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    It's something I'd love to do, but I'm terrified that I won't be able to handle the workload or that I'll be working with scarily clever people who'll outdo me exam time. I'm in lower sixth now, and we soon have to start applying for uni. Another prob of mine is I'm not outspoken at all, whereas I get the impression most medical students are really good communicators and are not afraid to speak up in discussions. I don't know what to do. Also could someone please tell me what happens after you graduate? Is it hospital training then slowly being promoted towards consultant level? I would appreciate some honets advice xxx
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    (Original post by Lozingzeplot)
    It's something I'd love to do, but I'm terrified that I won't be able to handle the workload or that I'll be working with scarily clever people who'll outdo me exam time. I'm in lower sixth now, and we soon have to start applying for uni. Another prob of mine is I'm not outspoken at all, whereas I get the impression most medical students are really good communicators and are not afraid to speak up in discussions. I don't know what to do. Also could someone please tell me what happens after you graduate? Is it hospital training then slowly being promoted towards consultant level? I would appreciate some honets advice xxx
    You need to speak to Daveo. He's not scarily clever (no offense Daveo! )
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    (Original post by Lozingzeplot)
    It's something I'd love to do, but I'm terrified that I won't be able to handle the workload or that I'll be working with scarily clever people who'll outdo me exam time. I'm in lower sixth now, and we soon have to start applying for uni. Another prob of mine is I'm not outspoken at all, whereas I get the impression most medical students are really good communicators and are not afraid to speak up in discussions. I don't know what to do. Also could someone please tell me what happens after you graduate? Is it hospital training then slowly being promoted towards consultant level? I would appreciate some honets advice xxx
    If it is what you want to do then go for it. I sometimes felt like you, and even still do :confused:. Yes there is a lot of work but if I can handle it you can, Yes everyone is scarily clever, I hate not being top of the class anymore. But it is really interesting and good fun - well sometimes :rolleyes:

    When you graduate (there has been or will be some changes soon - i'll refer to the system as i understood it):
    You work as a Pre Registration House officer for one year, then become an Senior house officer for about 3 years, then become a Registrar for 5ish years then hopfully consulantship.

    If you have any more q's don't hesitate to contact me.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    You need to speak to Daveo. He's not scarily clever (no offense Daveo! )
    No offense taken I used to be scarily clever in comparison to other people now i'm just another fish in the sea, a lower ranking fish at that.
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    (Original post by Lozingzeplot)
    It's something I'd love to do, but I'm terrified that I won't be able to handle the workload or that I'll be working with scarily clever people who'll outdo me exam time. I'm in lower sixth now, and we soon have to start applying for uni. Another prob of mine is I'm not outspoken at all, whereas I get the impression most medical students are really good communicators and are not afraid to speak up in discussions. I don't know what to do. Also could someone please tell me what happens after you graduate? Is it hospital training then slowly being promoted towards consultant level? I would appreciate some honets advice xxx
    Hey!

    Buy yourself a copy of 'So You Want to be a Brian Surgeon' It's the best careers guide to medicine. lists all the post degree qualifications requierd for each speciality.

    As for being timid etc, I wouldn't worry about it. Medicine at the end of the day is about empathy, not about who has the biggest gob! You usually find the loud people are loud as they are insecure.....

    If med is what you want to do, you should go for it!
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    (Original post by Daveo)
    No offense taken I used to be scarily clever in comparison to other people now i'm just another fish in the sea, a lower ranking fish at that.
    I should imagine med school is a great equalizer isn't it? You're the smartest guy in school for years and then suddenly you find yourself one of many smartest guys! Must be quite a blow.
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    The important thing in communication is that you can communicate your ideas effectively to someone else, and in the case of patients, in a sympathetic way. You don't have to be hugely outspoken to do that.

