_JC95
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Hi,

I have firmed MORSE for 2014 entry and was wondering if anyone currently studying it could give any pros/cons and any general advice.

I have unusually studied double Maths, History and Biology at A level, what would you recommend I read up on regarding my lack of Economics knowledge? Also, is there any other reading you would recommend before starting the course?

What would you say the workload and difficulty are like? Thanks



Also, are there any other people who are planning to start studying the course this year?
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Motorbiker
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(Original post by _JC95)
Hi,

I have firmed MORSE for 2014 entry and was wondering if anyone currently studying it could give any pros/cons and any general advice.

I have unusually studied double Maths, History and Biology at A level, what would you recommend I read up on regarding my lack of Economics knowledge? Also, is there any other reading you would recommend before starting the course?

What would you say the workload and difficulty are like? Thanks



Also, are there any other people who are planning to start studying the course this year?

Bumping this for you.

Just to let you know TSR is releasing a big update this afternoon or tomorrow to help you connect with other students studying at the same uni/course as you.
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_JC95
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(Original post by Motorbiker)
Bumping this for you.

Just to let you know TSR is releasing a big update this afternoon or tomorrow to help you connect with other students studying at the same uni/course as you.
Great thanks I'll look out for it
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Motorbiker
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(Original post by _JC95)
Great thanks I'll look out for it

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/connect

:ninja:

Only went up a few minutes ago literally...
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jamesisenglish
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(Original post by _JC95)
Hi,

I have firmed MORSE for 2014 entry and was wondering if anyone currently studying it could give any pros/cons and any general advice.

I have unusually studied double Maths, History and Biology at A level, what would you recommend I read up on regarding my lack of Economics knowledge? Also, is there any other reading you would recommend before starting the course?

What would you say the workload and difficulty are like? Thanks



Also, are there any other people who are planning to start studying the course this year?
Hiya, I've just finished my first year of MMORSE.

I did double Maths, Physics and then AS English and French, so I had no economics background at all - didn't even read any books before I started. First term economics was painful (mainly due to the lecturer moving at a breakneck speed) but doable, and second term was far better with better lecture handouts and a more reasonable speed of delivery.

If you want to read anything, any beginner books on the quantitative side of general micro and macroeconomic theory are good, but they're not needed. I'd say the recommended textbooks for the course (macro at least) are essential once you start the course though.

It's not an easy degree course, but the work is definitely manageable. To put things into perspective, I went out at least twice a week until half way through third term and managed to pass with a first.

If you want to get ahead of the game, read up on some basic Analysis and Microeconomics, since those were the modules that myself and everyone I knew found most difficult. Learning to program in R would be good too, since they kind of throw you in the deep end with that in term 2.

Any other questions, feel free to PM me or reply here
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_JC95
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(Original post by jamesisenglish)
Hiya, I've just finished my first year of MMORSE.

I did double Maths, Physics and then AS English and French, so I had no economics background at all - didn't even read any books before I started. First term economics was painful (mainly due to the lecturer moving at a breakneck speed) but doable, and second term was far better with better lecture handouts and a more reasonable speed of delivery.

If you want to read anything, any beginner books on the quantitative side of general micro and macroeconomic theory are good, but they're not needed. I'd say the recommended textbooks for the course (macro at least) are essential once you start the course though.

It's not an easy degree course, but the work is definitely manageable. To put things into perspective, I went out at least twice a week until half way through third term and managed to pass with a first.

If you want to get ahead of the game, read up on some basic Analysis and Microeconomics, since those were the modules that myself and everyone I knew found most difficult. Learning to program in R would be good too, since they kind of throw you in the deep end with that in term 2.

Any other questions, feel free to PM me or reply here
Great, thank you!

Which halls did you stay in and what do you think about life at Warwick?
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jamesisenglish
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(Original post by _JC95)
Great, thank you!

Which halls did you stay in and what do you think about life at Warwick?
I stayed in Sherbourne - fantastic really, like a hotel. It gets billed as the antisocial halls but most of the flats in my block kept something in their door so everyone could get in, and the rooms are second only to bluebell in terms of quality.

Life at Warwick is great - I'm from a really rural area so it was great to live somewhere with actual stuff happening all the time. It's what you make of it really, if you're sociable and like going out, there's plenty of chance for that, and if you don't then you won't be forced to go out. Nights out in year 1 can get expensive since taxis aren't the cheapest, they're not bad if you share a full taxi though.

Like I say, you get plenty of work, but plenty of chance to enjoy yourself too - I didn't even set foot in library apart from to buy coffee until half way through term 3.
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Jackoclypse
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(Original post by jamesisenglish)
Hiya, I've just finished my first year of MMORSE.

