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how can you expect do group work if you commute watch

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    I get that people want to stay at home (can't see why) but really how can you expect to do well both socially and academically.

    I mean you have group work at uni no matter which course you do do you really expect to be able to do it if you go home every night it's not uncommon for groups to need to work up to at east 11:00pm especially when it involves a presentation even if you have finished the work you'll all need to practice sequencing etc you will be seen as not doing the work or trying to take credit for other people doing the work by the other people in your group if you rush off at 10:00 for a train and if you have a commute of 2 hours each way (as I have seen some people choose to do) it will be even earlier no matter if they know or not.
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    If you want to work late or soclalise, you just crash on someone's floor or sofa overnight.

    Plenty of people do well with lengthy commutes, so it's definitely manageable. My Masters was a 3 hour round trip away on a good day (much longer if trains/buses were delayed) and I was fine. Evening guest lectures or occasional nights out just meant arranging to stay with a friend. No big deal, you just have to be flexible.
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    (Original post by jonathanemptage)
    I get that people want to stay at home (can't see why) but really how can you expect to do well both socially and academically.

    I mean you have group work at uni no matter which course you do do you really expect to be able to do it if you go home every night it's not uncommon for groups to need to work up to at east 11:00pm especially when it involves a presentation even if you have finished the work you'll all need to practice sequencing etc you will be seen as not doing the work or trying to take credit for other people doing the work by the other people in your group if you rush off at 10:00 for a train and if you have a commute of 2 hours each way (as I have seen some people choose to do) it will be even earlier no matter if they know or not.
    You can skip the commute and do group work over skype/ google hangouts or similar?
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    If you want to work late or soclalise, you just crash on someone's floor or sofa overnight.

    Plenty of people do well with lengthy commutes, so it's definitely manageable. My Masters was a 3 hour round trip away on a good day (much longer if trains/buses were delayed) and I was fine. Evening guest lectures or occasional nights out just meant arranging to stay with a friend. No big deal, you just have to be flexible.
    I lived in halls but I was more talking about undergraduate when people might not know each other so well and of course it's harder to get to know people if you have to rush home every night.
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    Most of my studying will be done at university anyway, also I don't live far from the university I'm attending. In terms of socially: I can meet my course mates either at the university if it's a event at the SU Bar or at a meeting point in the town centre if it's at a club.

    I don't see why living at home is such a problem.
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    (Original post by FutureHeartSurg)
    You can skip the commute and do group work over skype/ google hangouts or similar?
    We had someone try this once, it's a total ****ing nightmare. They couldn't get themselves heard, they couldn't really practice the presentation, they had to disappear every 5 mins whilst we put the actual work on the screen etc. etc.

    In the end they just slept at one of ours whenever we needed to do it rather than go through the kerfuffle above twice a week.
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    (Original post by jonathanemptage)
    I lived in halls but I was more talking about undergraduate when people might not know each other so well and of course it's harder to get to know people if you have to rush home every night.
    Not really different to my Masters - we'd all done undergrad at different unis and we didn't know each other before we started. You can socialise and work during daylight hours, as well as arranging to stay late when you want to. It's not a problem.
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    I'm hoping to live at home and commute if I get into my top choice uni next year, due to some health reasons, and that it would also affect my mum's living situation if I moved out, as she can't work.

    I agree with a lot that has been said here. Living away from home isn't an option for some people. I'm sure there's a million and one ways around the commute, like crashing with a friend or whatever. It annoys me that some people can't see both sides of the argument. Sure, living away from home sounds great but some people can't do that, or don't want to. Then people who live on site get all snooty about it. No need for it, really.


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    (Original post by jaydamber)
    I'm hoping to live at home and commute if I get into my top choice uni next year, due to some health reasons, and that it would also affect my mum's living situation if I moved out, as she can't work.

    I agree with a lot that has been said here. Living away from home isn't an option for some people. I'm sure there's a million and one ways around the commute, like crashing with a friend or whatever. It annoys me that some people can't see both sides of the argument. Sure, living away from home sounds great but some people can't do that, or don't want to. Then people who live on site get all snooty about it. No need for it, really.


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    I'm not getting all snooty I'm interested to see the other side of the coin thats why I asked
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    (Original post by jonathanemptage)
    I get that people want to stay at home (can't see why) but really how can you expect to do well both socially and academically.

