imdumbuneedhelp
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Hey People,
I need some advice, as I am going in uni in 2015. I am not sure what the perfect course is for me.
I am a hands on practical person but at the same time I want my course to be interesting fun and enjoyable. I'm not the type of person who wants to study hard but somewhat get a degree then a job.
I quite like the idea of property developing and selling etc or making my own dream home architecture seems too intellect and I'm not amazing at drawing!
so as the title suggests
which of these 2 courses meet my conditions or maybe another similar course you could suggest?

thanks for your help
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a10
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(Original post by imdumbuneedhelp)
Hey People,
I need some advice, as I am going in uni in 2015. I am not sure what the perfect course is for me.
I am a hands on practical person but at the same time I want my course to be interesting fun and enjoyable. I'm not the type of person who wants to study hard but somewhat get a degree then a job.
I quite like the idea of property developing and selling etc or making my own dream home architecture seems too intellect and I'm not amazing at drawing!
so as the title suggests
which of these 2 courses meet my conditions or maybe another similar course you could suggest?

thanks for your help
tbh if youre interested in property development then i suggest civil engineering or something similar along those lines.

What is your ideal career?
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imdumbuneedhelp
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(Original post by a10)
tbh if youre interested in property development then i suggest civil engineering or something similar along those lines.

What is your ideal career?
I really don't know but I have like a keen interest on dynamic and architectural buildings and houses but I'm not sure if a course in construction management or civil engineering would be good as i am no good in physics.
however I love product design as I'm good on the practical side of things and in my AS I managed to get an A overall so yeh like I am better at Design and technology but have a higher interest in contemporary buildings houses and architecture and stuff

thanks for your help again!
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lsaul95
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(Original post by imdumbuneedhelp)
Hey People,
I need some advice, as I am going in uni in 2015. I am not sure what the perfect course is for me.
I am a hands on practical person but at the same time I want my course to be interesting fun and enjoyable. I'm not the type of person who wants to study hard but somewhat get a degree then a job.
I quite like the idea of property developing and selling etc or making my own dream home architecture seems too intellect and I'm not amazing at drawing!
so as the title suggests
which of these 2 courses meet my conditions or maybe another similar course you could suggest?

thanks for your help
Hello there!

No-one can tell you which course is right for you, the best thing you can do for yourself is research areas based on your interests. For example, if you like Product Design then check out the course content for product design engineering that universities offer. Simple google searches can get you a lot of information. Try searching things like careers in construction in product design. Check out prospects.ac.uk, they tend to have some useful information as to where degrees can lead etc.
The best thing you can do is inform yourself about the different options out there, check out what courses you can do to pursue those options and see which one fits you well.

I can, however, tell you a little bit about the courses you have mentioned/considered yourself to get you started!

I have a friend doing Architecture right now at Newcastle University, from what he's told me it is more based on design and the development of your ideas and theories of architecture than anything heavily mathematical/physics based. Check out the course content for different universities, see if it appeals to you at all. It is also a very long training path though, my friend said he'd be qualified in around 7-9 years worth of schooling, I can't remember exactly though, and I'm too lazy to look it up, so don't quote me on that!

Construction management would more be about managing construction projects. Learning about managing costs, resources, workers, etc. You would learn about the technical side of construction and construction engineering too.

Civil Engineering can lead to a lot of different areas, including construction. Civil engineering is about people, and civil engineering work on projects and develop things that are used by the public. I just ripped this off a website "Civil engineers design and build bridges, roads, railways, and tunnels. They design and build tall structures and large buildings such as multi-storey car parks, train stations, and even the Olympic stadium." Be wary that this and most engineering courses require a strong knowledge and liking of mathematics and physics. The design in Engineering is very technical and very precise.