If you want to read anything, any beginner books on the quantitative side of general micro and macroeconomic theory are good, but they're not needed. I'd say the recommended textbooks for the course (macro at least) are essential once you start the course though.

Any other questions, feel free to PM me or reply here
Sorry to bother you but is it possible you could link me to any of the books you suggest? I would really appreciate it mate.
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Jackoclypse
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(Original post by _JC95)
... who are planning to start studying the course this year?
Me! I am going 2014.
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jamesisenglish
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(Original post by Jackoclypse)
Sorry to bother you but is it possible you could link me to any of the books you suggest? I would really appreciate it mate.
I only really bought the recommended textbooks, for macro and micro econ respectively I used these two:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Macroeconomi...eywords=mankiw
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Microeconomi...G6ZNNZ86YS46G3

The macro book was infinitely more helpful than the micro, but it still helps to have them. They're also super expensive, so definitely try to find them for cheaper...

For the maths modules, anything based on introductory linear algebra and analysis would be helpful; I used this for analysis, and got by without a textbook for linear algebra:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Guide-Analys...ide+2+analysis

Probability is an area that I've historically had trouble grasping and I found this textbook really helpful:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/First-Course...ss+probability

I'm not really sure what else to say - you won't do any linear algebra, probability or macroeconomics until second term, so don't bother buying them too soon. I'd just say wait and see how you're finding the modules and use that to judge whether or not you need the bools - I know people that did just fine without them.

Anything else, feel free to ask
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Jackoclypse
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(Original post by jamesisenglish)
X
Thanks a bunch mate . I'll certainly see if I can find a place to get those at a reasonable price.
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jamesisenglish
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(Original post by Jackoclypse)
Thanks a bunch mate . I'll certainly see if I can find a place to get those at a reasonable price.
Just a quick edit to my post, apparently I was half asleep when I first typed it.

I meant to say you won't do linear algebra, probability or macroecon until term 2, so don't bother buying those books before christmas unless you come across them for a good price.
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Jackoclypse
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(Original post by jamesisenglish)
Just a quick edit to my post, apparently I was half asleep when I first typed it.

I meant to say you won't do linear algebra, probability or macroecon until term 2, so don't bother buying those books before christmas unless you come across them for a good price.
Thanks for your advice friend I just bought the microeconomics book on amazon for £20
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IMZL
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(Original post by jamesisenglish)
Hiya, I've just finished my first year of MMORSE.

I did double Maths, Physics and then AS English and French, so I had no economics background at all - didn't even read any books before I started. First term economics was painful (mainly due to the lecturer moving at a breakneck speed) but doable, and second term was far better with better lecture handouts and a more reasonable speed of delivery.

If you want to read anything, any beginner books on the quantitative side of general micro and macroeconomic theory are good, but they're not needed. I'd say the recommended textbooks for the course (macro at least) are essential once you start the course though.

It's not an easy degree course, but the work is definitely manageable. To put things into perspective, I went out at least twice a week until half way through third term and managed to pass with a first.

If you want to get ahead of the game, read up on some basic Analysis and Microeconomics, since those were the modules that myself and everyone I knew found most difficult. Learning to program in R would be good too, since they kind of throw you in the deep end with that in term 2.

Any other questions, feel free to PM me or reply here
I feel like ressurecting this year old thread! Just wondering what the job/internship opportunities there are for MORSE compared to the straight maths degree, in your experience?
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Foxab77
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(Original post by IMZL)
I feel like ressurecting this year old thread! Just wondering what the job/internship opportunities there are for MORSE compared to the straight maths degree, in your experience?
I think the starting salary for a M/Morse grad is quite a bit higher than the average warwick maths grad, if I remember correctly.
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IMZL
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(Original post by Foxab77)
I think the starting salary for a M/Morse grad is quite a bit higher than the average warwick maths grad, if I remember correctly.
Good to know, thanks😊 Just got an MMORSE offer a day and a half after applying!
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Leks
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(Original post by jamesisenglish)
I only really bought the recommended textbooks, for macro and micro econ respectively I used these two:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Macroeconomi...eywords=mankiw
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Microeconomi...G6ZNNZ86YS46G3

The macro book was infinitely more helpful than the micro, but it still helps to have them. They're also super expensive, so definitely try to find them for cheaper...

For the maths modules, anything based on introductory linear algebra and analysis would be helpful; I used this for analysis, and got by without a textbook for linear algebra:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Guide-Analys...ide+2+analysis

Probability is an area that I've historically had trouble grasping and I found this textbook really helpful:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/First-Course...ss+probability

I'm not really sure what else to say - you won't do any linear algebra, probability or macroeconomics until second term, so don't bother buying them too soon. I'd just say wait and see how you're finding the modules and use that to judge whether or not you need the bools - I know people that did just fine without them.

Anything else, feel free to ask
Great
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