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    I was having a discussion with a friend who hadn't ever heard of the phrase 'to bowl up', meaning to casually turn up or arrive (i.e. 'you can't just bowl up unannounced'). I thought it must be a British thing, as my friend's American, but an unfruitful search has left me confused. Not even the LUXURY edition of the esteemed Concise Oxford English Dictionary yields any results. I have also tried Google. Other people do say this, right? Please tell me I haven't just made this up - or am I just spelling it wrong?
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    I've heard of the phrase "to roll up" in that context, but never "to bowl up"
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    (Original post by Short_Round)
    I've heard of the phrase "to roll up" in that context, but never "to bowl up"
    Hmmm, interesting...Maybe I (and the whole of my family) have just corrupted that phrase then? I swear I've heard other people say it though :P I'M HAVING A LINGUISTIC CRISIS!
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    (Original post by fajita.and.friends)
    Hmmm, interesting...Maybe I (and the whole of my family) have just corrupted that phrase then? I swear I've heard other people say it though :P I'M HAVING A LINGUISTIC CRISIS!
    :laugh: Even if it's not a proper phrase, you could start a new trend and get it into the dictionary yourself!
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    (Original post by Short_Round)
    :laugh: Even if it's not a proper phrase, you could start a new trend and get it into the dictionary yourself!
    Haha, maybe I should! I'm not far off phoning up Oxford and demanding an explanation anyway
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    Ive heard of it. Perhaps it regional..?
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    (Original post by fajita.and.friends)
    Haha, maybe I should! I'm not far off phoning up Oxford and demanding an explanation anyway
    I wish you luck on your noble mission!
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    (Original post by Limpopo)
    Ive heard of it. Perhaps it regional..?
    Could be...I'm from London but I haven't lived in the UK for a few years now still don't get why it isn't anywhere to be found online though!
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    Yep, I have heard of it and in fact use the phrase myself occasionally. I found this online
    This verb stems from the analogy of a bowling ball. It arrives (at the end of the alley) with a certain force. One might speak of someone "bowling into the office" if he arrives on the run, slams to door wide open and generally attracts the attention of everyone present.

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    (Original post by Short_Round)
    I wish you luck on your noble mission!
    Why thank you
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    (Original post by Archer111)
    Yep, I have heard of it and in fact use the phrase myself occasionally. I found this online
    This verb stems from the analogy of a bowling ball. It arrives (at the end of the alley) with a certain force. One might speak of someone "bowling into the office" if he arrives on the run, slams to door wide open and generally attracts the attention of everyone present.

    Ah, great! Did you find that on an English forum? I saw that too, was the one and only thing I could find though - just thought it was interesting that it wasn't in any dictionaries...At least I know I'm not going mad now
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    There's a term in Bermondsey, South London, where a 'bowl' is a particular way of walking.. So 'to bowl up' would make sense in that context. If you search 'Bermondsey Bowl' online you'll find a few references. I'm not sure how common it is in conversation though.
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    (Original post by Citizen_UK)
    There's a term in Bermondsey, South London, where a 'bowl' is a particular way of walking.. So 'to bowl up' would make sense in that context. If you search 'Bermondsey Bowl' online you'll find a few references. I'm not sure how common it is in conversation though.
    How interesting, thanks for the insight! I'm so determined to find out where this comes from now
 
 
 
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