I'm not sure about product design, like I say though, the best thing to do is google what options there are with your interests, check out prospects, see if there's anything that sounds interesting to you as a job, check out the different courses offered at uni, look at their course content, what sounds interesting to you, look at their entry requirements, etc etc etcccccc

Best of luck, the search for the course perfect to you is an absolute nightmare, because there isnt a set formula where you input your interests and out pops a course, there are a lot of variables to consider, like entry requirements, subject requirements, etc etc, but with a lot of research you can make it easy, but anywhoooo questions please feel free to ask
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a10
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(Original post by imdumbuneedhelp)
I really don't know but I have like a keen interest on dynamic and architectural buildings and houses but I'm not sure if a course in construction management or civil engineering would be good as i am no good in physics.
however I love product design as I'm good on the practical side of things and in my AS I managed to get an A overall so yeh like I am better at Design and technology but have a higher interest in contemporary buildings houses and architecture and stuff

thanks for your help again!
Hmm PDE is not very practical and actually contains a lot of maths and physics however if you want a more hands on approach (i.e. making real life models from wood/metal/plastic) then BSc Product design might suit you better although there's drawing involved in that but you don't have to be amazing drawer to do it, in fact some drawings are done on CAD modelling software. The course is also really light on the maths and physics.

I'm not sure about the construction management course you mentioned but to me it sounds like you like designing/and or making stuff more as opposed to property development in which case I would suggest doing Product Design as you get to deal with that sort of stuff most the time. Be aware though anything with engineering in the title will contain lots of maths and physics.
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imdumbuneedhelp
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(Original post by lsaul95)
Hello there!

No-one can tell you which course is right for you, the best thing you can do for yourself is research areas based on your interests. For example, if you like Product Design then check out the course content for product design engineering that universities offer. Simple google searches can get you a lot of information. Try searching things like careers in construction in product design. Check out prospects.ac.uk, they tend to have some useful information as to where degrees can lead etc.
The best thing you can do is inform yourself about the different options out there, check out what courses you can do to pursue those options and see which one fits you well.

I can, however, tell you a little bit about the courses you have mentioned/considered yourself to get you started!

I have a friend doing Architecture right now at Newcastle University, from what he's told me it is more based on design and the development of your ideas and theories of architecture than anything heavily mathematical/physics based. Check out the course content for different universities, see if it appeals to you at all. It is also a very long training path though, my friend said he'd be qualified in around 7-9 years worth of schooling, I can't remember exactly though, and I'm too lazy to look it up, so don't quote me on that!

Construction management would more be about managing construction projects. Learning about managing costs, resources, workers, etc. You would learn about the technical side of construction and construction engineering too.

Civil Engineering can lead to a lot of different areas, including construction. Civil engineering is about people, and civil engineering work on projects and develop things that are used by the public. I just ripped this off a website "Civil engineers design and build bridges, roads, railways, and tunnels. They design and build tall structures and large buildings such as multi-storey car parks, train stations, and even the Olympic stadium." Be wary that this and most engineering courses require a strong knowledge and liking of mathematics and physics. The design in Engineering is very technical and very precise.

I'm not sure about product design, like I say though, the best thing to do is google what options there are with your interests, check out prospects, see if there's anything that sounds interesting to you as a job, check out the different courses offered at uni, look at their course content, what sounds interesting to you, look at their entry requirements, etc etc etcccccc

Best of luck, the search for the course perfect to you is an absolute nightmare, because there isnt a set formula where you input your interests and out pops a course, there are a lot of variables to consider, like entry requirements, subject requirements, etc etc, but with a lot of research you can make it easy, but anywhoooo questions please feel free to ask
hey wow firstly thanks a lot for the effort of helping me with such a long answer to my question!

just to let you know i have done plenty of research for both the courses but because im more into the architectural side of things like buildings etc just wondering whether you know a degree in product design could lead me to have a job as someone like a property developer or something like that?
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imdumbuneedhelp
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(Original post by a10)
Hmm PDE is not very practical and actually contains a lot of maths and physics however if you want a more hands on approach (i.e. making real life models from wood/metal/plastic) then BSc Product design might suit you better although there's drawing involved in that but you don't have to be amazing drawer to do it, in fact some drawings are done on CAD modelling software. The course is also really light on the maths and physics.