    Most of my medic friends are not scarily clever - we may have been considered that at school but now everyone's on a level playing field and it's much nicer that way.
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    i dont think you need to be massively outspoken. i know a girl whos quiet as a mouse and shes just had 2 offers. just make sure you really want to do it cos its a hard slog.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    I should imagine med school is a great equalizer isn't it? You're the smartest guy in school for years and then suddenly you find yourself one of many smartest guys! Must be quite a blow.
    Yeah it is quite a blow, but it's also quite fun because my immaturity is rubbing off on some of them and its funny.
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    (Original post by Daveo)
    Yeah it is quite a blow, but it's also quite fun because my immaturity is rubbing off on some of them and its funny.
    Well that's good Daveo. I look forward to being treated by a comedy doctor when I'm old and frail.
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    (Original post by Daveo)
    If it is what you want to do then go for it. I sometimes felt like you, and even still do :confused:. Yes there is a lot of work but if I can handle it you can, Yes everyone is scarily clever, I hate not being top of the class anymore. But it is really interesting and good fun - well sometimes :rolleyes:

    When you graduate (there has been or will be some changes soon - i'll refer to the system as i understood it):
    You work as a Pre Registration House officer for one year, then become an Senior house officer for about 3 years, then become a Registrar for 5ish years then hopfully consulantship.

    If you have any more q's don't hesitate to contact me.

    Is it more to do with memory than anything else? Plus were you nervous to start with? Most people who plan to study medicine seem ultra-enthusiastic and show hardly any signs of nerves about the course. I imagine if I applied to do medicine I'd be really excited, but still really apprehensive-I'm worried that I won't cope with it and end up wasting a year with nothing to fall back on. Is it natural to feel nervous beforehand-apparently patient contact starts in the first week-and sometimes I can't even talk rationally with my own dad
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    (Original post by Daveo)
    When you graduate (there has been or will be some changes soon - i'll refer to the system as i understood it):
    You work as a Pre Registration House officer for one year, then become an Senior house officer for about 3 years, then become a Registrar for 5ish years then hopfully consulantship.
    This is all changing - under the new foundation scheme. Some trusts are already piloting it... Two year PrHO, and rejigging the SHO programme - I have some info on it somewhere - will try to dig it out and post it here.

    By the time anyone beneath about current 3rd/4th year med qualify it will be fully implemented.

    Fx
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    (Original post by Lozingzeplot)
    Is it more to do with memory than anything else? Plus were you nervous to start with? Most people who plan to study medicine seem ultra-enthusiastic and show hardly any signs of nerves about the course. I imagine if I applied to do medicine I'd be really excited, but still really apprehensive-I'm worried that I won't cope with it and end up wasting a year with nothing to fall back on. Is it natural to feel nervous beforehand-apparently patient contact starts in the first week-and sometimes I can't even talk rationally with my own dad
    Well, it depends on which medical school you go to as to when you get patient contact. At Cambridge the only patient you'll be meeting is your cadaver. And the first few patient sessions really aren't that hard/scary.

    There is a lot of memory work to it, especially in anatomy, but quite a bit of understanding too. However, if you are good enough to get in, you will handle it. A lot of people are nervous about whether they will be up to scratch, but because medicine is a passion, they hide those nerves away. Everyone is a little apprehensive about starting uni, you really shouldn't let your nerves stop you if medicine is what you want to do.
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    This is all changing - under the new foundation scheme. Some trusts are already piloting it... Two year PrHO, and rejiggest SHO programme - I have some info on it somewhere - will try to dig it out and post it here.

    By the time anyone beneath about current 3rd/4th year med qualify it will be fully implemented.

    Fx
    Here's some basic info to get you started:

    http://www.bma.org.uk/ap.nsf/Content...tion,programme
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    Well, it depends on which medical school you go to as to when you get patient contact. At Cambridge the only patient you'll be meeting is your cadaver. And the first few patient sessions really aren't that hard/scary.

    There is a lot of memory work to it, especially in anatomy, but quite a bit of understanding too. However, if you are good enough to get in, you will handle it. A lot of people are nervous about whether they will be up to scratch, but because medicine is a passion, they hide those nerves away. Everyone is a little apprehensive about starting uni, you really shouldn't let your nerves stop you if medicine is what you want to do.
    How many hours of self-directed learning do you need to do per day to keep up? How much harder is the course compared to A-level standard? Plus with dissection do you get a textbook with guidelines or are you verbally told what to do? Can you tell I'm panicking majorly-I hope none of this comes across in the interview
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    (Original post by Lozingzeplot)
    Is it more to do with memory than anything else? Plus were you nervous to start with? Most people who plan to study medicine seem ultra-enthusiastic and show hardly any signs of nerves about the course. I imagine if I applied to do medicine I'd be really excited, but still really apprehensive-I'm worried that I won't cope with it and end up wasting a year with nothing to fall back on. Is it natural to feel nervous beforehand-apparently patient contact starts in the first week-and sometimes I can't even talk rationally with my own dad
    I was nervous yeah, that was soon gone though. A lot is to do wiht understanding the way things work, if you learn it this way it is far easier and far more useful.
    The patient contact thing depends, at Manchester once you get past the second year you are based in hospitals so will get patient contact, however next years 1st years at Manchster are getting early patient contact in the first yaer - lucky so and sos'.

