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    My local colleges offer an Art and Design foundation year, and I didn't know whether I should do a foundation year first or go straight onto a degree. Have any of you taken an Art foundation course?

    How did you find it? Why did you take it? Did it make you come to any conclusions before University, or do you think it didn't make a difference?

    For reference, right now I take Fine Art, Art and Design and ICT A-Levels.
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    (Original post by betweentheclocks)
    My local colleges offer an Art and Design foundation year, and I didn't know whether I should do a foundation year first or go straight onto a degree. Have any of you taken an Art foundation course?

    How did you find it? Why did you take it? Did it make you come to any conclusions before University, or do you think it didn't make a difference?

    For reference, right now I take Fine Art, Art and Design and ICT A-Levels.
    Many students say it's the best year of their life. Most agree that it increases the professionalism of their work much more than they imagined possible. It helps to focus the portfolio on the pathway you are applying for afterwards. Most of the good art schools will require a foundation course and even at those which don't, you will be competing with applicants who have done one and are that much more professional and accomplished than those who didn't. Many students stay at home to do the foundation course because it doesn't matter much where you do it, and it carries no entitlement to student finance as it is FE not HE, and many can't afford to move out. It is free if you are under 19, though.
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    (Original post by betweentheclocks)
    My local colleges offer an Art and Design foundation year, and I didn't know whether I should do a foundation year first or go straight onto a degree. Have any of you taken an Art foundation course?

    How did you find it? Why did you take it? Did it make you come to any conclusions before University, or do you think it didn't make a difference?

    For reference, right now I take Fine Art, Art and Design and ICT A-Levels.
    I am wondering this same thing too, everybody keeps telling me that the foundation is really brilliant for building a portfolio. That said some universities, such as lancaster (who offer fine art), say they have no preference for it. Personally I am leaning towards taking one just for the sake of an extra year to improve my standard of work so that I am on a level playing field with everybody else - It seems foolish to jump on at degree level when everybody will be older and more experienced than me even if i did manage to get a place. Sorry that doesn't really answer your question - but I thought it might help.
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    I was wondering if it was possible to apply for the full BA courses you are interested through UCAS and also any Foundation courses you are interested in (which I think is separate from the UCAS process?) and then pick from your best choice? What is the downside of that approach?

    I also wondered if the chance of getting an offer at straight BA application was significantly affected by your AS results and the quality of your portfolio?

    So for example, my daughter has the same debate but was shocked by her AS results, where she did much better than she thought. Obviously, that says nothing about her portfolio, but I would have thought results and portfolio would increase the chance.

    One option she was considering was Oxford, who have a very strong recommendation for a foundation. But even for them, they say it is 80-20, so some non-foundation holders get it. And I'm not even sure their stats hold up to that - I have a feeling that the stats themselves suggest it might be closer to 60-40.
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    (Original post by bb193)
    I was wondering if it was possible to apply for the full BA courses you are interested through UCAS and also any Foundation courses you are interested in (which I think is separate from the UCAS process?) and then pick from your best choice? What is the downside of that approach?

    I also wondered if the chance of getting an offer at straight BA application was significantly affected by your AS results and the quality of your portfolio?

    So for example, my daughter has the same debate but was shocked by her AS results, where she did much better than she thought. Obviously, that says nothing about her portfolio, but I would have thought results and portfolio would increase the chance.

    One option she was considering was Oxford, who have a very strong recommendation for a foundation. But even for them, they say it is 80-20, so some non-foundation holders get it. And I'm not even sure their stats hold up to that - I have a feeling that the stats themselves suggest it might be closer to 60-40.
    There is no down side to applying to both, and if you get offers from both, then that's great, but it really is all about the portfolio, and grades, once the minimum is met, don't really matter. In addition, if a university advises a foundation, then listen to that advice. I know all mums think their kids are super-talented (I know I did!) but few 18 year olds are as accomplished as a 19 year old with a portfolio which has been worked on to the exclusion of all else for a whole year, and directed at one specific pathway, and I would seriously advise, both as a teacher and mother of an art graduate, doing a foundation course.
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    I know the sample is very, very small, but I thought the Unistats comparison on this was quite interesting -

    http://unistats.direct.gov.uk/Compar...T-UTBAHARTXX1F

    If you click on the Entry Information tab, it gives some indication about the qualification of the small number of entrants that have input data into the site. I'm assuming that it falls under 'Different higher education qualification' rather than the more obvious 'Foundation course' (which is the only row which says there is not enough data available).
 
 
 
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