I'm not sure about the construction management course you mentioned but to me it sounds like you like designing/and or making stuff more as opposed to property development in which case I would suggest doing Product Design as you get to deal with that sort of stuff most the time. Be aware though anything with engineering in the title will contain lots of maths and physics.
hmm...the thing is i like product design a lot and i like the practical side of it. the only issue is the risk of this degree as it doesn't have many job prospects. also thinking about it, its a degree in which you could fail in the future after graduating, as a product you design and make could turn out to be disastrous and beyond that inventing your own product can take several years of research, development etc which is the slight off putting point.
So im very undeceive at the moment as i said i like the idea of running my own business one day where i manage properties i have designed and made whether its houses for clients or big iconic buildings that have that creative flair in them.. could you possibly suggest another course that evolves around this? or do you feel civil engineering, architecture and/or construction management is the right course for me?
thanks
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lsaul95
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(Original post by imdumbuneedhelp)
hey wow firstly thanks a lot for the effort of helping me with such a long answer to my question!

just to let you know i have done plenty of research for both the courses but because im more into the architectural side of things like buildings etc just wondering whether you know a degree in product design could lead me to have a job as someone like a property developer or something like that?
No problemo.

As I say, I don't know a lot about product design and where it can lead. But from some quick research it seems like it's tailored more toward industrial design, like consumer products and stuff like that.

Here's what Prospects (you might not be able to tell but I'm a fan of prospects) says about your career prospects with a degree in product design -

"Jobs directly related to your degree include:
Exhibition designer
Further education lecturer
Higher education lecturer
Industrial/product designer
Secondary school teacher

Jobs where your degree would be useful include:
Advertising account executive
Automotive engineer
Marketing executive
Purchasing manager
Sales executive"

But saying that, I guess it's what you make of it, what experience you get, where you apply and all that rubbish. It's probably completely possible to work in property development and such with a degree in product design, whether it is the best option to get there though, is a different question.

From the sounds of it, Architecture may be suited to you. There are also degrees out there for Architecture/Property Development specifically!

What do you want to do specifically? Design buildings? Manage property construction??
If you want the design side of it, I'd say Architecture is right up that alley. You don't have to be great at drawing, remember you can use CAD programmes too which require no drawing ability ;D
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No problemo.

As I say, I don't know a lot about product design and where it can lead. But from some quick research it seems like it's tailored more toward industrial design, like consumer products and stuff like that.

Here's what Prospects (you might not be able to tell but I'm a fan of prospects) says about your career prospects with a degree in product design -

"Jobs directly related to your degree include:
Exhibition designer
Further education lecturer
Higher education lecturer
Industrial/product designer
Secondary school teacher

Jobs where your degree would be useful include:
Advertising account executive
Automotive engineer
Marketing executive
Purchasing manager
Sales executive"

But saying that, I guess it's what you make of it, what experience you get, where you apply and all that rubbish. It's probably completely possible to work in property development and such with a degree in product design, whether it is the best option to get there though, is a different question.

From the sounds of it, Architecture may be suited to you. There are also degrees out there for Architecture/Property Development specifically!

What do you want to do specifically? Design buildings? Manage property construction??
If you want the design side of it, I'd say Architecture is right up that alley. You don't have to be great at drawing, remember you can use CAD programmes too which require no drawing ability ;D


okay so when talking specifically of what i want to do it.. that one day i wanna see myself running my own sort of company business where I design and make the buildings itself obviously not on my own but with a number of trained people that work in various sections such as electrician plumbing etc..i think architecture seems like what im looking for but from what iive heard you need a lot of studying and im just not up for that like i don't want to study at uni for more than 5 years max i just wanna go out there where i can start my career in a firm then move up the ladder and eventually have my own company running...i just don't know how to put this in words but im looking for a job that involves business, design, technology, maths and ICT where i can go into a course which can help me get into that carrer im looing for as of now i haven't got a clue exactly what but yeah my description explains it all really aha.
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lsaul95
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(Original post by imdumbuneedhelp)
okay so when talking specifically of what i want to do it.. that one day i wanna see myself running my own sort of company business where I design and make the buildings itself obviously not on my own but with a number of trained people that work in various sections such as electrician plumbing etc..i think architecture seems like what im looking for but from what iive heard you need a lot of studying and im just not up for that like i don't want to study at uni for more than 5 years max i just wanna go out there where i can start my career in a firm then move up the ladder and eventually have my own company running...i just don't know how to put this in words but im looking for a job that involves business, design, technology, maths and ICT where i can go into a course which can help me get into that carrer im looing for as of now i haven't got a clue exactly what but yeah my description explains it all really aha.
What you're describing is definitely most closely related to Architecture from what I can tell. When you become an architect you WOULD be working at the bottom in a firm or whatever, then work your way up, get some project experience under your belt and then you could become self employed and start a consultancy firm. Where you would be involved in business, design, technology, maths, ICT... Anything you want really, it would be your firm haha. You could start the firm with other architects so you can do multiple projects at the same time, etc. I think initially you'd probably be contracted to design buildings for construction companies and THEY would build them.
But if you wanted to build them in your firm I'm sure that would be possible if you reached a high, successful level. Anything is possible.

