Has anyone got any good revision tips?

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Es98
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Going into year 11, has anybody out there got some valuable techniques or tips they are willing to share with us?
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TheMan100
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I find that setting myself a list of revision tasks as opposed to abiding by a timetable is better, because it allows flexibility when revising. My revision technique is to just read the relevant textbooks and make sure I understand everything; it will be much easier to remember and apply something you fully understand. If you still don't understand after reading it time and time again, Google it, it'll be worded differently elsewhere and there'll be multiple explanations as to what you may be stuck on... Or, simply ask for help on TSR or from your teacher. To help reinforce what I've just read, I usually make notes on the entire chapter/section I've just read once I've finished it, so I have to recall everything from the beginning to the end, then I'll quickly skim back through the chapter to spot what I haven't remembered and add it to my notes accordingly.

I've never bothered with flashcards as I can't be bothered to write them out, as well as notes. What I've described above usually enables me to remember everything I need to know for the exam.

With things such as maths, I tend to just do past papers and go through Solomon question worksheets.
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Strom
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I'm going into year 11 too

I recommend a revision timetable to keep track of things. Aside from that just make cue cards and notes on topics that you aren't sure on, and when exam time draws near do some past papers.
Don't overwork yourself; we have a-levels for that.
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Es98
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(Original post by TheMan100)
I find that setting myself a list of revision tasks as opposed to abiding by a timetable is better, because it allows flexibility when revising. My revision technique is to just read the relevant textbooks and make sure I understand everything; it will be much easier to remember and apply something you fully understand. If you still don't understand after reading it time and time again, Google it, it'll be worded differently elsewhere and there'll be multiple explanations as to what you may be stuck on... Or, simply ask for help on TSR or from your teacher. To help reinforce what I've just read, I usually make notes on the entire chapter/section I've just read once I've finished it, so I have to recall everything from the beginning to the end, then I'll quickly skim back through the chapter to spot what I haven't remembered and add it to my notes accordingly.

I've never bothered with flashcards as I can't be bothered to write them out, as well as notes. What I've described above usually enables me to remember everything I need to know for the exam.

With things such as maths, I tend to just do past papers and go through Solomon question worksheets.

That sounds good to me! I did my English literature GCSE a year early, so nervous for the result as I have intentions to continue to study it at A level, but I shall take that into mind with maths; It is by far my weakest subject, Thankyou !!!
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Es98
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(Original post by Strom)
I'm going into year 11 too

I recommend a revision timetable to keep track of things. Aside from that just make cue cards and notes on topics that you aren't sure on, and when exam time draws near do some past papers.
Don't overwork yourself; we have a-levels for that.
Ahh I know, so much stress 😪, what are you projected/targeted?
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Strom
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(Original post by Es98)
Ahh I know, so much stress ������, what are you projected/targeted?
5 A's the rest B's. I'm aiming for 5 A*s though >.> I want to go to Oxbridge possibly.

What about you?

EDIT: I did statistics a year early
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Es98
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(Original post by Strom)
5 A's the rest B's. I'm aiming for 5 A*s though >.> I want to go to Oxbridge possibly.

What about you?

EDIT: I did statistics a year early
I'm aiming for Oxbridge also, or Durham, at the beginning of my GCSE's I was targeted B's for everything ( our school doesn't do individual targets at first which is completely ridiculous so my ks3 maths bought it down), but now I'm projected all a*'s and a's apart from maths which has stated at a B, I really want a*s in English lit, lang, sociology, history and chemistry, good luck with your statistics result !!!
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Strom
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(Original post by Es98)
I'm aiming for Oxbridge also, or Durham, at the beginning of my GCSE's I was targeted B's for everything ( our school doesn't do individual targets at first which is completely ridiculous so my ks3 maths bought it down), but now I'm projected all a*'s and a's apart from maths which has stated at a B, I really want a*s in English lit, lang, sociology, history and chemistry, good luck with your statistics result !!!
Thanks, good luck to you too
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laylarose
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Due to extenuating circumstances, I did leave my revision a little late and began in April, about 25 days before my first exam.

For the sciences and Maths, I literally only revised using specifications and past papers and this absolutely amazing guy on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/myGCSEscience - I owe all my science grades to him.

For English and humanities, the best thing I found was to just practice essays. I didn't really do much for English, but for History I wrote notes and stuck them on my bedroom walls, so when I was getting dressed, I was revising. Helped a tonne on exam days!
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Es98
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(Original post by laylarose)
Due to extenuating circumstances, I did leave my revision a little late and began in April, about 25 days before my first exam.

For the sciences and Maths, I literally only revised using specifications and past papers and this absolutely amazing guy on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/myGCSEscience - I owe all my science grades to him.

For English and humanities, the best thing I found was to just practice essays. I didn't really do much for English, but for History I wrote notes and stuck them on my bedroom walls, so when I was getting dressed, I was revising. Helped a tonne on exam days!

I'm going to check out his vids they look good!! By humanities are you referring to them grouped together as geography, history r.e etc.. Or the individual gcse? I have to do GCSE humanities and I'm yet to come across someone whom is also doing gcse humanities who does not attend my school 😂😂
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hazzaaa123
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No point in revising untill day before the exam. Trust me it works. Even though i prob failed lmao
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laylarose
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(Original post by Es98)
I'm going to check out his vids they look good!! By humanities are you referring to them grouped together as geography, history r.e etc.. Or the individual gcse? I have to do GCSE humanities and I'm yet to come across someone whom is also doing gcse humanities who does not attend my school 😂😂
I meant them separately, yes. I've never heard of the humanity GCSE! :lol:
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Es98
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(Original post by laylarose)
I meant them separately, yes. I've never heard of the humanity GCSE! :lol:
My point exactly 😂
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HIGH AIMS 2016
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Hi did you get A or A*s? from all the revising?
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lolly786
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I would say creating a timetable, organising all your work and notes and things like flashcards. I'd also recommend revising a month or two before exams depending on the type of learner you are and whether or not you work better under pressure..
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DaisyTwilight
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You have to find what works best for you, so I'd maybe experiment with a few different techniques and see what works for you. I prefer to write everything down, and then rewrite it in the form of posters and flashcards etc. as it gets it into my head. Other people I know prefer to just read from their books, get people to test them. If you're doing a language and have to memorise a speaking test then my tip is to try and fit the words into a song that you like. When you're going about your daily business you can sing it to yourself and it'll soon be in your head. Also, if you can't remember during the exam, you can quickly wiz over the song in your head. Hope I helped!


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29Bilal96
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Yeah, just use the CGP books for Science and you're sorted.
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jonathanemptage
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Yeah take breaks where you forget about studying go watch TV or workout it gives your brain a chance to assimilate what you've just done thus making sure you can recall it

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Carts1234
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AMEN to that! Those CGP books are ace for the Sciences because they have those infantile little jokes at the bottom of each page that actually stick in yer brain!
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chrissy1579
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For maths definitely past papers, they are the best way to progress! Also our teacher gave us A Level questions also to challenge us which did help a good bit.
For subjects such as English and History I would suggest essay plans and/or essays if you have the time and colour coordinating things definitely helps (eg reference back to the question in one colour, methods/techniques in another)
Then for sciences I used flash cards for them, I only began using them at the end of year 11 but they were brilliant for shortening things down and getting only what you need! It effectively shortened my whole course


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