Can Fascism be a good thing? And what is it anyway? Watch

SpikeyTeeth
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( Polite request: Please can people in denial of basic facts due to education system/ media brainwashing e.g. denial of push for “New World Order”, watch this before running their mouth off about things they don’t know anything about…… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QBSJvtkPICM . Please don’t run your mouth off unless you know what you are talking about. )

Eustace Mullins made an argument that fascism is packaged and sold as a bad thing because what it really means is law and order, and it would mean that the ruling elite would be far more constrained to the rule of law.

Does the antithesis of fascism just mean a free run of the super-elite and nose rings and coloured hair and freedom to criticise for the cattle.


“If the United Nations was created to fight "fascism", its mission ended in 1945, when Fascism was defeated by military force. Fascism derives its name from the bundle of rods which ancient Roman officials carried into court to punish offenders. Thus, fascism historically means law and order, the rule of law, and the intent to punish criminals. This, of course, is what the conspirators of the World Order wish to avoid at all costs. The Oxford English Dictionary defines Fascism as "one of a body of Italian nationalists which was organized in 1919 to oppose Communism in Italy." Other definitions state simply that the Fascists were organized "to fight Bolshevism". Thus the United Nations essentially was set up to battle against "antiCommunists" as exemplified by Germany, Italy and Japan. When this goal was successful in 1945, the United Nations no longer had a historic mission. Nevertheless, it continued to function, and the Rockefellers donated the most expensive parcel of real estate in Manhattan for its world headquarters. It was against this background that the Governor of New York, Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller, addressed a meeting at the Sheraton Park Hotel on July 26, 1968, in which he called for the creation of ‘a new world order’.”

Eustance Mullins
The World Order, 1992
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WakeUpWhitePPL
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I imagine it's all subjective a bit like racism. You can say the Nazi's were evil fascists but then you would hypocrites because the Nazi's fought against Communism that killed far more. People say Israel is a fascist state I think that's fair after all it Germany acted like Israel they would be called Nazi fascists.
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SpikeyTeeth
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(Original post by WakeUpWhitePPL)
I imagine it's all subjective a bit like racism. You can say the Nazi's were evil fascists but then you would hypocrites because the Nazi's fought against Communism that killed far more. People say Israel is a fascist state I think that's fair after all it Germany acted like Israel they would be called Nazi fascists.
I would not say that the Nazis were good or evil as that's a subjective thing. The 18 million civilian deaths charge has been disproved anywhere a free debate has been allowed. Nazi invasions into Poland and Czechoslovakia, and the fight with Russia were not derived from the fact that Germany had a fascist political system. This was due to political decisions that could be taken by any country with any political system and are therefore independent of the political system. So to measure if Germany was good or evil due to fascism you would have to measure true, validated things that are unique to that political system. Despite saying the 18 million civilian deaths is untrue, it is true that Germany interned civilians. But this is not unique to its political system. The U.S. did it in World War II and does it today in Guantanamo Bay. Communism has done it.

So what are the measurable things unique to fascism in Nazi Germany? National pride, no. North Korea has that. Racial identity. No African proponents of communism have that. Anti-semitism? No, Muslims and the far-left have that.

The only thing I can think of is rejection of the globalist international banking system and the global elite cartel of Rothschilds, Morgan, Rockerfellers, Bush's, Bectel corp, the neo-con clan etc.


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Comus
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Fascism has a number of defining characteristics including: corporatism (the fusion of government and corporate power), millitarism, nationalism (often accompanied by racism but not always) and authoritarianism.

More widely it aims to maintain the class system (often by attacking the rights of trade unions), even though fascists sometimes indulge in populist rhetoric; it is generally socially conservative - particularly with regards to sexuality and gender roles; as well as having a focus on what one might term 'national struggle', of strong nations v weak nations and thus attempts to justify colonialism and a strong executive branch of government. There is also a tendency towards protectionism in economic policy.

Ultimately, whilst there are multiple analyses of fascism and the above tendencies are common themes, it is difficult to set a list of criteria, given that unlike other political ideologies regarding alternative systems of government, it is lacking in theory to set such criteria by. It is also worth noting the differences between Italian fascism, Spanish fascism under Franco, and German Nazism (though that is regarded as a particularly extreme offshoot): there are even some who argue that Stalinism was/is actually a form of Slavic fascism.