The most likely route to get where you want, from what I can see is Architecture. (Anyone can feel free to prove me wrong if they like, I don't know a lot about this sort of thing, just what it seems like from my perspective and understanding). But obviously your commitment to education is not great for that route.

If this is your dream job you have to be willing to work for it though, even if that means a 5+ year degree and lots of hard work.

It would probably take longer to work your way up to that level in a company than it would to do the degree and start from there anyway. And even then you probably wouldn't have the correct expertise/accreditation to be involved in aspects such as architectural design anyway!!!
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imdumbuneedhelp
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(Original post by lsaul95)
What you're describing is definitely most closely related to Architecture from what I can tell. When you become an architect you WOULD be working at the bottom in a firm or whatever, then work your way up, get some project experience under your belt and then you could become self employed and start a consultancy firm. Where you would be involved in business, design, technology, maths, ICT... Anything you want really, it would be your firm haha. You could start the firm with other architects so you can do multiple projects at the same time, etc. I think initially you'd probably be contracted to design buildings for construction companies and THEY would build them.
But if you wanted to build them in your firm I'm sure that would be possible if you reached a high, successful level. Anything is possible.

The most likely route to get where you want, from what I can see is Architecture. (Anyone can feel free to prove me wrong if they like, I don't know a lot about this sort of thing, just what it seems like from my perspective and understanding). But obviously your commitment to education is not great for that route.

If this is your dream job you have to be willing to work for it though, even if that means a 5+ year degree and lots of hard work.

It would probably take longer to work your way up to that level in a company than it would to do the degree and start from there anyway. And even then you probably wouldn't have the correct expertise/accreditation to be involved in aspects such as architectural design anyway!!!
so what are you suggesting i should do? do you think a a degree in architecture will get me where i want? as i said im not great at drawing and im awful in physics further more my commitment to education is not that good either. i just want to do a so called 'easy' degree that doesn't require that hard work. like of course a bit of hard work but not like one of them engineering degrees where u have lectures for like 30 hours or whatever a week its just too long. when i think of uni im just up for that independent life full of fun etc and then a bit of the study's lol..

do you think if i get a degree in product design/maufacturing engineering i will be able to work as an 'architect' where like i said i can design plan build devlop buildings and stuff like i want to be able to with the degree build a dream house etc?
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lsaul95
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(Original post by imdumbuneedhelp)
so what are you suggesting i should do? do you think a a degree in architecture will get again. ere i want? as i said im not great at drawing and im awful in physics further more my commitment to education is not that good either. i just want to do a so called 'easy' degree that doesn't require that hard work. like of course a bit of hard work but not like one of them engineering degrees where u have lectures for like 30 hours or whatever a week its just too long. when i think of uni im just up for that independent life full of fun etc and then a bit of the study's lol..

do you think if i get a degree in product design/maufacturing engineering i will be able to work as an 'architect' where like i said i can design plan build devlop buildings and stuff like i want to be able to with the degree build a dream house etc?
No, It's very unlikely you'll be able to work as an 'architect' with the product design/manufacturing degree. That's more about consumer devices and point of sale. There's no way you'd be able to get the sort of certification you need in order to design houses and such without being an architect and getting certified as an architect.

If you want to build and design your dream houses then go with architecture. It's not heavy in physics that would be civil engineering. Design isn't just about drawing skill. It's about composition. Shapes. Techniques. Etc. Some of which you will learn how to perfect on the degree I assume.

