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    Hello,

    I'm thinking about doing an Open University degree. However I'm in full time work, typically 9-5:30, and I was wondering how others have got a long working similar hours?

    I am currently looking at doing the 60 credits per year, so over 6 years. I still don't fully understand how it works though. I'm keen on either Business studies or engineering. I thought you'd need practical experience with engineering however.

    People have mentioned student finance only covers 4 years? If I do the 6 year part-time degree, how would this work?

    Is it all at home, or will I have to visit places once in a while to complete the degree? As I'm not sure if my work will be lenient with this.

    How does the degree work, as people have mentioned several levels. Do I pick 2 modules from each level?

    I'm currently 21, are there many others at a similar age to me? I didn't do quite so well in my A-levels as I'd hoped, but I know I am capable, and I've got to the point where I really want to do well for my self.

    Do you still get awarded for example; 2:1, 2:2's etc as a level for completing the degree?

    Thanks for any help.
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    You do 3 levels, unless you decide to take an openings/access module which is sorta "pre level 1". You then do 120 credits at each level. Different modules have different credits, but generally the higher levels are all 60 credits and level 1 can be 10, 15, 30 or 60. Level 1 is equivalent to first year of full time uni, level 2 is 2nd, level 3 is 3rd.

    You'll get a mark for each module, although level 1 is usually just awarded a pass or fail. Then these marks are taken to make your overall degree mark which will be 2:1, 2:2's etc.

    Full time student funding is different to part time. All 6 years can be funded.

    Studying is mostly from home. There are tutorials and day schools which can be optional and are usually held at weekends. These are roughly once a month or less often. So you might find that you can attend outside of working hours. You will also have some exams - some modules have one, others have a piece of coursework (EMA or end of module assessment). Exams are during the week, but so rare that you'll only do one a year or so.
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    Great! Thanks for the info!

    I'd much prefer the coursework side, so I'm glad that's the case with most modules. It's good the day schools are on the weekend too, very beneficial.

    How long do you have for each module? Or is time unlimited and you can just do it at your own pace? Say take a couple of weeks break between each one?

    I think it will definitely be worth it in the long run. Are you studying one?
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    (Original post by ggg92)
    Great! Thanks for the info!

    I'd much prefer the coursework side, so I'm glad that's the case with most modules. It's good the day schools are on the weekend too, very beneficial.

    How long do you have for each module? Or is time unlimited and you can just do it at your own pace? Say take a couple of weeks break between each one?

    I think it will definitely be worth it in the long run. Are you studying one?
    Modules have set timescales. Most start in October, but there are other start dates (usually September or February, sometimes May). Then you get set dates you need to submit work by, and a set date the module will end. It does vary with different modules, but usually 60 credit modules that start in October will end in June. Generally you will upload your TMA (tutor marked assessment, ie piece of homework) online, but occasionally for some subjects you will need to post it. Then the next module will have a set start date, so you have a set gap between each one.

    It seems to be one of those things where everyone goes in knowing nothing, but you learn as you go along - not just about the degree subject, but also about how the degree works.

    I have been studying since 2008. I'm doing a degree in social sciences, although have changed plans along the way.
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    Ah okay. How often are the written pieces and how big are they usually? This sounds like a great opportunity. Are you working at all at the same time?
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    I am doing Law through the open university and am in my second year. I also worked full time in my first year and did 120 credits which means 2 modules. However first year is pretty much easy enough and you can sail through it with full time work.

    Second and third years are much harder but not impossible. I procrastinated a lot and am finding it difficult but if you have a plan and you stay stuck to your study plans - it can work out fine.

    You will usually have an assignment to hand in roughly every month (you will be given dates depending on module) and if you struggle occasionally you can request extensions. Most level 1 modules don't have exams but level 2 and 3 modules have either 1 exam at the end of the module or residential school. I don't know a lot about residential school.

    Most stuff about the OU will not make sense, I did the work as it came and am still struggling to understand the system.
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    Also, with regards to the student finance; mid way through my degree, in theory I'll be earning more than the threshold, (touch wood) so how would this work? Would I just begin to pay back the student loan half way through the degree?
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    (Original post by ggg92)
    Ah okay. How often are the written pieces and how big are they usually? This sounds like a great opportunity. Are you working at all at the same time?
    It varies. Usually you have around 6 TMAs per module, but some will have different things as well. I've also only studied social sciences/humanities, so it's possible your engineering modules may vary.

    With the level 1 modules, your first TMA will be around 800 words or so. This will increase throughout the module, and the last TMA will be around 1500 words. Then level 2 are probably 1000 increasing to 2000. Level 3 are 1500+.

    However, some modules have various "parts" to the TMA. So you might have some short answer questions, and then an essay. Some will just have one essay as the piece of work. For maths etc you can't really have a word count!

    You will get a TMA booklet at the start of the module - for some modules this is online and you download it, but others give you a printed version. This tells you exactly what the question is, when to submit it, and how long it should be. For early modules you get some advice,like "read chapter 4" as well.

    I'm working full time. I used to work in retail and didn't have a set schedule, but now I work 9-6. Many people who study with the OU will work as well.
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    (Original post by Coffeegirl)
    I am doing Law through the open university and am in my second year. I also worked full time in my first year and did 120 credits which means 2 modules. However first year is pretty much easy enough and you can sail through it with full time work.

    Second and third years are much harder but not impossible. I procrastinated a lot and am finding it difficult but if you have a plan and you stay stuck to your study plans - it can work out fine.

    You will usually have an assignment to hand in roughly every month (you will be given dates depending on module) and if you struggle occasionally you can request extensions. Most level 1 modules don't have exams but level 2 and 3 modules have either 1 exam at the end of the module or residential school. I don't know a lot about residential school.

    Most stuff about the OU will not make sense, I did the work as it came and am still struggling to understand the system.
    Thanks for the information. How many hours were you doing per day/week to be able to get the 120 credits? Must have been a lot! Every month isn't too bad I guess! How long are they?

    Where are the exams held?
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    (Original post by Coffeegirl)
    level 2 and 3 modules have either 1 exam at the end of the module or residential school. I don't know a lot about residential school.
    That's not correct. Most modules don't have residential schools - and I mean a very large percentage don't. Modules either have an exam or a project (EMA).
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    (Original post by ggg92)
    Thanks for the information. How many hours were you doing per day/week to be able to get the 120 credits? Must have been a lot! Every month isn't too bad I guess! How long are they?

    Where are the exams held?
    The exams are held at a local centre which is closest to you. I wasn't really doing hours. For most of my studies, I did last minute reading which took a few days and writing the assignment which took a few more days and that was it really.

    They are usually no more than 2500 words. They can be split into 2 questions however. I can't say a lot as my modules will be completely different to the ones you will be doing.

    As with residential school, I have no clue about those and its best you look on OU website for information about that.
 
 
 
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