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I have posted so many threads for the same question, please someone help me! Watch

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    Does a comma splice only occur while joining two independent clauses?

    Like this:

    1)I went to the shops, I got myself a new bag.

    Can a comma splice still occur in a sentence with three or more clauses, like
    this?

    2) Many businesses will require new and improved equipment, to enable that every task is carried out finer, considering this will only be an advantage to the businesses' overall performance.

    3) Although many people prefer smoking, some people disagree with smoking as it's a huge, life-threatening risk, avoiding cigarettes may be beneficial for many.

    This is how I would use a comma with three clauses in one sentence . Let me know if there is an error of my comma usage.

    When I have three or more linked thoughts in a sentence I do get confused while using a comma, and whether I have to put a coordinating conjunction and comma after every though that comes to mind.
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    In sentences with more than two clauses, a comma may be used as you mentioned. However, a " ; " can be a better choice in this case. e.g.
    Although many people prefer smoking, some people disagree with smoking as it's a huge, life-threatening risk; avoiding cigarettes may be beneficial for many.
    OR
    Many businesses will require new and improved equipment to enable that every task is carried out finer; considering this will only be an advantage to the businesses' overall performance.
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    (Original post by writeperfekt)
    In sentences with more than two clauses, a comma may be used as you mentioned. However, a " ; " can be a better choice in this case. e.g.
    Although many people prefer smoking, some people disagree with smoking as it's a huge, life-threatening risk; avoiding cigarettes may be beneficial for many.
    OR
    Many businesses will require new and improved equipment to enable that every task is carried out finer; considering this will only be an advantage to the businesses' overall performance.
    Thank you for your reply. At last some one has answered my question!
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    In sentences with more than two clauses, a comma may be used as you mentioned. However, a
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    (Original post by writeperfekt)
    In sentences with more than two clauses, a comma may be used as you mentioned. However, a " ; " can be a better choice in this case. e.g.
    Although many people prefer smoking, some people disagree with smoking as it's a huge, life-threatening risk; avoiding cigarettes may be beneficial for many.
    OR
    Many businesses will require new and improved equipment to enable that every task is carried out finer; considering this will only be an advantage to the businesses' overall performance.
    What about this:
    Many businesses will require new and improved equipment, to enable that every task is carried out finer; considering this will only be an advantage to the businesses' overall performance.

    ?

    But where my first two examples incorrect, or were they also useable?
    Sorry for asking a lot of questions
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    (Original post by Highfiveyou)
    What about this:
    Many businesses will require new and improved equipment, to enable that every task is carried out finer; considering this will only be an advantage to the businesses' overall performance.

    ?

    But where my first two examples incorrect, or where they also useable?
    Sorry for asking a lot of questions

    In my opinion, no comma should be used between 'equipment' and 'to enable' . However a " ; " serves the purpose as it is used here.
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    it appears that your sentences were grammatically correct; however, the use of comma was inappropriate.

    Check this and you'll love the idea of using " ; "

    http://theoatmeal.com/comics/semicolon
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    (Original post by writeperfekt)
    In my opinion, no comma should be used between 'equipment' and 'to enable' . However a " ; " serves the purpose as it is used here.
    Okay, thank you! Were the first two examples, I first put up also incorrect? I see in some texts when there are three different clauses/thoughts a comma is used, like this:

    The book, that I had read previously, was very much boring and time consuming.

    The police man, as a man of respect, should not act I inappropriately under any circumstances.

    Is this also a correct way?

    Thank you once again
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    (Original post by Highfiveyou)
    Okay, thank you! Were the first two examples, I first put up also incorrect? I see in some texts when there are three different clauses/thoughts a comma is used, like this:

    The book, that I had read previously, was very much boring and time consuming.

    The police man, as a man of respect, should not act I inappropriately under any circumstances.

    Is this also a correct way?

    Thank you once again
    As a matter of fact, using multiple commas is not incorrect (as you used in these sentences). The only thing is to choose a comma or a semicolon, correctly.
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    (Original post by writeperfekt)
    As a matter of fact, using multiple commas is not incorrect (as you used in these sentences). The only thing is to choose a comma or a semicolon, correctly.
    Sorry I don't understand what you mean. So was my use correct? Your message has me puzzled, sorry.

    I'm referring to the first two sentence examples I first put up on this thread.
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    (Original post by Highfiveyou)
    Sorry I don't understand what you mean. So was my use correct? Your message has me puzzled, sorry.

    I'm referring to the first two sentence examples I first put up on this thread.
    I think your use was incorrect. I sent the corrected ones in my first message. However, you can take a second opinion to be certain.
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    (Original post by writeperfekt)
    I think your use was incorrect. I sent the corrected ones in my first message. However, you can take a second opinion to be certain.
    Okay that's great. Thank you for your help!!
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    (Original post by Highfiveyou)
    Okay that's great. Thank you for your help!!
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