isapisa
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Hello everyone! I am so overwhelmed and confused with choosing my future regarding my postgraduate studies

I have a B.Sc. in Psychology with a 1.2 (from an Austrian University) with a bachelor thesis specifically in the field of clinical psychology (and mindfulness psychology and intervention tools) and I want to move to the UK at the end of the year and apply for a postgraduate course which I find suitable to me.

I have some questions:
  • Is the DClinPsy seen as a 'longer Master equivalent' or can it be classified on the same level as a PHD?
  • If I want to work in the NHS, a DClinPsy should be the obvious choice, right? What about a doctorate in Counselling - will I be able to apply for the same or similar positions like clinical psychologists?
  • What exactly is the difference between the University courses in Counselling and individual psychotherapy schools?
    Or in other words: Is there a difference in the way of legality in working in your own practice between the two?
  • Are EdPsy and DClinPsy the only two pathways that are officially funded by the NHS? Counselling courses have to be paid completely by my own?
  • Are Master courses seen as "inbetweener" courses for students who don't have a good enough grade in their B.A.? Or can they be compared to a DClinPsy education, only more specific but also good enough for finding a good job afterwards?
  • I am so torn between studying a Master in Clinical Neuroscience, a Doctorate in ClinPsy or EdPsy or a degree in Counselling -- just from a subjective point of view: what would be the pros/cons of each pathway?
  • Also, I would like to combine councelling with research or a doctorate with councelling - are there any special courses in the UK who would offer this exactly?


Thanks a lot for your answers in advance!
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Lord Asriel
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Is the DClinPsy seen as a 'longer Master equivalent' or can it be classified on the same level as a PHD?
A DClinPsy is a doctoral level qualification, but is fundamentally different from a PhD in that it involves clinical placements in adult mental health, child, older adult and learning disability settings across three years, and substantial taught academic component (plus a research project). It is vocational clinical training, but also has built in research dissertation.

A PhD is basically a 3+ year research project, but has not compulsory taught programme/clinical element, and does not qualify you to practice as a clinical psychologist .

If I want to work in the NHS, a DClinPsy should be the obvious choice, right? What about a doctorate in Counselling - will I be able to apply for the same or similar positions like clinical psychologists?
It is, but if you are a foreign national you are unlikely to get on one because you don't have the right to work in this country (but there are a tiny number of international slots that you can pay for without a salary attached). See this for more details: https://www.leeds.ac.uk/chpccp/Basic...alFunding.html

You could do a doctorate in counselling psychology, which would make you eligible for many similar roles (but not necessarily the same, as there are differences in the training). These are all entirely self funded, and do not come with NHS salaries like the DClinPsy.

What exactly is the difference between the University courses in Counselling and individual psychotherapy schools?
Or in other words: Is there a difference in the way of legality in working in your own practice between the two?
Counsellng and Psychotherapy come from different orientations and training routes, have differing requirements and governing bodies. Psychologists are different again from both. Entire books have been written about philosophical and practical differences, and there isn't space to really go into it here.

Are EdPsy and DClinPsy the only two pathways that are officially funded by the NHS? Counselling courses have to be paid completely by my own?
EdPsych is not NHS funded. You would have to pay counselling courses by yourself, unless you have an employer funding you.

Are Master courses seen as "inbetweener" courses for students who don't have a good enough grade in their B.A.? Or can they be compared to a DClinPsy education, only more specific but also good enough for finding a good job afterwards?
MSc courses are good for expanding knowledge beyond undergrad, but aren't recognised as qualifications that enable you to practice in their own right in the UK. They form the basis of the first part of training for fields like forensic and health psychology (which need to be topped up by a subsequent doctorate, or Stage 2 qualification). MScs in clinical psychology aren't really recognised in themselves, but some feel they look good when applying to a DClinPsy.

I am so torn between studying a Master in Clinical Neuroscience, a Doctorate in ClinPsy or EdPsy or a degree in Counselling -- just from a subjective point of view: what would be the pros/cons of each pathway?
These are all fundamentally different pathways doing quite different jobs. I would recommend you research each of the pathways in depth to see what you would be doing in each role.

Also, I would like to combine councelling with research or a doctorate with councelling - are there any special courses in the UK who would offer this exactly?
A DClinPsy combines a therapy role with research component, as does counselling psychology doctorate (but not counselling training ).
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