Ignore difficulty of courses and just go for what you want to do. No degree is easy. You have to enjoy the subject you're studying. Would you rather do something easier at uni and come out with no chance of doing your dream job. Or work hard for a few years and have the highest chance of doing your dream job?

Honestly. I think you're shooting yourself in the foot by not being committed to education. There is a very slim chance you'll get to the position you're describing without working hard. And especially not without working hard at university.

It's also bull**** that people have no time to do fun things at uni if they have a lot of contact hours. I'm going to study mech engineering which is 30+ hours a week and from what other students have said they have more than enough time to have fun.

A construction management degree may be a viable option if you're willing to throw away some of the design aspects. but again, the position you're describing is very much a fully registered architects role!!!

You're most likely not going to get to that position without hard work and a good education. In what is most likely going to be architecture
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imdumbuneedhelp
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(Original post by lsaul95)
No, It's very unlikely you'll be able to work as an 'architect' with the product design/manufacturing degree. That's more about consumer devices and point of sale. There's no way you'd be able to get the sort of certification you need in order to design houses and such without being an architect and getting certified as an architect.

If you want to build and design your dream houses then go with architecture. It's not heavy in physics that would be civil engineering. Design isn't just about drawing skill. It's about composition. Shapes. Techniques. Etc. Some of which you will learn how to perfect on the degree I assume.

Ignore difficulty of courses and just go for what you want to do. No degree is easy. You have to enjoy the subject you're studying. Would you rather do something easier at uni and come out with no chance of doing your dream job. Or work hard for a few years and have the highest chance of doing your dream job?

Honestly. I think you're shooting yourself in the foot by not being committed to education. There is a very slim chance you'll get to the position you're describing without working hard. And especially not without working hard at university.

It's also bull**** that people have no time to do fun things at uni if they have a lot of contact hours. I'm going to study mech engineering which is 30+ hours a week and from what other students have said they have more than enough time to have fun.

A construction management degree may be a viable option if you're willing to throw away some of the design aspects. but again, the position you're describing is very much a fully registered architects role!!!

You're most likely not going to get to that position without hard work and a good education. In what is most likely going to be architecture
fair enough well after much thought it seems i may follow the route of arcitecure but one last question [ i copied this from one of my other thread so you may read something you have already read but here goes]

hmm..i dunno i looked at architectural engineering/technology where some were a BEng and Bsc so im quite interested in that i want to be able in the future to design plan develop and build my 'dream home' Imageso im trying to aim to do something like architecture to start of with then for masters do a construction management or civil engineering course so i will be equipped with the managerial and problem solving skills that are taught in these courses. Image

also check this link out from Birmingham uni, scroll right down to further study bit...
http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/undergra...ployabilityTab

basically it suggests we can do any course as a master following our undergraduate degree such as BEng. i know this is a civil engineering course but would this be the same if i done architecture then for further study done construction management or something? Image
thanks again.
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lsaul95
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(Original post by imdumbuneedhelp)
fair enough well after much thought it seems i may follow the route of arcitecure but one last question [ i copied this from one of my other thread so you might read something you have already read but here goes]

hmm..i dunno i looked at architectural engineering/technology where some were a BEng and Bsc so im quite interested in that i want to be able in the future to design plan develop and build my 'dream home' Imageso im trying to aim to do something like architecture to start of with then for masters do a construction management or civil engineering course so i will be equipped with the managerial and problem solving skills that are taught in these courses. Image

also check this link out from Birmingham uni, scroll right down to further study bit...
http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/undergra...ployabilityTab

basically it suggests we can do any course as a master following our undergraduate degree such as BEng. i know this is a civil engineering course but would this be the same if i done architecture then for further study done construction management or something? Image
thanks again.
Firstly. You have to realise that if you are going the architectural route, which WILL give you the best chance to design your dream home, then it's going to take 5-7 years to become fully registered.
Civil Engineering is not to do with the initial design process but the technical aspects. Efficiency, materials, etc and depends heavily on having a strong interest and ability in Physics and Maths. Which you said you didn't have in previous posts.