    I mean you have group work at uni no matter which course you do do you really expect to be able to do it if you go home every night it's not uncommon for groups to need to work up to at east 11:00pm especially when it involves a presentation even if you have finished the work you'll all need to practice sequencing etc you will be seen as not doing the work or trying to take credit for other people doing the work by the other people in your group if you rush off at 10:00 for a train and if you have a commute of 2 hours each way (as I have seen some people choose to do) it will be even earlier no matter if they know or not.
    firstly not every single course has group work - I do law and have never once had a group work assignment.

    BUT... if I did, it wouldn't be an issue, I'd just stay over if we were working really late or do it at the library then head home (my commute is only 30mins).

    Not really a big deal. I live at home and think I do well socially and academically.


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    I live at home and haven't had any issues with socialising or group work throughout uni. In fact, I've often found that the people that bail on group work early are the ones that are going out to get pissed because they can't skip one of their sports socials because they're scared the rest of the team will forget who they are or something. Or worse, you plan to meet your group and half of them don't turn up because they're hungover in bed even though they live NEXT DOOR to the library. I hate group work at uni, it is not beneficial to anyone.
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    (Original post by jonathanemptage)
    I get that people want to stay at home (can't see why) but really how can you expect to do well both socially and academically.

    I mean you have group work at uni no matter which course you do do you really expect to be able to do it if you go home every night it's not uncommon for groups to need to work up to at east 11:00pm especially when it involves a presentation even if you have finished the work you'll all need to practice sequencing etc you will be seen as not doing the work or trying to take credit for other people doing the work by the other people in your group if you rush off at 10:00 for a train and if you have a commute of 2 hours each way (as I have seen some people choose to do) it will be even earlier no matter if they know or not.
    Had plenty of group work on my course, and have not once stayed working outside of normal working hours (9-5). And I got high 2:1 or 1st marks for them..



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    One of my friends on my course lives 30 miles away and drives in every day, and I managed to do a group project with her (and a few other people) just fine...we just started working on it as early as possible and fitted it in around our timetables during the week, so that she didn't have to come in especially to do the group work - we'd work on it during a break between lectures or just before or after them. Her living at home was never really an issue, and it wasn't when I did group work with another coursemate who lived at home either. There are ways to work around it if you're doing group work with someone who commutes to uni. In the groups I've worked in we've tended to divide the work up between us, and go away and do it in our own time and then meet up every once in a while to piece things together - it works better if you're not working on it together all of the time IMO.
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    I live a 20 minute bus ride away from my uni, which (I THINK) might be closer than some of the halls.

    tbh I had no choice but to live here and I'll find a way to work around it. Plus if we end up staying at uni super late I'll tell them that I dont live in halls and if I miss my last bus I'm either crashing on someones floor or getting a taxi.

    (and not every course has group work... you could work in groups on my old course but it wasnt essential and it was often preferable to work alone)
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    (Original post by jonathanemptage)
    I get that people want to stay at home (can't see why) but really how can you expect to do well both socially and academically.

    I mean you have group work at uni no matter which course you do do you really expect to be able to do it if you go home every night it's not uncommon for groups to need to work up to at east 11:00pm especially when it involves a presentation even if you have finished the work you'll all need to practice sequencing etc you will be seen as not doing the work or trying to take credit for other people doing the work by the other people in your group if you rush off at 10:00 for a train and if you have a commute of 2 hours each way (as I have seen some people choose to do) it will be even earlier no matter if they know or not.
    Firstly, I dont get your comment "I cant see why"- there are many reasons why people stay at home, not everyone has the money to move out or is from a family who can afford to throw money at you to pay for your accommodation, food, bills etc. not everyone is in the same boat. its not always a choice but rather you have no other choice.

    secondly, i havent had to do group work myself on my course but my friends have and they managed fine. actually, my friend who commutes also had to do pretty much all of the work, as those who lived in halls were so lazy and had zero input. its not about where you live, its about you as a person and whether you work hard or not.

    another friend simply got everyones numbers so it was easy to arrange when was best for everyone to meet up.

    another stayed in the library til 2am with his group, he drives so it wasnt an issue for him to get home.

    so yeah, it doesnt matter whether you commute or not, but whether you put the work in or actually make any effort and contribute to the group, and as my friend experienced, him traveling didnt matter cos he was the only one who bothered to do any of the work whilst the rest shrugged and didnt say or do anything.
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    (Original post by jonathanemptage)
    I get that people want to stay at home (can't see why) but really how can you expect to do well both socially and academically.

