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Chem: Electrodes watch

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    So is the cathode always on the right hand side of the cell and the anode on the left? Is Standard Hydrogen Electrode always set up on the left? Thanks..
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    (Original post by Sugaray)
    So is the cathode always on the right hand side of the cell and the anode on the left? Is Standard Hydrogen Electrode always set up on the left? Thanks..
    It depends on whether it is the more negative electrode or not?
    Because in a chemistry book i saw it on the right..
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    (Original post by Sugaray)
    ?
    Ditto, "more negative..." didn't really make any sense, even though I don't do Chemistry A-Level.
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    i.e. -9V is more negative than -2V

    but by defenition, the anode will be more negative than the cathode.
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    (Original post by elpaw)
    i.e. -9V is more negative than -2V

    but by defenition, the anode will be more negative than the cathode.
    Elpaw, poland is joining the EU!
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    (Original post by bono)
    Elpaw, poland is joining the EU!
    april fools was 20 days ago
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    (Original post by elpaw)
    i.e. -9V is more negative than -2V

    but by defenition, the anode will be more negative than the cathode.
    so more positive = right
    more negative = left?
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    (Original post by elpaw)
    april fools was 20 days ago
    That was ollie's suggestion, sorry if it's wrong..
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    (Original post by Sugaray)
    so more positive = right
    more negative = left?
    it really doesnt matter, as long as you label it correctly (i.e. if writing the cell diagram, the sign of the E-standard value is that of whether the right hand electrode is positive or negative compared to the left hand electrode)
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    (Original post by elpaw)
    it really doesnt matter, as long as you label it correctly (i.e. if writing the cell diagram, the sign of the E-standard value is that of whether the right hand electrode is positive or negative compared to the left hand electrode)
    What is the 10 days for in your sig Elpaw?
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    (Original post by bono)
    What is the 10 days for in your sig Elpaw?
    if i wanted everyone to know that, i would have written it in my sig
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    (Original post by elpaw)
    if i wanted everyone to know that, i would have written it in my sig
    Is it to do with you, or something else? Please give me a clue.
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    (Original post by elpaw)
    if i wanted everyone to know that, i would have written it in my sig
    your mysterious sig only creates curiosity :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Sugaray)
    So is the cathode always on the right hand side of the cell and the anode on the left? Is Standard Hydrogen Electrode always set up on the left? Thanks..
    Set it up however you want but when writing cell diagrams the convention is always to put the hydrogen on the left i.e. Pt[H2(g)]|2H+ goes to the left of the porous plate. Like elpaw said before, just make sure that the polarity of the emf is that of the right hand electrode (i.e. of the metal being measured).
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    what makes you think its ten? maybe it's binary
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    (Original post by elpaw)
    it really doesnt matter, as long as you label it correctly (i.e. if writing the cell diagram, the sign of the E-standard value is that of whether the right hand electrode is positive or negative compared to the left hand electrode)
    Ok well i'm just confused because it says the

    Ecell value = Erighthand side - Elefthand side

    so how do u know what to put on the right hand side and which was on left hand side?
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    (Original post by elpaw)
    what makes you think its ten? maybe it's binary
    *yawn* That one has been done to death.
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    (Original post by Sugaray)
    Ok well i'm just confused because it says the

    Ecell value = Erighthand side - Elefthand side

    so how do u know what to put on the right hand side and which was on left hand side?
    it doesnt matter, because the formula will give the right values anyway! (i.e. it will give the polarity of the right hand electrode, and the correct E value)
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    (Original post by elpaw)
    it doesnt matter, because the formula will give the right values anyway! (i.e. it will give the polarity of the right hand electrode, and the correct E value)
    Ok well a question says: Which one of the following aqueous ions undergoes a redox reaction when mixed with aqeous iodide ions?


    Ag(+)
    Fe(2+)
    Fe(3+)
    Co(2+)
    Al(3+)

    So do u not have to decide which ones are feasible or not and therefore which one is on rhs and lhs to use the Ecell equation?
 
 
 

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