Self Defence question

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Tomsta
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I know this is the most clichéd question in all of martial arts, but i'm trying to find a self defence system / martial art that could be effectively used in your average fight in a bar or street

I've had 2 years of Aikido training and although i can see the benefits of it i notice a rather fatal flaw in the system, it requires both parties to have knowledge of the martial art for it to be used effectively, now of course this is very unlikley to occur, so i've stopped doing Aikido for a while, i still use some of the basic hip movements and basic blocks/grapples etc.

What i'm looking for is a style that can be used one a opponent who as no training in any form of fighting (as that's what the majority of people on the street are)

Based on my research i've narrowed it down to the following three

Krav Maga
Boxing
Wing Chun

If anyone has any expierance in these please share your thoughts
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Greg Jackson
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boxing & bjj
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SEHughes
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If you can't afford BJJ, you can definitely afford judo.

Mick Coup also suggests rugby. The conditioning demands have significant carryover to dealing with getting knocked about by big, aggressive blokes and battling through it. Bit more social than most martial arts too, and let's be honest, more likely to get you laid.
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Tomsta
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(Original post by SEHughes)
If you can't afford BJJ, you can definitely afford judo.

Mick Coup also suggests rugby. The conditioning demands have significant carryover to dealing with getting knocked about by big, aggressive blokes and battling through it. Bit more social than most martial arts too, and let's be honest, more likely to get you laid.
i HATE rugby and tbh me getting laid isn't a priority of mine, i'm not build to be a rugby player and tbh the girls that would consider sleeping with me JUST because i do rugby aren't the girls i want to know
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omid123
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Boxing mate...The best self defence
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iEatMuFFiNS
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1. Kickboxing
2. Boxing
3. Wrestling

Basically, what MMA fighters mostly have. Of course they have other things like Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, but i wouldn't recommend in a real street fight where you don't want to leave yourself exposed.
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omid123
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(Original post by iEatMuFFiNS)
1. Kickboxing
2. Boxing
3. Wrestling

Basically, what MMA fighters mostly have. Of course they have other things like Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, but i wouldn't recommend in a real street fight where you don't want to leave yourself exposed.
depends how many people mate if it is one on one you just RNC them.
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Ornlu
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Sistema - Self defence and combat technique developed for Spetnaz and the other Russian special forces. A hand to hand combat situation in a battle may be somewhat similar to a bar fight, so I think there is promise in terms of its application in everyday life
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unusual suspect
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I'd just like to point out that, while I get this is a hypothetical situation, the best defense is not getting in a fight by running or just avoiding the situation all together.
The thing is if you need to fight the chances are you'll forget any martial arts unless you've been doing it for a very long time. I like the traditional martial arts, mostly because that's what I do. But I think the best on that list is Boxing as its a bit more short term. Plus, don't worry about sociable because in my experience its still social.
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UncleFisty
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The answer to this question is no longer a mystery. Literally the only thing that you need to do is watch how mixed martial arts has developed over the last twenty years and you have the purest example of what fighting styles work. Thousands of fights over two decades provides a pretty damn scientific answer. Primarily you need to know how to grapple. Without this knowledge there's a big chance that any striking skills will be rendered useless as soon as some thug grabs hold of you or your clothes. So if you want my advice, get a solid background in BJJ or submission wrestling. The fact that you are able to spar 100% every time that you train without getting hurt means that you will remember your training under stress. The importance of this cannot be overstated. The reason that arts like wing chun, aikido and Krav Maga do not have a history of being effective in live fighting is that they are not generally practiced in a live setting. It's simply not possible to remember how to fight if you haven't done any fighting. I've had experience in wing chun, systema and many of the arts mentioned on this thread, and the truth is they they simply don't work. Please take my word on this, take BJJ for a couple of months (multiple times weekly, this will get you MUCH faster results) and if you still do not feel confident, then try supplementing with some striking training, in boxing or kickboxing (ideally Muay Thai). The problem with these arts is that full sparring is very demanding, and it will take a lot of experience to become confident enough to throw meaningful strikes in a self defence situation. I have trained and competed in Muay Thai for three years and BJJ for just one, yet I feel that if I was attacked I would defer immediately to my grappling.

