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    Does a comma splice only occur while joining two independent clauses?

    Like this:

    1)I went to the shops, I got myself a new bag.

    Can a comma splice still occur in a sentence with three or more clauses, like
    this?

    2) Many businesses will require new and improved equipment, to enable that every task is carried out finer, considering this will only be an advantage to the businesses' overall performance.

    3) Although many people prefer smoking, some people disagree with smoking as it's a huge, life-threatening risk, avoiding cigarettes may be beneficial for many.

    This is how I would use a comma with three clauses in one sentence . Let me know if there is an error of my comma usage.

    When I have three or more linked thoughts in a sentence I do get confused while using a comma, and whether I have to put a coordinating conjunction and comma after every though that comes to mind.
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    If you use more than one comma it becomes an inserted clause or something like that. Basically you have to make sure that the sentence makes sense if you took the part between the two commas out.

    So something like; If you're taking Chemistry A-level, which is something I would recommend, you have to be prepared to work hard.

    The clause on it's own doesn't make sense but the sentence both with and without the clause do.

    I think this is the case. Anyone else more aware it's been a few years. :L

    Hope that helps.


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    (Original post by WishfulDesire)
    If you use more than one comma it becomes an inserted clause or something like that. Basically you have to make sure that the sentence makes sense if you took the part between the two commas out.

    So something like; If you're taking Chemistry A-level, which is something I would recommend, you have to be prepared to work hard.

    The clause on it's own doesn't make sense but the sentence both with and without the clause do.

    I think this is the case. Anyone else more aware it's been a few years. :L

    Hope that helps.


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    Would you think my examples are correct then? The way I used commas in my first post? In both sentences. If you don't mind me asking, are you a student?
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    I'm a Year 13. But I'm also an amateur writer.

    Example two doesn't sound right to me. But if you removed the comma from before 'life threatening' then example three would be fine.


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    (Original post by WishfulDesire)
    I'm a Year 13. But I'm also an amateur writer.

    Example two doesn't sound right to me. But if you removed the comma from before 'life threatening' then example three would be fine.


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    Are you studying english as A-levels? If so have you used this method? I just need to know whether it's 100% accurate as I've been using this method too, but some say it's incorrect.
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    Example two doesn't sound right to me either. The comma after equipment is unnecessary so it would become:

    "2) Many businesses will require new and improved equipment to enable that every task is carried out finer, considering this will only be an advantage to the businesses' overall performance."

    The other comma in there looks out of place for me too though I can see how it would be used there.

    Edit: semi-colon works better!
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    (Original post by Mochassassin)
    Example two doesn't sound right to me either. The comma after equipment is unnecessary so it would become:

    "2) Many businesses will require new and improved equipment to enable that every task is carried out finer, considering this will only be an advantage to the businesses' overall performance."

    The other comma in there looks out of place for me too though I can see how it would be used there.
    Would that not be a coma splice will it be more suitable to place a ";" in between finer and considering?
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    (Original post by Highfiveyou)
    Would that not be a coma splice will it be more suitable to place a ";" in between finer and considering?
    Yes, a semi-colon would be perfect there.
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    (Original post by Mochassassin)
    Yes, a semi-colon would be perfect there.
    I'm just so confused about commas in three or more thoughts in the same sentence. Would you recommend any methods? Where I could apply a comma in three or more clauses?
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    (Original post by Highfiveyou)
    I'm just so confused about commas in three or more thoughts in the same sentence. Would you recommend any methods? Where I could apply a comma in three or more clauses?
    The example the other person on this thread used sounds perfectly fine: "If you're taking Chemistry A-level, which is something I would recommend, you have to be prepared to work hard."

    Wait, do you mean a sentence where you'd have to use more than two commas? :confused:
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    Sorting out things like this by trying to follow several exact rules is usually very hard in English. It's much better to read widely and look for examples and then copy the style used there. This is how I would write the sentences you've given:

    2) Many businesses will require new and improved equipment to enable every task to carried out better, which will only be of advantage to the businesses' overall performance.

    3) Although many people prefer smoking, some people disagree since it presents a huge, life-threatening risk; avoiding cigarettes may be beneficial for many.


    If in doubt, read the sentence out loud - does it sound right? A lot of the time if you find yourself confused about whether it's quite right it's better to re-write the sentence to avoid any ambiguity.

    Semi-colons ( are used for when two statements are related and you want a brief pause, or when you have lots of commas and don't want the sentence to become confusing.

    English is tricky stuff!

    xxx
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    (Original post by Highfiveyou)
    I'm just so confused about commas in three or more thoughts in the same sentence. Would you recommend any methods? Where I could apply a comma in three or more clauses?
    You probably wouldn't link three different thoughts in a single sentence like that - you'd either add the final one using a semi-colon or start a new sentence (you don't want too much information in one sentence!).

    xxx
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    (Original post by Mochassassin)
    The example the other person on this thread used sounds perfectly fine: "If you're taking Chemistry A-level, which is something I would recommend, you have to be prepared to work hard."

    Wait, do you mean a sentence where you'd have to use more than two commas? :confused:
    Just the two commas. Thank you!
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    (Original post by kpwxx)
    You probably wouldn't link three different thoughts in a single sentence like that - you'd either add the final one using a semi-colon or start a new sentence (you don't want too much information in one sentence!).

    xxx
    Thank you!
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    (Original post by Highfiveyou)
    Just the two commas. Thank you!
    Ah, then you have the perfect example already there! After two commas, you shouldn't add anymore. Just go for the semi-colon. The other poster after me explained it better.
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    (Original post by Mochassassin)
    Ah, then you have the perfect example already there! After two commas, you shouldn't add anymore. Just go for the semi-colon. The other poster after me explained it better.
    Lol thanks dude!
 
 
 
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