Quantum Confinement
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How does the current know which way to split at a junction in a circuit?

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Joinedup
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(Original post by dantitch)
How does the current know which way to split at a junction in a circuit?

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That's rather vague.

current is a rate of flow (of charged particles)
voltage is a force

R=V/I

which means resistance of a component is the amount of volts required to force a particular rate of flow through it.

parallel components have the same voltage across them.
so if you had a 10ohm and 20ohm resistors in parallel, the current forced through the 10ohm ohm would be twice the current forced through the 20 ohm
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Desk-Lamp
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(Original post by Joinedup)
parallel components have the same voltage across them.
so if you had a 10ohm and 20ohm resistors in parallel, the current forced through the 10ohm ohm would be twice the current forced through the 20 ohm
Ah yes, but how does the current know? Do the electrons use telepathy to detect which path has more resistance before deciding which path to take? :dontknow:
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(Original post by Desk-Lamp)
Ah yes, but how does the current know? Do the electrons use telepathy to detect which path has more resistance before deciding which path to take? :dontknow:
right, for metal wires and similar you can perhaps think of it as being ram packed with electrons. Perhaps like a pipe full of snooker balls, they can only shuffle forward when there's a space in front of them.

electrons can only turn into a branch at the same rate the electrons already in the branch are getting out of the other end.

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Quantum Confinement
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(Original post by Joinedup)
right, for metal wires and similar you can perhaps think of it as being ram packed with electrons. Perhaps like a pipe full of snooker balls, they can only shuffle forward when there's a space in front of them.

electrons can only turn into a branch at the same rate the electrons already in the branch are getting out of the other end.

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Sound pretty much like what I've managed to understand from the rest of the internet, thanks
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