DeceitfulDove
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#1
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#1
Currently working on a website design project and would like to gather some opinions from TSR.

What do you think are the (up to) ten most important/effective/must have elements that contribute to a functional, aesthetic and professional site?
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8472
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#2
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Golden triangle to have the logo.
Maximum of 4 "Animated" moving objects per page.
Not too many links.
For the homepage to be low file size so that it is easy and quick to load. Other pages can be larger.
Constant website design and theme (same fonts, colours, layout ect)
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DeceitfulDove
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#3
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(Original post by 8472)
Golden triangle to have the logo.
Maximum of 4 "Animated" moving objects per page.
Not too many links.
For the homepage to be low file size so that it is easy and quick to load. Other pages can be larger.
Constant website design and theme (same fonts, colours, layout ect)
Thank youuu here, have some rep :innocent:
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8472
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(Original post by DeceitfulDove)
Thank youuu here, have some rep :innocent:
If you want a longer chunk of feedback and such just say. I'll be happy to write it out. That way I can include examples.
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pane123
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I just want the website to do what it's meant to do. There is nothing more annoying that a website that looks good but turns out to be very hard to navigate.

Make sure you get to the point. On a restaurant's website, for example, all I really need to see is a menu and the address.

Make sure your site is properly integrated with social media and ensure that it looks good on mobiles/tablets.

And boobs help, too.
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DeceitfulDove
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(Original post by pane123)
I just want the website to do what it's meant to do. There is nothing more annoying that a website that looks good but turns out to be very hard to navigate.

Make sure you get to the point. On a restaurant's website, for example, all I really need to see is a menu and the address.

Make sure your site is properly integrated with social media and ensure that it looks good on mobiles/tablets.

And boobs help, too.
Thanks I'm PRSOM for you haha.

I will be sure to include boobs on my site about sustainable development :lol:
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8472
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(Original post by DeceitfulDove)
Thanks I'm PRSOM for you haha.
I repped instead. One gem less but close enough. :groovy:
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hellodave5
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#8
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Pictures of sexy women

I kid.

Don't forget psychology: http://www.webdesignerdepot.com/2010...of-web-design/
There was a good article I read during my degree but can't find it now
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Travisty
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Typography and colour schemes play a huge role. Try using colour wheels etc to come up with a tone of colours that match the purpose of the site and the type of visitors you're looking to get. Easy navigation etc and a website that isn't stale, so a way for it to update, etc. Social media is definitely a biggy right now and having it responsive for mobile/tablet is great also, as you never know what device someone could be visiting it on. Hope this helps!
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SEHughes
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#10
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#10
There's a lot of usability considerations that go beyond aspects of visual design like typography. What information does the website contain? How can that information space be conceptualised, and how can you build the architecture to support an intuitive typology of information? How can you make it easier to navigate through the information space?
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Booyah
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#11
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#11
(Original post by DeceitfulDove)
Currently working on a website design project and would like to gather some opinions from TSR.

What do you think are the (up to) ten most important/effective/must have elements that contribute to a functional, aesthetic and professional site?
From what I understand pornhub, Xvideos and Brazzers are quite popular... maybe you should take a leaf out of their books :goofy:
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TheVth
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Interactivity, simple layot and easy navigation.

Posted from TSR Mobile
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TornadoGR4
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If you could find a way to put an elephant on the site I would be more inclined to click :yes:
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PQ
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Good structure
Logical layout
Accessible to everyone (ie passing validation on http://validator.w3.org/ )
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Tootles
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#15
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#15
(Original post by DeceitfulDove)
Currently working on a website design project and would like to gather some opinions from TSR.

What do you think are the (up to) ten most important/effective/must have elements that contribute to a functional, aesthetic and professional site?
You're talking about usability heuristics, which made up a big lump of two of the three dissertations I wrote.

You've got Nielsen's Ten Usability Heuristics:
  1. Visibility of System Status - does the system tell you, where applicable, if there is anything that needs attention?
  2. Match between System and Real World - are there analogues between the system and the surrounding world; for example a home page might resemble a desktop or the title page of a book.
  3. User Control and Freedom - the user should be allowed control of what they need control of; for example if they are writing a post on a forum or in a thread of comments, they should be allowed to create and post their post, and subsequently edit or remove it as desired.
  4. Consistency and Standards - the system should maintain a consistent appearance throughout.
  5. Error Prevention - the interface should be designed such that errors cannot accidentally occur.
  6. Recognition rather than Recall - interface objects or widgets should be designed such that the user can recognize them, even on first use, without incurring the need to consult a manual or tutorial.
  7. Flexibility and Efficiency of Use - can the system be used quickly, to help the user achieve their goal with as few steps as possible, and can the system be used for whatever the user might need to do?
  8. Aesthetic and Minimal Design - the less there is, the less can go wrong.
  9. Help Users Recognize, Diagnose, and Recover from Errors - in the event that an error does occur, users don't want a string of error codes and 'Contact an Administrator' messages. They want to get out of it as quick as possible before they panic and run away.
  10. Help and Documentation - for other such times as help may be needed, make sure that help is provided in some form; though ideally a system should be self-documenting.


