Sorry, but what's that? :confused:
The study of plants
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username9816
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(Original post by Lucy)
The study of plants
Then going onto Med.?! Seems a bit too diverse...
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Lucy
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(Original post by bono)
Then going onto Med.?! Seems a bit too diverse...
Well I guess there are sufficient similarities between humans and plants. And quite a lot of the fundamental concepts apply to both organisms.
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Fluffy
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(Original post by Helenia)
Normal Medicine is a 5/6 year undergraduate course. However, if you have a relevant science degree (for example in one of the subjects listed above) it is possible to apply for an accelerated Medicine course lasting 4 years (with shorter holidays), because you'll presumably have covered some of the course content already. It means that graduates who decide to switch to Medicine can do so quickly and don't have to go all the way back to basics with the undergrads again.
St Georges and Notts take any degree subject for the GEP as long as you pass the GRIMSAT. GKT takes any degree for their GEP too again, as long as you do well in the MSAT. All taking nursing degrees (as long as they are honors) except Warwick as the course is split at LWMS, the health care professionals study at Leciecster and the scientists at Warwick.

Also the majority of graduates still use the 5 year route, as GEP competition is more than fearce. GKT had 1100 applicants for 23 places, BL about the same. Newcastle apparently had had 1500 applicants for 20 places. The figures are similar across the board for accellerated courses.

As a result a few GEP courses still use your A-Level grades (and GCSEs for that matter) to try to distinguish between candidates.
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