    I mean you have group work at uni no matter which course you do do you really expect to be able to do it if you go home every night it's not uncommon for groups to need to work up to at east 11:00pm especially when it involves a presentation even if you have finished the work you'll all need to practice sequencing etc you will be seen as not doing the work or trying to take credit for other people doing the work by the other people in your group if you rush off at 10:00 for a train and if you have a commute of 2 hours each way (as I have seen some people choose to do) it will be even earlier no matter if they know or not.
    Really, you're making it out to be much harder than it really is. :rolleyes:

    Two of my good friends at uni lived at home, at least an hour's drive away. All it meant was they got first dibs for crashing on people's sofa/floor/spare bed (if applicable). My friend stayed over in halls with me plenty of times - it's really no big deal. As in, "Hey, so we're going out to x tonight; Susie, are you crashing on my floor or are you already sorted?" SIMPLES.

    Also, not everyone necessarily "chooses" to live at home, and if they do, so what? Some people have circumstances at home eg relatives to care for or other responsibilities; some people have medical/personal issues; some people can't afford to move out; sometimes if there aren't enough spaces in halls etc the university might prioritise students from far away over students who already live within commuting distance; some people just prefer to live at home, or don't want to be woken up 6 times a night by fire alarms (as was frequent in my halls).

    If you're personally that concerned about someone in your group not being able to contribute to a project because they commute, how about you use your own initiative and offer to let them crash at yours? Problem solved.

    Just because someone commutes, doesn't mean they won't contribute to group projects. As someone else pointed out, students who live on campus, next door to each other, a minute's walk to the library, aren't immune to ducking out of group work for lesser reasons.

    Personally, I found some of my friends who commuted, to be even more diligent in making the best use of the time they spent on campus, because they didn't have the option of, say, dashing back to their room for something between lectures.
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    (Original post by jonathanemptage)
    I get that people want to stay at home (can't see why) but really how can you expect to do well both socially and academically.

    I mean you have group work at uni no matter which course you do do you really expect to be able to do it if you go home every night it's not uncommon for groups to need to work up to at east 11:00pm especially when it involves a presentation even if you have finished the work you'll all need to practice sequencing etc you will be seen as not doing the work or trying to take credit for other people doing the work by the other people in your group if you rush off at 10:00 for a train and if you have a commute of 2 hours each way (as I have seen some people choose to do) it will be even earlier no matter if they know or not.
    I live a 10-15 minute train ride from the university. An annual rail pass is cheaper than the halls at the university. The halls work out as the worse decision financially and as I'm not a big drinker or clubber socially too as I would meet most friends through clubs and societies at the university. With people who commute for over 2 hours I agree it's a bad choice but when you are talking under 30 minutes it doesn't make a difference.
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    (Original post by Madeline_H95)
    I live a 10-15 minute train ride from the university. An annual rail pass is cheaper than the halls at the university. The halls work out as the worse decision financially and as I'm not a big drinker or clubber socially too as I would meet most friends through clubs and societies at the university. With people who commute for over 2 hours I agree it's a bad choice but when you are talking under 30 minutes it doesn't make a difference.
    My point exactly it's what I was getting at some people travel half an hour from halls (walking but still) when I say commute I mean like from Reading to Bournmouth it's just not possible and probably cheaper to stay in halls.
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    (Original post by treasureBelle)
    Really, you're making it out to be much harder than it really is. :rolleyes:

    Two of my good friends at uni lived at home, at least an hour's drive away. All it meant was they got first dibs for crashing on people's sofa/floor/spare bed (if applicable). My friend stayed over in halls with me plenty of times - it's really no big deal. As in, "Hey, so we're going out to x tonight; Susie, are you crashing on my floor or are you already sorted?" SIMPLES.

    Also, not everyone necessarily "chooses" to live at home, and if they do, so what? Some people have circumstances at home eg relatives to care for or other responsibilities; some people have medical/personal issues; some people can't afford to move out; sometimes if there aren't enough spaces in halls etc the university might prioritise students from far away over students who already live within commuting distance; some people just prefer to live at home, or don't want to be woken up 6 times a night by fire alarms (as was frequent in my halls).

    If you're personally that concerned about someone in your group not being able to contribute to a project because they commute, how about you use your own initiative and offer to let them crash at yours? Problem solved.

    Just because someone commutes, doesn't mean they won't contribute to group projects. As someone else pointed out, students who live on campus, next door to each other, a minute's walk to the library, aren't immune to ducking out of group work for lesser reasons.

    Personally, I found some of my friends who commuted, to be even more diligent in making the best use of the time they spent on campus, because they didn't have the option of, say, dashing back to their room for something between lectures.
    You seem to have taken offence that was not my intention at all I was simply asking the question because on my course no one commuted because I was the only native Englishman on the course most of the others were from the Arab States working for KOC

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