    (Original post by Lozingzeplot)
    How many hours of self-directed learning do you need to do per day to keep up? How much harder is the course compared to A-level standard? Plus with dissection do you get a textbook with guidelines or are you verbally told what to do? Can you tell I'm panicking majorly-I hope none of this comes across in the interview
    Manchester being a pbl course says you should do about 40hours outside university a week, I did about 20 last semester and passed fine. I don't think the course is that much harder than A Level it just requires more effort because it is a lot different. Our dissection is lead by an anatomy demonstrator who is a doctor, he guides us as to what we are supposed to do.

    If you want to do it go for it.
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    (Original post by Daveo)
    I was nervous yeah, that was soon gone though. A lot is to do wiht understanding the way things work, if you learn it this way it is far easier and far more useful.
    The patient contact thing depends, at Manchester once you get past the second year you are based in hospitals so will get patient contact, however next years 1st years at Manchster are getting early patient contact in the first yaer - lucky so and sos'.

    Manchester being a pbl course says you should do about 40hours outside university a week, I did about 20 last semester and passed fine. I don't think the course is that much harder than A Level it just requires more effort because it is a lot different. Our dissection is lead by an anatomy demonstrator who is a doctor, he guides us as to what we are supposed to do.

    If you want to do it go for it.
    So pbl doesn't involve constant lectures-is that right?- or meaning you get a lot of case studies?Wow 40 hours is bloody hard work!
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    (Original post by Lozingzeplot)
    So pbl doesn't involve constant lectures-is that right?- or meaning you get a lot of case studies?Wow 40 hours is bloody hard work!
    Manchester is a purely PBL course, and I have the following each week:
    3, 1hr sessions of PBL - group discussion.
    2hrs Disscetion
    MAX 6hrs lectures
    2hrs Computers
    2hrs Practical/2hrs Histology
    an average of about 16hrs a week, and I wouldnt worry about the 40hours thing. I am however worried about my lack of work this semester.
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    Anyone got an idea on the drop-out rate and semester pass rates for medicine?
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    (Original post by Lozingzeplot)
    How many hours of self-directed learning do you need to do per day to keep up? How much harder is the course compared to A-level standard? Plus with dissection do you get a textbook with guidelines or are you verbally told what to do? Can you tell I'm panicking majorly-I hope none of this comes across in the interview
    Well, Daveo's given you the info on Manchester, so I'll tell you the Cambridge side of things. We get a dissection manual which takes you through what you need to do each session, and tells you information about what you're looking at. There are also demonstrators available who help you with stuff and talk you through things to make sure you know stuff.

    Our timetable is something like:
    2 x 2hr dissection per week
    1 x 2hr Physiology practical p.w.
    1 x 2hr Histology practical every other week.
    8 - 10 hours of lectures p.w.
    3 x 1hr supervisions p.w.

    On top of this you are expected to read and learn dissection notes before each session (but I don't always, and can usually get away with it), you will have essays for your supervisions to prepare and write (Cambridge is very essay-heavy). There are also the odd extra things like PBL exercises (one per term of two sessions), Preparing for Patients (two GP visits plus an essay and a review session), a Biochem practical each term and the joys of Medical Sociology and ISBM (Introduction to the Scientific Basis of Medicine - aka boring epidemiology). I would say about another 20 hours on top of the basics per week would probably be about right.

    I would recommend Medlink for someone like you - it'd be worth it if you want help making up your mind if Medicine is for you. Look at various universities websites or get prospectuses to get a feel of the style of medical course they offer, and go for ones that suit you.
 
 
 
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