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    Hello ^^ |'m looking around at unis at the moment, and I intend to apply for biomed. Just wondering if any current students could give their honest opinions about the university you go to.

    Just general comments on the teaching, workload, course etc. and what it's like being a student there would be super helpful.

    Particularly curious about Newcastle, Dundee and Sussex but all advice would be great.

    Thanks ^^
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    i know a ton of people at bradford,

    get in with DDD A-Levels

    i see no negatives
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    Thanks, not quite considering Bradford though...
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    (Original post by TammyIce)
    Hello ^^ |'m looking around at unis at the moment, and I intend to apply for biomed. Just wondering if any current students could give their honest opinions about the university you go to.

    Just general comments on the teaching, workload, course etc. and what it's like being a student there would be super helpful.

    Particularly curious about Newcastle, Dundee and Sussex but all advice would be great.

    Thanks ^^
    Hello, I've just finished my degree in biomed at Lincoln. I really enjoyed my course and it opened up lots of opportunities that perhaps weren't even biomed related. Teaching wise, we had about 8 hours per week, plus about 3/4 hours of lab time on top, however some weeks it was more and others it was less.

    Workload, we had essays/lab reports every 2 weeks, so it was a fairly steady feed of practical then related assignment for submission the fortnight after.

    Practical wise, they were always really useful, in the first year, its all about getting your skills up to the same level, they understand that people will have completely different levels of practical experience. So the main aim is to get everyone to a similar place. After that it becomes more specialist and really giving you the skills to become a independent scientist. The things that I learnt in the first two years really helped me with my third year project.

    One of the really good things about lincoln was that the third year project opened up the whole school of life sciences. So as a biomed student, if you had an interest in say animal behaviour, there would be an option to do your project on that. This also really opens up options further down the line, especially if you go onto to do postgrad!

    As a student, Lincoln was/is a really good place, i'm staying on to do postgrad! Although it's a small uni, its growing really quick and there really investing in science. Everything is based on one campus which is really good and saves a fortune on buses, even the accomodation is all really close, being about 10/15 max from the campus. There's a really good night life, with pretty much something every night. There's also tonnes of sports and societies. Although I did biomed i joined the law society and know people that have done things equally completely different to their course!

    If you have any more questions, send me a message and i'll do my best to help
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    (Original post by reecehorsley)
    Hello, I've just finished my degree in biomed at Lincoln. I really enjoyed my course and it opened up lots of opportunities that perhaps weren't even biomed related. Teaching wise, we had about 8 hours per week, plus about 3/4 hours of lab time on top, however some weeks it was more and others it was less.

    Workload, we had essays/lab reports every 2 weeks, so it was a fairly steady feed of practical then related assignment for submission the fortnight after.

    Practical wise, they were always really useful, in the first year, its all about getting your skills up to the same level, they understand that people will have completely different levels of practical experience. So the main aim is to get everyone to a similar place. After that it becomes more specialist and really giving you the skills to become a independent scientist. The things that I learnt in the first two years really helped me with my third year project.

    One of the really good things about lincoln was that the third year project opened up the whole school of life sciences. So as a biomed student, if you had an interest in say animal behaviour, there would be an option to do your project on that. This also really opens up options further down the line, especially if you go onto to do postgrad!

    As a student, Lincoln was/is a really good place, i'm staying on to do postgrad! Although it's a small uni, its growing really quick and there really investing in science. Everything is based on one campus which is really good and saves a fortune on buses, even the accomodation is all really close, being about 10/15 max from the campus. There's a really good night life, with pretty much something every night. There's also tonnes of sports and societies. Although I did biomed i joined the law society and know people that have done things equally completely different to their course!

    If you have any more questions, send me a message and i'll do my best to help

    Wow, thank you very much that's really helpful. I wasn't even considering Lincoln but I might actually check out their course ^^ (I will definitely be bugging you with messages if that's alright )


    It sounds really good good luck at postgrad, thanks again
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    (Original post by TammyIce)
    Wow, thank you very much that's really helpful. I wasn't even considering Lincoln but I might actually check out their course ^^ (I will definitely be bugging you with messages if that's alright )


    It sounds really good good luck at postgrad, thanks again
    That's great to hear, glad to of been of help! I've now become the University rep on here. If you have any questions, please send them in my direction and I'll do my best to help.

    Reece
    (Student Ambassador - Undergraduate Biomedical Science, Postgraduate Marketing)
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    Posted this in the Warwick forum, but I'll copy and paste it here to give you an overview of the Warwick biomed course:

    You have your core modules, which are:
    Proteins, Genes and Genetics - lots of biochemistry/molecular biology. Protein structure, DNA replication, transcription, translation, genetics, bacterial genetics.
    Physiology and Metabolism - more biochemistry. Metabolic pathways, physiology mostly focuses on musculoskeletal and nervous system.
    Agents of Infectious Disease - virology, immunology, microbiology and lots of other fun diseases
    Cells, Tissues and Organisms - cell biology, a bit of embryology.
    Quantitative Biology - biostatistics. Universally hated module, although it's necessary. It's being changed a lot for this year, as it was new for us and didn't receive great feedback.

    Then your optionals (2 modules, 1 if you take Brain and Behaviour):
    Brain and Behaviour - run by the psychology department. Lots of psychology/neurobiology. If you take this, it's your only optional module.
    Health and the Community - similar to Agents of Infectious Disease, but more in depth on specific diseases and certain epidemics. My favourite module.
    Animal and Plant Biology - mostly animal/plant/human evolution, with a bit of extra plant stuff thrown in. I took it, since I took H&C and I didn't enjoy it for the most part.
    Environmental Biology - lots of climate type stuff. I don't know too much about it, as I didn't take it.

    Then on top of those, you have tutorial work (two graded essays, one at 1500 words, one at 3000. A group poster presentation and an individual presentation) and lab work (biochemistry, microbiology, physiology and genetics labs). Labs are once a week for about six hours. You'll have to write a lab report for each lab, which are usually around 1,500 words or so.

    I really enjoyed my first year. There's a LOT to take in, so my advice would be to study throughout the year to keep the material fresh in your mind. I left revision to a month before exams and it caused me a ton of unnecessary stress.

    The Warwick Biomedical Science degree isn't accredited by the IBMS. This means you wouldn't be able to work as a biomedical scientist in the NHS. An unaccredited course is preferred if you're planning further study after your undergraduate degree (Masters, PhD, Medicine) as it always far more flexibility in your modules. With an IBMS accredited degree, you have to complete modules according to their guidelines. You should really consider whether you want to apply for an IBMS accredited course or an unaccredited one.
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    Nearly all unis have biomed in clearing, is it not popular?
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    (Original post by tallica79)
    Nearly all unis have biomed in clearing, is it not popular?
    It's definitely a popular course, especially as a lot of people that don't make it into medicine choose to study biomed in order to progress into graduate entry medicine. It has a large intake at my uni, at least.
 
 
 

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