Please trust me on this, BJJ is the way to go if you want to get the most out of your time. I promise that you will very quickly find yourself becoming obsessed. The art also has a reputation for friendliness and playfulness, so you'll have **** loads of fun and learn how to defend yourself in the most effective way all while never taking a single punch to the face. Does it almost sounds too good to be true? That's what I thought. It took me years for one of my BJJ friends to convince me to start grappling, but I've never looked back.

Start your journey man, you will not regret it. See you on the mats.
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UncleFisty
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(Original post by Ornlu)
Sistema - Self defence and combat technique developed for Spetnaz and the other Russian special forces. A hand to hand combat situation in a battle may be somewhat similar to a bar fight, so I think there is promise in terms of its application in everyday life
I trained in this for around six months. There's some kinda cool elements but I'd say it's 81% bull****
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omid123
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(Original post by UncleFisty)
The answer to this question is no longer a mystery. Literally the only thing that you need to do is watch how mixed martial arts has developed over the last twenty years and you have the purest example of what fighting styles work. Thousands of fights over two decades provides a pretty damn scientific answer. Primarily you need to know how to grapple. Without this knowledge there's a big chance that any striking skills will be rendered useless as soon as some thug grabs hold of you or your clothes. So if you want my advice, get a solid background in BJJ or submission wrestling. The fact that you are able to spar 100% every time that you train without getting hurt means that you will remember your training under stress. The importance of this cannot be overstated. The reason that arts like wing chun, aikido and Krav Maga do not have a history of being effective in live fighting is that they are not generally practiced in a live setting. It's simply not possible to remember how to fight if you haven't done any fighting. I've had experience in wing chun, systema and many of the arts mentioned on this thread, and the truth is they they simply don't work. Please take my word on this, take BJJ for a couple of months (multiple times weekly, this will get you MUCH faster results) and if you still do not feel confident, then try supplementing with some striking training, in boxing or kickboxing (ideally Muay Thai). The problem with these arts is that full sparring is very demanding, and it will take a lot of experience to become confident enough to throw meaningful strikes in a self defence situation. I have trained and competed in Muay Thai for three years and BJJ for just one, yet I feel that if I was attacked I would defer immediately to my grappling.

Please trust me on this, BJJ is the way to go if you want to get the most out of your time. I promise that you will very quickly find yourself becoming obsessed. The art also has a reputation for friendliness and playfulness, so you'll have **** loads of fun and learn how to defend yourself in the most effective way all while never taking a single punch to the face. Does it almost sounds too good to be true? That's what I thought. It took me years for one of my BJJ friends to convince me to start grappling, but I've never looked back.

Start your journey man, you will not regret it. See you on the mats.
Yes BJJ is the best martial art to learn. What belt are you man?
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UncleFisty
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(Original post by omid123)
Yes BJJ is the best martial art to learn. What belt are you man?
Despite all my raving about BJJ, I'm still a white belt, 4 stripes.
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omid123
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(Original post by UncleFisty)
Despite all my raving about BJJ, I'm still a white belt, 4 stripes.
Oh thats cool, you done any competitions yet who is your trainer?
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UncleFisty
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(Original post by omid123)
Oh thats cool, you done any competitions yet who is your trainer?
Just once at the Nottingham Open last year, I got dominated but it was only about 8 weeks after I started BJJ so I didn't take it personally. I train under a guy called Luiz Salles, who has ties with Nova Uniao in Rio.
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omid123
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(Original post by UncleFisty)
Just once at the Nottingham Open last year, I got dominated but it was only about 8 weeks after I started BJJ so I didn't take it personally. I train under a guy called Luiz Salles, who has ties with Nova Uniao in Rio.
Thats really cool, I am borderline blue belt and my team is ICON BJJ
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UncleFisty
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(Original post by omid123)
Thats really cool, I am borderline blue belt and my team is ICON BJJ
A boarderline blue belt sounds a lot like a white belt to me! Haha
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omid123
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(Original post by UncleFisty)
A boarderline blue belt sounds a lot like a white belt to me! Haha
Haahaha yes i am a white belt, Are you going uni this year too?
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UncleFisty
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(Original post by omid123)
Haahaha yes i am a white belt, Are you going uni this year too?
Sort of, did first year last year at leeds, but I've changed courses which means I get to do first year again which is awesome.
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goldenfish
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Jeet kune Do is probably the best fighting art to learn.
Teaches you to not commit yourself to any one form e.g. Boxing stances / wing chun stance(s) but rather learn many different forms to be able to counter whatever your opponent uses effectively.
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