Your best route to your goal would probably be to get your architectural certification and work until you have enough status to start your own business. You could do extra qualifications if you like but it's going to extend your study time which you previously said you weren't interested in doing
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(Original post by lsaul95)
Firstly. You have to realise that if you are going the architectural route, which WILL give you the best chance to design your dream home, then it's going to take 5-7 years to become fully registered.
Civil Engineering is not to do with the initial design process but the technical aspects. Efficiency, materials, etc and depends heavily on having a strong interest and ability in Physics and Maths. Which you said you didn't have in previous posts.

Your best route to your goal would probably be to get your architectural certification and work until you have enough status to start your own business. You could do extra qualifications if you like but it's going to extend your study time which you previously said you weren't interested in doing
Great so I am thinking of pursuing my studies in architecture to reach my ultimate goal...so I'm thinking a few years ahead now after completing the architectural engineering course at uni...do you think there after i should carry on to get a masters degree in architecture or switch to construction management? I'm saying this because then I will have skills in both management and architecture and my job opportunities will be much broader.
thanks
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lsaul95
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[QUOTE=imdumbuneedhelp Engineering reat so I am thinking of pursuing my studies in architecture to ...so I'm thinking a few man Construction d now after completing the architectural engineering course at uni...do you think there after i should carry on to get a masters degree in architecture or switch to construction management? I'm saying this because then I will have skills in both management and architecture and my job opportunities will be much broader.
thanks [/QUOTE]
Let me make this a bit clearer. Studying a BA in Architecture is totally different from studying a BEng in Architectural Engineering. The BA will focus on the design of building and structures, which is what you want to do. The BEng in Arch Engineering is a sub group of Civil Engineering and will focus heavily on mathematical, physical and material principles, with small modules in TECHNICAL design work.

Your dream job description is the route of a BA studying Architect. NOT a BEng qualified architectural engineer. Because they are two completely different areas.

Here are the two routes set out.

BA Architecture -> Masters in Architecture -> Industry Experience -> Management role In Architecture -> Owning your own firm doing what you want.

BEng Architectural Engineering -> Masters in specialised Civil Engineering topic -> Industry Experience -> Chartered Civil Engineer

Not true. Actually you'd be shooting yourself in the foot switching to construction management after doing architecture. Construction management is not the job you described wanting to do. Management skills can be gained in the management phase of the BA Architecture route. Which can then be translated to your own firm. BA Architecture is what you want!
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I'm currently studying architecture so thought I'd give my thoughts on the matter

(Original post by imdumbuneedhelp)
I quite like the idea of property developing and selling etc or making my own dream home
ok, you don't need to be an architect to do this. or an architecture degree. what you do need is either the money to pay for an architect, who would design your dream house based on what you told them etc. or you could go into property development, find something that is sort of what you want and work from there. just a thought

(Original post by imdumbuneedhelp)
as i said im not great at drawing and im awful in physics further more my commitment to education is not that good either. i just want to do a so called 'easy' degree that doesn't require that hard work. like of course a bit of hard work but not like one of them engineering degrees where u have lectures for like 30 hours or whatever a week its just too long. when i think of uni im just up for that independent life full of fun etc and then a bit of the study's lol..
(Original post by lsaul95)
Ignore difficulty of courses and just go for what you want to do. No degree is easy. You have to enjoy the subject you're studying. Would you rather do something easier at uni and come out with no chance of doing your dream job. Or work hard for a few years and have the highest chance of doing your dream job?

Honestly. I think you're shooting yourself in the foot by not being committed to education. There is a very slim chance you'll get to the position you're describing without working hard. And especially not without working hard at university.

It's also bull**** that people have no time to do fun things at uni if they have a lot of contact hours.
Isual95 is right. If you want to be designing buildings etc, then it's not going to be easy. No-one in a top position at any firm has had an easy ride there.

How does that fit into architecture? Well, architecture is a lot of hard work. Like, a LOT of hard work. It needs commitment. It also requires good drawing skills (and not just in CAD!). Drawing is your main way of communicating your ideas to your tutors at university, and ultimately your clients in the real world. You'll also be making physical models. Most schools of architecture will require either A level art or a portfolio containing some hand drawings... or both! Ditto physics (although you also don't need physics A level) - as part of Architecture you'll be required to have an understanding of 'structures' (think mechanics, force diagrams and the like). However, if you want it enough, both can be learnt.

