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I discriminate women based on their looks Watch

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    As part of my job in PR, I have to recruit PR/marketing people.

    Often if I have equally matched candidates, that are female, I have a preference for the more attractive female. As I feel that they will get more clients on board.

    I feel bad for doing this, should I?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    As part of my job in PR, I have to recruit PR/marketing people.

    Often if I have equally matched candidates, that are female, I have a preference for the more attractive female. As I feel that they will get more clients on board.

    I feel bad for doing this, should I?

    No.
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    You really have to ask us if you should feel bad about something?

    Do you have no moral compass of your own?
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    There is an ethical side to your situation but it's part of what your job entails.
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    You should feel bad. But unfortunately, this is a common occurrence in the corporate world.
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    (Original post by Steezy)
    You really have to ask us if you should feel bad about something?

    Do you have no moral compass of your own?
    It feels unethical. Often when I am interviewing women, I am judging them based on their looks.

    Say I have 10 girls to pick from, all equally matched,I start becoming ultra picky. Even if one has a slightly better personality than the other, I choose the hotter one, as she will be the face of our firm and is likely to close more deals.
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    If they're equally matched and one's better looking, I think it's fair.
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    0/10, too obvious

    The lack of grammar in the thread title/post makes me think OP doesn't have a job anywhere TBH.
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    If they are equally matched, there has to be some method of making the decision. "Equally matched" here I do hope means "every aspect that matters to the job is equal", and in such a case, any method of deciding between the two is arbitrary; there is no natural or better choice.

    The choice that makes the office a nicer looking place is as good as any.
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    (Original post by Swirll)
    0/10, too obvious

    The lack of grammar in the thread title/post makes me think OP doesn't have a job anywhere TBH.
    lol, I wonder if you were one of the candidates that I rejected.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    lol, I wonder if you were one of the candidates that I rejected.
    Never applied for a job in my life, u mad? :smug:

    Also, stop feeding it, guys. Obvious troll is obvious.
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    (Original post by Swirll)
    Never applied for a job in my life, u mad? :smug:

    Also, stop feeding it, guys. Obvious troll is obvious.
    Fair play. If that is what you want to think, by that, me being a troll. You will have a rude awakening, if you do decide to pursue a career in PR and Marketing.

    I clearly have touched a nerve.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Fair play. If that is what you want to think, by that, me being a troll. You will have a rude awakening, if you do decide to pursue a career in PR and Marketing.

    I clearly have touched a nerve.
    Lmfao. You're clearly very upset at being called out, calm down. I remember when trolls used to display a bit of wit and intelligence, as is always necessary for fooling people.

    These days, they're all scraping the bottom of the barrel and begging for it. C'mon, be more entertaining! :lol:
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    (Original post by Swirll)
    Lmfao. You're clearly very upset at being called out, calm down. I remember when trolls used to display a bit of wit and intelligence, as is always necessary for fooling people.

    These days, they're all scraping the bottom of the barrel and begging for it. C'mon, be more entertaining! :lol:
    What are you on about?

    I am not upset at all. You need to stop making assumptions, it will get you into trouble within the professional environment.

    I started this thread because I feel slightly bad for discriminating this way.
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    I think it's wrong what you do and that you should change your practice. The less attractive candidate could still create a great rapport with clients and since they are equally qualified can also do the job well. She has no control over how she looks, so of course what you are practicing is discrimination. Perhaps try rotating the process and hiring equally between the less attractive and more to balance it out or perhaps add a further screening test to your hiring process where they can display their skills in practice. I wonder though since you are discriminating based on how good one looks, have you also been discriminating based on skin colour/race ?

    It's quite obvious you probably are but instead of assuming I will put the question to you and give you a fair chance at defending yourself. The fact you are questioning yourself is good though whether you decide to actually change will be completely up to you.

    Considering some poster questioning whether you are a troll, it's possible but I don't really care, the question posed and answers given can still help change others behaviour for the better.
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    Good looks and social graces are marketable qualities like any other. They're just as important if not more so than UCAS points or degrees.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    What are you on about?

    I am not upset at all. You need to stop making assumptions, it will get you into trouble within the professional environment.

    I started this thread because I feel slightly bad for discriminating in this way.
    As evidenced by almost every single post you've made on this thread, you can't use proper grammar to save your life, you write like a 15-year-old, and you're seriously asking why people are questioning why you say you're in the position to hire others?

    Your whole tone screams troll. Unlike you, I actually already work for a living and know how people in the corporate environment act. You are so obviously making stuff up and trying to get a reaction out of people that, quite frankly, it's hilariously pathetic.

    Get a life :lol: Do something better than wasting your time making threads like these on TSR.
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    This is no worse than Hollister/A&F discriminating based on looks in terms of who they hire (both men and women).
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    As part of my job in PR, I have to recruit PR/marketing people.

    Often if I have equally matched candidates, that are female, I have a preference for the more attractive female. As I feel that they will get more clients on board.

    I feel bad for doing this, should I?
    You don't need to feel guilty, but then no-one ever "needs" to feel guilty - it just happens. And if you think they will get more clients, then it's just corporate good business to pick them - you have a good reason that serves your company, beyond just wanting to spend time with good-looking women (which only serves yourself and might thus be a cause for more guilt, since when it comes to hiring for your company, you're probably thinking about how to maximize the company's profits).

    (Original post by FireGarden)
    If they are equally matched, there has to be some method of making the decision. "Equally matched" here I do hope means "every aspect that matters to the job is equal", and in such a case, any method of deciding between the two is arbitrary; there is no natural or better choice.

    The choice that makes the office a nicer looking place is as good as any.
    Ok but let's make the question more precise - is it fair that the OP base the offer purely on his projected opinion of how many clients the employee would bring in, or should he be expected to park the "subjective" elements of that assessment (such as looks) to the side and make the judgement purely based on the objective results and other paper-based aspects of the application (which give a basic overview of what the candidate is bringing in, but does not factor those subjective bits and pieces, which the OP thinks he can use to tell who will ultimately serve him better)?
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    If I were hiring workers for a role on the front-line with customers I would hire the best looking people (I would also hire men who are very handsome), I would not feel bad about it either, being good-looking is just another credential in my mind. In the same way, if I were hiring for a role which required heavy-lifting, I would pick the people who looked to have the strongest bodies, don't see why this is even supposed to be controversial.
 
 
 
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