I would like to point out that I oppose fascism.
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MacDaddi
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No Government should ever wield the kind of power that a Fascist one would. The power "created" to plan society is the kind of power you would only expect in the hands of a God; what about the individual?
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SpikeyTeeth
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(Original post by MacDaddi)
No Government should ever wield the kind of power that a Fascist one would. The power "created" to plan society is the kind of power you would only expect in the hands of a God; what about the individual?
Are the New World Order neocons: Henry Kissingerb, Zbigniew Brezezinski, Paul Wolfowitz, David Rockefeller et al exercising the kind of power you would expect in the hands of a God?


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Bill_Gates
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Fascism can be very good for building infrastructure, other than that nothing!
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karmacrunch
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I didn't read the OP but good things about fascism (in general) are:

- Gives people a sense of national pride
- Can make an economy stronger
- Capitalist so most people can have a good livelihoods

Yeah... that's it but honestly I think the negatives largely outweigh the few positives. :/
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MacDaddi
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(Original post by SpikeyTeeth)
Are the New World Order neocons: Henry Kissingerb, Zbigniew Brezezinski, Paul Wolfowitz, David Rockefeller et al exercising the kind of power you would expect in the hands of a God?


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Not at all. In no modern, Western society does one agent hold complete power; complete control over society's collective fate. Fascism does this
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SpikeyTeeth
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(Original post by MacDaddi)
Not at all. In no modern, Western society does one agent hold complete power; complete control over society's collective fate. Fascism does this
So do these acts now count as complete power:

- bankrolling Leon Trosky to ensure a Russian revolution
- starting the Frankfurt School to change the collective mind, and thus brought about the "hippy/ 60s 'revolution'" and social breakdown
- Push towards a One World Government
- The 2003 Iraq was based on rantings of an Iraqi taxi driver to an MI5 intelligence officer



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Kalarin
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Well OP it depends on what kind of society you want. Fascism takes from both communism/socialism and from capitalism. On the whole it tends to be more left wing in terms of its economics as it (the government) strives to provide a higher standard of living for its citizens. For example Hitler aimed to provide Germans with cars so used government control over VW to make cheap cars Germans could afford.

On the other hand it is historically focused on a sense of national crisis in relation to the nation. Usually it see's the peoples culture under threat. Fascism aims to create a single homogeneous nation with one culture, language etc. This can lead to perhaps more "racist" policies.

The problem with it is that like communism it has become muddied by history. There are many people who hate it. Some who love it and those who actually would agree with fascists on some policy. The problem is fascist has become too general a word and the meaning watered down.
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Zen Baphomet
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(Original post by Kalarin)
Well OP it depends on what kind of society you want. Fascism takes from both communism/socialism and from capitalism. On the whole it tends to be more left wing in terms of its economics as it (the government) strives to provide a higher standard of living for its citizens. For example Hitler aimed to provide Germans with cars so used government control over VW to make cheap cars Germans could afford.

On the other hand it is historically focused on a sense of national crisis in relation to the nation. Usually it see's the peoples culture under threat. Fascism aims to create a single homogeneous nation with one culture, language etc. This can lead to perhaps more "racist" policies.

The problem with it is that like communism it has become muddied by history. There are many people who hate it. Some who love it and those who actually would agree with fascists on some policy. The problem is fascist has become too general a word and the meaning watered down.
Wonderful answer.
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Aj12
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(Original post by SpikeyTeeth)
Are the New World Order neocons: Henry Kissingerb, Zbigniew Brezezinski, Paul Wolfowitz, David Rockefeller et al exercising the kind of power you would expect in the hands of a God?


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What do you think Fascism is? Could you offer a definition, ideally not one found in a dictionary because they tend to be very inaccurate.
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The Dictator
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I have some admiration for Mussolini, but beyond that, I'm not sure.

I guess it invokes a great spirit of community and encourages everyone to do their utmost for the glory, preservation and prosperity of the people, but can also unleash the deadly spirit of ethno-religious nationalism which has brought about wars and chaos. So...in general, no.
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SpikeyTeeth
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(Original post by Aj12)
What do you think Fascism is? Could you offer a definition, ideally not one found in a dictionary because they tend to be very inaccurate.
I am at a loss to define fascism. I was really aiming the question at the popular perception of fascism.

Given that I am at a loss to define it, I will take Eustace Mullins' definition which logically extended to ordinary people means a more ordered, less free society where the individual must follow rules set by the collective that are over and above "preventing other people from enjoying their liberty" and made as part of some determination of the good of the people as a whole.


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Comus
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(Original post by Kalarin)
Well OP it depends on what kind of society you want. Fascism takes from both communism/socialism and from capitalism.
If I remember correctly, Mussolini referred to fascism as the 'authoritarian centre'.
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