Ain't it a privilege to born at a NATİVE ENGLİSH SPEAKER'S country?

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Normalİnsan
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I suppose,you got what I meant.Almost everything is in english,even if not,concludes an englishness in it.

isn't it?
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andrew2209
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I sometimes do feel a bit disappointed in English people when I compare our foreign language skills to other nations. Unfortunately, as English seems to be a common "second" language to be taught abroad, we have the trouble of not having a "second" language to teach of our own. Also, our school system makes it difficult to teach languages effectively from the age of 5, like in Europe, unless we decided on only 1 language to teach.
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Observatory
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(Original post by Normalİnsan)
I suppose,you got what I meant.Almost everything is in english,even if not,concludes an englishness in it.

isn't it?
In many cases it doesn't seem to me.
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Kittythecat
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Well, I think not necessarily, you know if you are only talking about the language benefit, I don't consider that as a benefit at all. This, because you lose the requirement to learn different language by force of genuine need. Did you get my point?
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Normalİnsan
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(Original post by Kittythecat)
Well, I think not necessarily, you know if you are only talking about the language benefit, I don't consider that as a benefit at all. This, because you lose the requirement to learn different language by force of genuine need. Did you get my point?
But,ı know my character,ı always interested in languages,spanish is the second language of them as ı know,(US etc)
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Normalİnsan
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(Original post by Observatory)
In many cases it doesn't seem to me.
where are u from?
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vee_wuvshugs
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I personally don't think it is a privilege. In other countries, people learn in their native tongue while being exposed to English so they grow up bilingual. While in this country it is extremely difficult to learn a second language and become fluent unless you're of an ethnic minority.
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Normalİnsan
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(Original post by vee_wuvshugs)
I personally don't think it is a privilege. In other countries, people learn in their native tongue while being exposed to English so they grow up bilingual. While in this country it is extremely difficult to learn a second language and become fluent unless you're of an ethnic minority.
Learning english is not common for public,at most countries,just students learning for giving exams and thats all,at least for turkey (my poor country) situation is,this.
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username1039383
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I was thinking about this the other day. I'm very grateful
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Normalİnsan
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(Original post by Secretnerd123)
I was thinking about this the other day. I'm very grateful
UK,US,austuralia? which one
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Katie_p
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No, I think it's a disadvantage in the international workplace, or will be if we allow it to in the future.
Comparing myself to the average German student I've met on my Year Abroad, their English is as good as my German. Yes, there are a few who can barely speak it, but most are very proficient.
Comparing myself to the other international students I met on my Year Abroad, their English is as good as or better than my German, many of them were perfectly fluent, and if not, they were at least good at another "foreign" language as well: German.

When it comes to applying for jobs, who will look more attractive to an employer? Your average Brit with a GCSE in a language, maybe an A-level if you're lucky, or a native speaker from that country with excellent English skills?
In the unlikely event that I have children, no matter how good their natural ability at learning languages, I am going to make sure that they learn at least one, preferably two foreign languages, and can speak and write them at a good standard.
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username1039383
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(Original post by Normalİnsan)
UK,US,austuralia? which one
UK. I like my english accent too
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childofthesun
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Yes,but English is quite easy to learn imo
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Normalİnsan
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(Original post by Katie_p)
No, I think it's a disadvantage in the international workplace, or will be if we allow it to in the future.
Comparing myself to the average German student I've met on my Year Abroad, their English is as good as my German. Yes, there are a few who can barely speak it, but most are very proficient.
Comparing myself to the other international students I met on my Year Abroad, their English is as good as or better than my German, many of them were perfectly fluent, and if not, they were at least good at another "foreign" language as well: German.

When it comes to applying for jobs, who will look more attractive to an employer? Your average Brit with a GCSE in a language, maybe an A-level if you're lucky, or a native speaker from that country with excellent English skills?
In the unlikely event that I have children, no matter how good their natural ability at learning languages, I am going to make sure that they learn at least one, preferably two foreign languages, and can speak and write them at a good standard.
And you have a privilege and luck about knowing german too Most of our schools give german as second lenguage.What about turkish of course turkish has some advantages,when you compare african languages of course

Whatever,ı really love my language and country,but I wish I was one of the schwasrzkoph (I know ı wrote wrong ) who go to germany to work :P So,ı could learn german and english addition to Turkish :P
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vee_wuvshugs
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(Original post by Normalİnsan)
Learning english is not common for public,at most countries,just students learning for giving exams and thats all,at least for turkey (my poor country) situation is,this.
I guess it depends on the country. In mine, Zimbabwe, it's pretty common to be multilingual (knowing the two main native languages and english) or being bilingual (knowing english and one of the native languages).
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Normalİnsan
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(Original post by Secretnerd123)
UK. I like my english accent too
I don't want to be understood bad,but I really hate from british accent,are they eating words?They don't say them as a whole like americans :P

I remember a time that I loved british accent,the times that I watched sherlock
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MidnightDream
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'Tis quite nice actually :yep:
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Katie_p
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(Original post by Normalİnsan)
And you have a privilege and luck about knowing german too Most of our schools give german as second lenguage.What about turkish of course turkish has some advantages,when you compare african languages of course

Whatever,ı really love my language and country,but I wish I was one of the schwasrzkoph (I know ı wrote wrong ) who go to germany to work :P So,ı could learn german and english addition to Turkish :P
Don't get me wrong, I think being able to learn languages in school is great, but it's pretty standard across Europe, and most other countries that I've met people from do a better job of it, because their students "have" to be able to speak English to sell themselves, I guess.

But like you say, many people in Turkey learn German well enough to go and work there. Many Eastern Europeans learn English well enough to come and work here. Whatever problems people might have with that, they can't deny that the average school-leaving Brit couldn't up sticks and move to another European country and just settle in.
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Normalİnsan
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(Original post by vee_wuvshugs)
I guess it depends on the country. In mine, Zimbabwe, it's pretty common to be multilingual (knowing the two main native languages and english) or being bilingual (knowing english and one of the native languages).
I think its about historical events like wars,economical politics etc.

I don't know the history of zimbabwe,but I thought it's similar to İndia,about relations with anglo-saxons.İs İt? or the bilingual position of your public is arise from the knowledge and educational level ?
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username1039383
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(Original post by Normalİnsan)
I don't want to be understood bad,but I really hate from british accent,are they eating words?They don't say them as a whole like americans :P

I remember a time that I loved british accent,the times that I watched sherlock
Haha yeah we dont say full words sometimes
What country are you in and what do u study
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