These are the most commonly cited heuristics in web design and interface design (at least, they are on IT degrees).

When I did my most recent dissertation, I designed a system of my own to ensure that graphical interfaces (originally of operating systems, but I'm sure that, at a stretch, they could be made to apply to a website or other application) can be as efficient and usable as possible. The points I came up with are:

  1. Simplicity and Openness - users should be made comfortable in doing what they need to do, and the system should make what can be done, what can't, and what needs attention as clear as possible.
  2. Simple Native Environment - parts of a system that serve different functions should be recognizably different; for example the main menu of a website should be different to the menu in the web browser.
  3. Easy-to-understand Graphical Widgets - graphical widgets should resemble real-world analogues and be easily recognized as meaning what they mean.
  4. Awareness of, and Friendliness toward, User Competence - yes, anything should be easy to use, but a veteran user doesn't want to be treated like a total newbie; imagine TSR being redesigned for younger users by Fisher Price.
  5. Aesthetic and Easy Elements - things should look nice and be easy on the eye.
  6. Consistency despite Evolution - an update/upgrade should not include a total change to the interface; this makes users uncomfortable.

I hope this helps.
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DeceitfulDove
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#16
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#16
(Original post by Tootles)
You're talking about usability heuristics, which made up a big lump of two of the three dissertations I wrote.

You've got Nielsen's Ten Usability Heuristics:
  1. Visibility of System Status - does the system tell you, where applicable, if there is anything that needs attention?
  2. Match between System and Real World - are there analogues between the system and the surrounding world; for example a home page might resemble a desktop or the title page of a book.
  3. User Control and Freedom - the user should be allowed control of what they need control of; for example if they are writing a post on a forum or in a thread of comments, they should be allowed to create and post their post, and subsequently edit or remove it as desired.
  4. Consistency and Standards - the system should maintain a consistent appearance throughout.
  5. Error Prevention - the interface should be designed such that errors cannot accidentally occur.
  6. Recognition rather than Recall - interface objects or widgets should be designed such that the user can recognize them, even on first use, without incurring the need to consult a manual or tutorial.
  7. Flexibility and Efficiency of Use - can the system be used quickly, to help the user achieve their goal with as few steps as possible, and can the system be used for whatever the user might need to do?
  8. Aesthetic and Minimal Design - the less there is, the less can go wrong.
  9. Help Users Recognize, Diagnose, and Recover from Errors - in the event that an error does occur, users don't want a string of error codes and 'Contact an Administrator' messages. They want to get out of it as quick as possible before they panic and run away.
  10. Help and Documentation - for other such times as help may be needed, make sure that help is provided in some form; though ideally a system should be self-documenting.


These are the most commonly cited heuristics in web design and interface design (at least, they are on IT degrees).

When I did my most recent dissertation, I designed a system of my own to ensure that graphical interfaces (originally of operating systems, but I'm sure that, at a stretch, they could be made to apply to a website or other application) can be as efficient and usable as possible. The points I came up with are:

  1. Simplicity and Openness - users should be made comfortable in doing what they need to do, and the system should make what can be done, what can't, and what needs attention as clear as possible.
  2. Simple Native Environment - parts of a system that serve different functions should be recognizably different; for example the main menu of a website should be different to the menu in the web browser.
  3. Easy-to-understand Graphical Widgets - graphical widgets should resemble real-world analogues and be easily recognized as meaning what they mean.
  4. Awareness of, and Friendliness toward, User Competence - yes, anything should be easy to use, but a veteran user doesn't want to be treated like a total newbie; imagine TSR being redesigned for younger users by Fisher Price.
  5. Aesthetic and Easy Elements - things should look nice and be easy on the eye.
  6. Consistency despite Evolution - an update/upgrade should not include a total change to the interface; this makes users uncomfortable.

I hope this helps.

Wow, Toots :eek3:

Thank you so maaach
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laide15
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#17
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#17
I think a good website is easy to navigate.

please people do help me complete my survey its less than 10mins.
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_Fergo
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#18
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#18
Personally, what I really find attractive in a site (which always seems to stick in my head) is a large search bar. Yes I speak the truth!

I love it when there is a large search bar and a few options around it. It makes me much more likely to search what I want within the site, without irritating me at the same time!

Posted from TSR Mobile
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