Advice on taking French as an A level

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Ellabest18
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In the upcoming school year i am wanting to take French as an A level. I am hoping for an A in GCSE and i was just wondering if anybody had any advice at all in the jump from GCSE to A level and if you recommend any books at all to help with getting through the exams.
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bluebeetle
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There's a book called Mot À Mot that I used for A-level which was a really handy phrasebook and covers a lot of A-level topics as well as some others. Some schools provide it as a school book, others don't, so check before buying if you plan to.
I think A-level is fine if you do a bit of revision every night all year. Over the rest of the summer, it would be a good idea to practise speaking in different tenses without having to pause to conjugate. Watch a few french movies too, if you can, but don't worry too much. Lots of people will start the A-level having done no French over summer and so will be a little rusty at first.
Good luck!


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Ellabest18
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[QUOTE=bluebeetle;49442499]There's a book called Mot À Mot that I used for A-level which was a really handy phrasebook and covers a lot of A-level topics as well as some others. Some schools provide it as a school book, others don't, so check before buying if you plan to.
I think A-level is fine if you do a bit of revision every night all year. Over the rest of the summer, it would be a good idea to practise speaking in different tenses without having to pause to conjugate. Watch a few french movies too, if you can, but don't worry too much. Lots of people will start the A-level having done no French over summer and so will be a little rusty at first.
Good luck!


Thankyou, this will help me a lot!
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Toriar
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I started the year not even being able to form the present tense (I'm being serious, I relied on google translate for pretty much everything at GCSE) and through a whole lot of hard work I can do most tenses off the top of my head now. There is a fairly big jump, especially in speaking as you can no longer just memorise a page of text, but at my college we spent most of the first term going over the basics in grammar which was very useful. What I found really helped was using Quizlet to test myself on tenses and vocabulary, which in turn improved my reading, writing, listening and speaking skills as I was able to form more complicated sentences and understand more words. In fact, here is the link to my quizlet account in case you want to try it: http://quizlet.com/ToriaM34/folders/french

If you scroll down to the bottom you should see some labelled 'grammar' which might be more useful to you at this stage than the vocabulary.

Oh btw, I'd also recommend bringing a mini French dictionary with you to school/college and using that rather than online translators. It forces you to conjugate the words yourself.
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Komodo dragon
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(Original post by Ellabest18)
In the upcoming school year i am wanting to take French as an A level. I am hoping for an A in GCSE and i was just wondering if anybody had any advice at all in the jump from GCSE to A level and if you recommend any books at all to help with getting through the exams.
There is a jump, yes, but it is certainly doable! I would recommend learning your tenses and basic grammar really well, as this forms the basis of the whole french language, and is something that you need to learn. Also don't be put off if you find it tricky at first. My essays always came back covered in red pen, which was disheartening, but it's scary how quickly you improve. I would also recommend the mot a mot book, but would wait until you start lessons to ask your teacher if you need to buy any other books. Good luck!
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Ellabest18
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Thankyou everybody, i'm feeling a bit more confident now!
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SecretDuck
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Also, exposing yourself to the language, at least a little bit every day will help wonders.
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