mikeski
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#1
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how smart would you have to be to study this at a Uni? just a wee question :p:
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Intelligentsia
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UCL electronics/electrical engineering dept are offering a 4 year undergraduate in nanotechnology. It's something that caught my fancy too, but I it's really something you would study at postrgraduate/research level. It's quite a hushed field.
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mikeski
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yea, it sounds rly interesting to me too. i would love to find out more about it :p:
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HighlyEvolved
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supposedly i dont have good enough eyesight
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mikeski
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haa....................... na :rolleyes:
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HighlyEvolved
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sorry
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mikeski
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:p:
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afire_insideme
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about this smart <------------------------------------------>
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mikeski
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not even this smart: <------------------------------------------------> ??
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ChemistBoy
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Don't bother - do a core subject such as chemistry, physics or engineering. Nanotech is still an incredibly high-tech field and you aren't going to get anywhere without a PhD anyway, so why restrict yourself to doing something which will leave you without many job options as a graduate.

btw, I'm actually working in nanotech at the moment.
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Darxy
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I don't know if i agree with the PhD thing really, depends on where you do want to do. Leeds has a new nanotechnology degree, i have a friend in the department and people are being plucked straight up from there by the MoD and pharmaceuticals companies etc. Its a fairly vocational course though!
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ChemistBoy
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(Original post by Darxy)
I don't know if i agree with the PhD thing really, depends on where you do want to do. Leeds has a new nanotechnology degree, i have a friend in the department and people are being plucked straight up from there by the MoD and pharmaceuticals companies etc. Its a fairly vocational course though!
To be fair, the MOD usually want you to do a part-time research studentship on one of their projects - this is why they are so keen to get first degree graduates and build up their expertise 'in-house'. Pharmaceuticals companies and the ilk - look at all the guys in the top scientific jobs - all have PhDs - if you want to go into business then having just a degree is fine (and nanotech is no better than chemistry in that regard), but to stay in science you really need a PhD. Nanotech is a multidiscipliniary subject and personally I think you should have a good grounding in a single discipline as you are likely to make much more of a contribution than a jack of all trades. Trying to stay in science with just a first degree generally means staying in the lab which is usually poorly paid.
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Darxy
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(Original post by ChemistBoy)
To be fair, the MOD usually want you to do a part-time research studentship on one of their projects - this is why they are so keen to get first degree graduates and build up their expertise 'in-house'. Pharmaceuticals companies and the ilk - look at all the guys in the top scientific jobs - all have PhDs - if you want to go into business then having just a degree is fine (and nanotech is no better than chemistry in that regard), but to stay in science you really need a PhD. Nanotech is a multidiscipliniary subject and personally I think you should have a good grounding in a single discipline as you are likely to make much more of a contribution than a jack of all trades. Trying to stay in science with just a first degree generally means staying in the lab which is usually poorly paid.
Aye, when you explain it like that i can't help but agree :p: I decided against the course a while back anyway, but it was a consideration. Having said that, theres no harm in taking a course such as physics with nanotechnology. At least then you aren't specialising too much!
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ChemistBoy
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(Original post by Darxy)
Aye, when you explain it like that i can't help but agree :p: I decided against the course a while back anyway, but it was a consideration. Having said that, theres no harm in taking a course such as physics with nanotechnology. At least then you aren't specialising too much!
Taking a 'with' course is usually pretty sound as they are generally the standard degree with a few modules about the specialism. Any chemistry or physics graduate should, however, have the basic skills to go into nanotech so I think the specialism at undergraduate level is a bit strange to be honest. I supposed I should be lending my support for such degrees as nanotech as they encourage more people into the study of the fundamental physical sciences - I just don't want to people to be fooled that doing a nanotech degree is a) a better route into the area, b) a way of getting into the area without studying the "boring" traditional disciplines. Nanotech is built on solid state physics and surface chemistry and you can't avoid the high level study of those two if you are to be successful.
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