Architecture means a lot of hours. In the run up to project deadlines I'll average 4 hours sleep a night (but that's like three or four times a year...). But I still have fun, and a decent social life! Work hard play harder and all that. Architecture's a really social subject - everyone on my course is really close and we'll often go out together to blow off steam round (after lol) deadline time. In order to do well at architecture, you need to enjoy it - so it's not something to be entered into on a bit of a whim. Most of the people in my year who did that dropped out in first year.

If you want to become a qualified Architect, it's six years minimum (and that's some very rare courses that integrate your masters with your second year in practice!). Generally you're looking at a 3 year BA/BSc/BArch, followed by a year in practice, followed by a 2 year MArch/DipArch, and a final year in practice. You need a minimum of 24 months in practice to become chartered, and even then it'll be years before you make it 'big'. Most famous architects are getting on a bit!

Architecture's not horrific, and definitely sounds like the way to go to get you where you want - but getting to the point of being in charge of a team of people delivering big projects is going to take a lot of hard work however you intend on getting there!

Hope that helps
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imdumbuneedhelp
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#18
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(Original post by clareyyyyyyy)
I'm currently studying architecture so thought I'd give my thoughts on the matter



ok, you don't need to be an architect to do this. or an architecture degree. what you do need is either the money to pay for an architect, who would design your dream house based on what you told them etc. or you could go into property development, find something that is sort of what you want and work from there. just a thought




Isual95 is right. If you want to be designing buildings etc, then it's not going to be easy. No-one in a top position at any firm has had an easy ride there.

How does that fit into architecture? Well, architecture is a lot of hard work. Like, a LOT of hard work. It needs commitment. It also requires good drawing skills (and not just in CAD!). Drawing is your main way of communicating your ideas to your tutors at university, and ultimately your clients in the real world. You'll also be making physical models. Most schools of architecture will require either A level art or a portfolio containing some hand drawings... or both! Ditto physics (although you also don't need physics A level) - as part of Architecture you'll be required to have an understanding of 'structures' (think mechanics, force diagrams and the like). However, if you want it enough, both can be learnt.

Architecture means a lot of hours. In the run up to project deadlines I'll average 4 hours sleep a night (but that's like three or four times a year...). But I still have fun, and a decent social life! Work hard play harder and all that. Architecture's a really social subject - everyone on my course is really close and we'll often go out together to blow off steam round (after lol) deadline time. In order to do well at architecture, you need to enjoy it - so it's not something to be entered into on a bit of a whim. Most of the people in my year who did that dropped out in first year.

If you want to become a qualified Architect, it's six years minimum (and that's some very rare courses that integrate your masters with your second year in practice!). Generally you're looking at a 3 year BA/BSc/BArch, followed by a year in practice, followed by a 2 year MArch/DipArch, and a final year in practice. You need a minimum of 24 months in practice to become chartered, and even then it'll be years before you make it 'big'. Most famous architects are getting on a bit!

Architecture's not horrific, and definitely sounds like the way to go to get you where you want - but getting to the point of being in charge of a team of people delivering big projects is going to take a lot of hard work however you intend on getting there!


Hope that helps
hey thanks so much for contributing in my thread. firstly you have kinda put me off of becoming an arcitect lol :/ but i have some questions since u do arcitecture at uni Image

im completely lost now i dont know what to study at uni

i want a course that can allow me to get a job in the building, construction and buinssenes industry..however i dont know about arcitecure or civil engineering they both seem hard something i feel i wont be able to cope with.
as my title suggests do you think product design (industrial designer) or construction management can get me up and running after the completion of the degree to work for a big firm (like working on next olympics stadium or something like that you know Image) then gradually starting my own buinsees managing and selling property that i have renovated,built designed, planned etc? ( bit of a long question sorry lol)

just some personal info i wanted you to know, that currently i am studying maths, design and technology and ICT
i like the buisness, engineering,technology industry
like i said build my dream home obviouly u need money for that but yeh
i have completed my alevel in D.T which i got a B in retaking exam to get an A.
doing A2 starting this september in Maths and ICT for which i both recived a C grade for my AS.
thanks again for your help sorry for all the spelling mistake lol
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clareyyyyyyy
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(Original post by imdumbuneedhelp)
hey thanks so much for contributing in my thread. firstly you have kinda put me off of becoming an arcitect lol :/ but i have some questions since u do arcitecture at uni Image

