ChocInABox
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
you're degree choice

why/why not

which degree are you doing
0
reply
forborall
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#2
Report 6 years ago
#2
I don't regret anything.
0
reply
Democracy
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report 6 years ago
#3
Medicine and no, not even a little. It has its occasional low points, but they're not enough for me to seriously regret choosing it.
0
reply
forborall
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#4
Report 6 years ago
#4
Even if you regret your degree, it's not all hopeless.

You can transfer skills to another job. This is what I am doing at the moment.
0
reply
Ruffiio
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#5
Report 6 years ago
#5
I don't regret my degree, but kind of regret not applying to different degrees, when I was in college I had my mind dead set on studying History and Politics at university, on the other hand, I'm an absolute lover for learning new languages and it's always been my dream job to be an interpreter so I kind of wish I had applied for a degree in modern languages, after all, in most cases you need a degree in order to progress to that route unless you've spend considerable time in a foreign country immersing yourself in the culture and language etc. Whether I would have taken it is another matter altogether because I also love history and politics. Ideally I would have liked to apply for a German and history course but what really annoys me is that most universities require the applicant to have some prior knowledge of the language to be studied such as in GCSE or A level and in some cases they demand a certain grade but not always. Not only this, but they most if not all universities don't have a foundation level entry for people without the stated entry requirements (such as people applying to a language degree who have never studied the language before or at a very basic level). It's flawed from the very beginning and cuts people off from studying foreign languages, I've always wanted to study German at an educational institution whether it be high school, sixth form college or university but it goes like this: My highschool never did German GCSE > My sixth form college never did German A level (and even if they did I would have been rejected anyway because I applied for Spanish at my sixth form college with a GCSE grade (C) but they rejected me because I needed a GCSE grade (B) minimum. Because I never studied German at either GCSE or A level i'm cut off from studying it at university (in most cases, some universities do offer the ability to study at beginners level but these universities were half way round the country from my home and I wasn't prepared to move so far)

Luckily I made a (somewhat) compromise, maybe even a better compromise, I took a German language beginners course at my university and at the end of the year I was awarded a certificate of higher education at distinction level. Therefore in other words, not only was I studying 2 subjects that I love (History and Politics) I also studied another subject that I loved too, German, so i'm getting the best of both worlds as opposed to had I just chosen history and German excluding politics. And since technically a certificate of higher education is equivalent to the first year of university apparently, I'm not sure about how valuable it is in employ-ability situations but I guess that means I kind of did 2 1'st year of universities in one year? :dontknow:
But yeah, modern languages are a high demand subject when it comes to teaching I think, and if i'm not mistaken the government wants more youngsters to learn foreign languages from a young age, and these type of situations cut people off from achieving it. No one expects an English student to study a language such as Russian, Polish, Chinese, Korean, Japanese etc at A level or GCSE level because most of the time the most common languages taught in England are French and Spanish. So if they allow people to start from abinito level on languages like Japanese, Chinese etc, then why not for the commonly taught languages too?
0
reply
rockrunride
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#6
Report 6 years ago
#6
No not at all. It was one of my oldest dreams to become fluent in a foreign language.
0
reply
Origami Bullets
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#7
Report 6 years ago
#7
Politics

Don't regret it at all - I really enjoyed studying it, and came out with a good job at the end of it.
0
reply
Blackacre
Badges: 12
#8
Report 6 years ago
#8
(Original post by Origami Bullets)
Politics

Don't regret it at all - I really enjoyed studying it, and came out with a good job at the end of it.
Ditto the above, except I studied Law. :cool:
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Current uni students - are you thinking of dropping out of university?

Yes, I'm seriously considering dropping out (22)
17.19%
I'm not sure (3)
2.34%
No, I'm going to stick it out for now (42)
32.81%
I have already dropped out (3)
2.34%
I'm not a current university student (58)
45.31%

Watched Threads

View All