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    (Original post by TolerantBeing)
    I'm sure we'll all seen and been a part of the discussion following the news of Robin Williams death. And one thing it has done is to have brought to surface the continued debates regarding mental illness, depression and suicide.

    My homepage has been flooded with various articles, and I've got to be honest, I haven't read them, they all say the same sort of thing and some seem a little false in their over-sentimentality. But one caught my eye, and after reading it I cannot agree more-


    http://www.umbrelr.com/robin-williams-die-suicide/

    Here's an extract-
    “Robin Williams didn’t die from suicide. I only just heard the sad, sad news of Robin Williams’s death. My wife sent me a message to tell me he had died, and, when I asked her what he died from, she told me something that nobody in the news seems to be talking about.
    When people die from cancer, their cause of death can be various horrible things – seizure, stroke, pneumonia – and when someone dies after battling cancer, and people ask “How did they die?”, you never hear anyone say “pulmonary embolism”, the answer is always “cancer”. A Pulmonary Embolism can be the final cause of death with some cancers, but when a friend of mine died from cancer, he died from cancer. That was it. And when I asked my wife what Robin Williams died from, she, very wisely, replied “Depression”.


    Now this just perfectly sums up how I feel about depression. It was his depression that killed him. As with cancer, depression was the primary cause, and the act of suicide was secondary to that, just like when a person dies from cancer, they technically die of a complication resulting from cancer. But the cause of their death, was cancer. This to me, is exactly the same. And if we all looked at it more like this, the stigma surrounding mental illness would largely reduce. There would be less of a mindset of the individual being somehow at fault, somehow they had a weakness and they succumbed to it. And it would also in turn, reduce the notion that somehow the act of suicide is selfish.
    Depression is, after all, death resulting from an ​illness. Yes, the illness was mental rather than physical, but does that make it less of an illness? Does that mean because it was confined to the mind and not the physical body, the person should be more responsible for it? Should the person have more control over the illness because of this? Of course not. To me, suicide is no more selfish than dying from another illness.


    I know it can be quite hard to shirk the idea that the person actually caused their own death, it is after all, their own behaviour, their own actions, which they control. But what's important to remember is, when suffering from a severe and chronic mental illness, you are not in control of your behaviour, in the sense that you are not your rational self. As with cancer, cancer causes physical and physiological changes to your body, depression causes physical changes in your behaviour, your actions. It's not the individual that's causing the changes in behaviour, it's the illness.

    The brain (and subsequently the mind), has to be the most powerful part of us, when you consider what it does, what it is capable of, and how we are reliant on it to function in every possible way. When it comes to issues such as severe psychosis, cortical blindness, and severe hallucinations, people seem to be more understanding. In hallucinations, the brain is causing an individual to see with perfect vision, something that is not there. Or with an example of cortical blindness, the brain is causing someone with perfect eyesight not to see half of their visual field. But that grasp of the brain and mind being this powerful seems to be lost with illnesses such as depression and anxiety.
    If the brain is so capable that it creates and controls our perception of the world around us, is the idea of a mental illness changing our behaviour that strange? Is the thought that illogical to the extent where we cannot accept that suicide results from illness and is instead some failing in character?


    I'd just like to hear some others thoughts on this



    Wholeheartedly, I agree with your argument. Depression can be as consequential an illness as any other, and we should recognise that William's situation dictated his behavior.

    However, my question would be: who are you attempting to convince? I know of not once person who might disagree with you, and state that his suicide was the result of a "failing in character".
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    (Original post by RocketCiaranJ)
    Wholeheartedly, I agree with your argument. Depression can be as consequential an illness as any other, and we should recognise that William's situation dictated his behavior.

    However, my question would be: who are you attempting to convince? I know of not once person who might disagree with you, and state that his suicide was the result of a "failing in character".
    There's often been threads and posts on here about suicide being selfish. People asking questions like 'how could they do that to their families?' And that sort of thing. I know of quite a few people who have in the passed labelled a suicide attempt as 'attention seeking'.


    There's also been quite a few discussions on here as to whether depression is an actual illness.
    Even GPs often fail to treat depression with the seriousness it deserves.
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    (Original post by TolerantBeing)
    There's often been threads and posts on here about suicide being selfish. People asking questions like 'how could they do that to their families?' And that sort of thing. I know of quite a few people who have in the passed labelled a suicide attempt as 'attention seeking'.


    There's also been quite a few discussions on here as to whether depression is an actual illness.
    Even GPs often fail to treat depression with the seriousness it deserves.
    I created that thread myself, with the opinion that suicide is absolutely not selfish. Small world. Anyway, although there were those who would disagree, the number of people who voted this way on the poll were in the minority; and also appeared to be slightly naive.
 
 
 
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