im completely lost now i dont know what to study at uni

i want a course that can allow me to get a job in the building, construction and buinssenes industry..however i dont know about arcitecure or civil engineering they both seem hard something i feel i wont be able to cope with.
as my title suggests do you think product design (industrial designer) or construction management can get me up and running after the completion of the degree to work for a big firm (like working on next olympics stadium or something like that you know Image) then gradually starting my own buinsees managing and selling property that i have renovated,built designed, planned etc? ( bit of a long question sorry lol)

just some personal info i wanted you to know, that currently i am studying maths, design and technology and ICT
i like the buisness, engineering,technology industry
like i said build my dream home obviouly u need money for that but yeh
i have completed my alevel in D.T which i got a B in retaking exam to get an A.
doing A2 starting this september in Maths and ICT for which i both recived a C grade for my AS.
thanks again for your help sorry for all the spelling mistake lol
Well first off, don't let the hard work put you off. It's going to be hard to get to where you want however you intend on getting there (like I already said)

With regard to "starting my own business managing and selling property that i have renovated,built designed, planned etc" - architecture is definitely the best way of getting there.

You seem very set on uni, but have you thought about other options? Perhaps an apprenticeship in a firm that does that sort of thing? I say this because with BCC AS grades (?) and below par drawing skills, I'm not sure how well you'd fare getting onto an architecture course. You could of course do an art foundation to gain the drawing/representation skills that would set you in good stead but obviously this adds another year (though does reduce the amount your A level grades would be looked at).

But maybe investigate other ways of getting to where you want. Perhaps an apprenticeship is the best way of doing this, or some other alternative qualification you could maybe do alongside working (I have no idea about these lol). Your best bet might be trying to get some work experience in different fields within the construction industry, and deciding which part you might like to go in to - you seem very focused on two very different aspects, property and very large scale projects. It could even be worth just having a chat to various people who already work in the areas you'd like to work in, to see what they did to get there.
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imdumbuneedhelp
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(Original post by clareyyyyyyy)
Well first off, don't let the hard work put you off. It's going to be hard to get to where you want however you intend on getting there (like I already said)

With regard to "starting my own business managing and selling property that i have renovated,built designed, planned etc" - architecture is definitely the best way of getting there.

You seem very set on uni, but have you thought about other options? Perhaps an apprenticeship in a firm that does that sort of thing? I say this because with BCC AS grades (?) and below par drawing skills, I'm not sure how well you'd fare getting onto an architecture course. You could of course do an art foundation to gain the drawing/representation skills that would set you in good stead but obviously this adds another year (though does reduce the amount your A level grades would be looked at).

But maybe investigate other ways of getting to where you want. Perhaps an apprenticeship is the best way of doing this, or some other alternative qualification you could maybe do alongside working (I have no idea about these lol). Your best bet might be trying to get some work experience in different fields within the construction industry, and deciding which part you might like to go in to - you seem very focused on two very different aspects, property and very large scale projects. It could even be worth just having a chat to various people who already work in the areas you'd like to work in, to see what they did to get there.
you do have a point that i should look into other ways of getting to my ambition. however my parents strongly oppose that and they want me to go to uni as its the traditional way etc..tbh I personally want to experience the uni life to which is part of the reason I want to go.
so its a very difficult decision.
in terms of free hand drawing i am not great however i have various other skills on CAD and in my design and technology portfolio (product design) i achieved 78/80 which is A* equivalent so yeh..
because of this i have a strong feeling I will be able to do well in a product design degree however as I have previously mentioned my interests are more towards the construction and building field. how about a degree in construction management? do you know anything about this and do you think with this degree I could do the "starting my own business managing and selling property that i have renovated,built designed, planned etc" or do you strongly suggest the architecture route? its just that I have heard so much negativity about the course in terms of the work load and that architectures don't have much of a social life. even there after the pay for an architecture doesn't seem great compared to other related jobs.
thanks again sorry about the spelling mistakes
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