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Michael Wharton
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#1
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Hello Ladies and Gentlemen,

(None of this Hi All rubbish - I'm English and I like the formalities of English as spoken
in England.)

Please could you help with a question in my son's homework? It is also a fact I would like to know
about the English language.

Firstly, is it grammatically satisfactory to start a sentence with the word "And . . . "?

Secondly, what does a writer usually try to convey by using "And"? As background to this, my son is
looking at a past paper for Key Stage
2. It is a booklet called "Time Trouble". I think one of the questions is, "What do you think the
writer is trying to convey?"

I will only have a short opportunity to look at the question again in the morning. Does anyone know
what the right answer should be?

TIA.
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Derek McMillan
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It is an archaic formulation: "And did those feet, in ancient time Walk upon England's mountains
green....etc" Now that the word "and" is used as a conjunction, its archaic use for emphasis has
fallen into disuse.

If the sentence follows another the use of "And" conveys a continuation of the idea in the previous
sentence. As such it suggests that there should not be a separate sentence.

If you like the way English is *spoken* in England then "Hi" is more used than "Hello, Ladies and
Gentlemen."

On Mon, 04 Feb 2002 22:10:16 +0000, Michael Wharton <[email protected]> wrote:

[q1]>Hello Ladies and Gentlemen,[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>(None of this Hi All rubbish - I'm English and I like the formalities of English as spoken in[/q1]
[q1]>England.)[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>Please could you help with a question in my son's homework? It is also a fact I would like to know[/q1]
[q1]>about the English language.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>Firstly, is it grammatically satisfactory to start a sentence with the word "And . . . "?[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>Secondly, what does a writer usually try to convey by using "And"? As background to this, my son is[/q1]
[q1]>looking at a past paper for Key Stage[/q1]
[q1]>2. It is a booklet called "Time Trouble". I think one of the questions is, "What do you think the[/q1]
[q1]> writer is trying to convey?"[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>I will only have a short opportunity to look at the question again in the morning. Does anyone know[/q1]
[q1]>what the right answer should be?[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>TIA.[/q1]

-----------------------------------------------

http://www.geocities.com/derekmcmillan1951 mirrored at http://derekmcmillan.tripod.com Media Studies
texts and Shakespeare plays You can contact me using messenger or my email address.
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Michael Wharton
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Thanks for correcting me about "Hi".

I'm happy now that I know more about how "and" is used.

Reminds me of a TV programme about the English language which did explain that it is changing and
some words come and go as dictionaries are updated.

The presenter neatly ended the programme saying something like, "So is English a living, changing
language, is it?" ......... "I should co-co!"

Thanks.
- - -

Derek McMillan wrote:

[q1]> It is an archaic formulation: "And did those feet, in ancient time Walk upon England's mountains[/q1]
[q1]> green....etc" Now that the word "and" is used as a conjunction, its archaic use for emphasis has[/q1]
[q1]> fallen into disuse.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> If the sentence follows another the use of "And" conveys a continuation of the idea in the[/q1]
[q1]> previous sentence. As such it suggests that there should not be a separate sentence.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> If you like the way English is *spoken* in England then "Hi" is more used than "Hello, Ladies and[/q1]
[q1]> Gentlemen." [/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> On Mon, 04 Feb 2002 22:10:16 +0000, Michael Wharton <[email protected]> wrote:[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> >Hello Ladies and Gentlemen,[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> >(None of this Hi All rubbish - I'm English and I like the formalities of English as spoken in[/q2]
[q2]> >England.)[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> >Please could you help with a question in my son's homework? It is also a fact I would like to[/q2]
[q2]> >know about the English language.[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> >Firstly, is it grammatically satisfactory to start a sentence with the word "And . . . "?[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> >Secondly, what does a writer usually try to convey by using "And"? As background to this, my son[/q2]
[q2]> >is looking at a past paper for Key Stage[/q2]
[q2]> >2. It is a booklet called "Time Trouble". I think one of the questions is, "What do you think the[/q2]
[q2]> > writer is trying to convey?"[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> >I will only have a short opportunity to look at the question again in the morning. Does anyone[/q2]
[q2]> >know what the right answer should be?[/q2]
[q2]> >[/q2]
[q2]> >TIA.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> -----------------------------------------------[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> http://www.geocities.com/derekmcmillan1951 mirrored at http://derekmcmillan.tripod.com Media[/q1]
[q1]> Studies texts and Shakespeare plays You can contact me using messenger or my email address.[/q1]
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David Batty
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In article <[email protected]>, Michael Wharton <[email protected]> writes
[q1]>Please could you help with a question in my son's homework? It is also a fact I would like to know[/q1]
[q1]>about the English language.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]>Firstly, is it grammatically satisfactory to start a sentence with the word "And . . . "?[/q1]
It is not correct to start a sentence with the word 'And', a sentence should be understandable on
it's own, the prefixing of the word 'And' requires you to know the contents of the previous sentence
in order to understand the one that starts with the word 'And'.

I have sometimes seen this kind of mistake in American books where anything seems to be correct.
Surprisingly, this prefix to a sentence was also in Today's Daily Mail.
--

David Batty

http://www.sectorsoftware.co.uk email [email protected] ICQ 106787612

Learn to touch type: Purchase Touch Typist at http://www.typingtutor.co.uk
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